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I did some rearranging of the shop today to make room for my next and hopefully last big tool purchases for a while. I'm gonna start hunting for a jointer and planer. The market for used jointers is very healthy in my area, powermatics, jets, deltas..etc are all available for less than $250.

I was looking for a enclosed base 6" jointer but is there any real advantage over an open base? I was also wondering if there was any model of planer that will run off of 110v that is not a lunchbox style planer? There are a few planers around me but all are either lunch boxes or 30" 3 phase monsters. Keep in mind everything I buy is used. So it's needs to be something I can look for on the used market.
 

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where's my table saw?
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it's about the dust

An enclosed base jointer probably has a sloped shoot to allow the dust to fall onto the floor OR get sucked up in the DC. The open style, which I have one .... I had to make a sheetmetal plate to attach my DC hose and a transition fitting from 6" to 4" hose.

As far as planers go, you either go from a 1 or 1 1/2HP on 120 V, the lunch box variety, to a 3 HP on 220 V. heavy cast iron version. Sometime you can score an old Walker Turner or Powermatic 12" or 16" so keep your eyes peeled. I found a 12" Foley Belsaw years ago and I'm still runnin' it. Woodmaster is very similar and a good machine.
if you find one, post the link, we'll tell you :yes: or :no:
 

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One of the best old 12" planers is the Boice-Crane planer. Mines a Direct drive model, and weighs 450#'s
It's a great planer, that gives snip free cuts. I feed 8' boards thru it, without any added infeed or outfeed tables. Just hold the end of the board, until fed 1/2 way, then hold the front end as it comes out.
It doesn't have any height lock and doesn't need them.
 

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where's my table saw?
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it's a bit of a misnomer

What is a "lunch box variety?"

G
http://images.search.yahoo.com/search/images?_adv_prop=image&fr=ytff1-tyc-inbox&va=portable+planer

Even though they're about 4 times the size of a "lunchbox" but they are basically a portable planer than can be carried to a job site, or put away on a shelf. Many folks start out with them with great results, but I prefer a stationary cast iron unit with an induction motor running on 220 V. 3HP or greater. It will plane all day long without a sniffle.
 

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Edit:

Waterboy

I have a DW734 and after taking the time to properly adjust the infeed table I have snipe free results.

I use the walk around outfeed approach mentioned by a previous respondent.

As a "shop guest"I have used the DW735 with major snipe. This was due to non-existent or inadequate set up by the purchaser.

Whether you buy a used machine or a new one read the OM cover to cover. Run test cuts as a base line in evaluating performance.

Based on these results consult the trouble shooting guide in the manual.

Many adjustments are made in the factory QC department and are indicated in the manual.

When trouble shooting performance issues avoid fiddling with factory presets until all other options have been eliminated.
 

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A lot of these Delta/Rockwell planers were sold in the 80s. They last a long time and show up frequently on ebay and craig's list. Would probably be a little more than $250, though. I paid $450 for this one, but the picture is after a complete rebuild.


 

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That design is best

With the motor on top, turning the cutterhead, the table stays at a fixed height. :thumbsup: This allows infeed and outfeed support tables to be positioned easily and no need to accommodate for the material removed in the planing process..... I wish mine were like that...:sad:
 

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With the motor on top, turning the cutterhead, the table stays at a fixed height. This allows infeed and outfeed support tables to be positioned easily and no need to accommodate for the material removed in the planing process..... I wish mine were like that...
I don't follow. Are we still talking about the 1950's one?
 

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It's an early 50's model.
I have a delta X 15" Looks almost the same. It does not appear that they have changed much. It loves to eat wood.
Very nice rebuild on that machine. :thumbsup::thumbsup:
 

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http://images.search.yahoo.com/search/images?_adv_prop=image&fr=ytff1-tyc-inbox&va=portable+planer

Even though they're about 4 times the size of a "lunchbox" but they are basically a portable planer than can be carried to a job site, or put away on a shelf. Many folks start out with them with great results, but I prefer a stationary cast iron unit with an induction motor running on 220 V. 3HP or greater. It will plane all day long without a sniffle.
This sentence "As far as planers go, you either go from a 1 or 1 1/2HP on 120 V, the lunch box variety, to a 3 HP on 220 V. heavy cast iron version." in your earlier post indicated that you think a lunch box variety is anything smaller than "3 HP on 220 V).

I do not think you really mean that. I doubt that you call your 6" jointer "lunch box." I certainly know that y 120 volt 6" Craftsman is not lunch box.

George
 

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By "lunch box", I think he simply meant portable. Either way, my portable works good, and there have been few times when I needed more capacity. When I did, I just took the offending piece down the street to the woodworking shop, and the guy there charged me 10 or 15 bucks to do it.
 
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