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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I just picked up some walnut shorts from the local mill and I need to glue them up in to wider boards (they are between 5 and 6" wide)
I have never done this before (but have read lots on the various technique)

I paid to have them planed (currently 3/4")
As I obviously have no planer and my hand planes amount to one dull block plane - can I use pocket screws to make the joints? - I can hide almost all of the plugs in my finished project ( i have a kreg jig) and if I were to do that do I need to worry about sanding down to the tip of a pocket screw?

the widest dimension I have in the finished project is approx 16" only

I spent a lot of money on the walnut (Walnut is very valuable! :smile:)
and I'm worried I'm out of league and should have build a few more pine objects before going after this one.

I have the wood in the room the project will end up in acclimatizing now

If pocket screws no good - should I use some other joint or just old fashion glue and clamps (I can do one 3 board glue up at a time with clamps)
 

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pope of chilitown
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as long as the edges are squared (have they been jointed?) then you can just use glue and clamps. i will be doing this either later today or tomorrow on some maple, I can take some pictures and post if you like?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanks tim - if you don't mind - that would be great!

they are jointed (I paid for that too!) my concern with clamps is I
end up with a joint that is not perfect (I assume none of them are!) and have to do a bunch of sanding - then end up with boards that are not true. Am I being silly?
 

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Old School
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If pocket screws no good - should I use some other joint or just old fashion glue and clamps (I can do one 3 board glue up at a time with clamps)
I would not use pocket screws or biscuits or any joinery other that just glue and clamps. If the edges are are smooth and flat and at 90° to the faces, you might have some cauls and clamps ready to align the faces.

When clamping up the boards, alternate the position of the clamps (top and bottom), and don't over tighten. Cauls are just a straight edge that when clamped to a multi board glue up keeps them flat.








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where's my table saw?
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Check this out

Several tips and techniques in here:

Something similar:
 

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normally i like to leave the wood oversized in the thickness, so that after glue up they can be planed once more to final thickness, cleaning up any uneveness left by the glue up process. i think glue and clamps are adequate also. try to alternate the growth ring patterns if possible (e.g. up, down, up...), leading to a more stabe panel. the jointer work here is the most important, any non-90 degree edges make alignment during glue up a slippin' fun time (not). i like to tighten the clamp on one end, then as i work across to the next clamp, manipulate the unclamped board ends up or down to satisfy the edge alignment under the next clamp. then tighten the next clamp and continue across in that manner.
 

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If you're trying to limit the amount of sanding and "finish work", try laying painters tape along the face of each edge that you're gluing and clamping. That way, when the clamping begins, the squeeze out glue adheres to the tape instead of the wood beneath. Easily removed and painters tape doesn't leave behind a ton of residue.
 
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