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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
People, I am trying to find a way to glue these two pieces of wood together to make a small table.


But as you can see the bottom log is holed from its top (it used to be for small candles).



I am not experienced in wood working and I am hoping not to cut big parts of the log (if possible) since it is not very tall and the wood pattern on top is beautiful.



From more experienced people, any suggestions or advice how I can glue to two pieces together?
 

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where's my table saw?
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.... glue them together?

What do you mean exactly? Do you want to stack them? OR do you want them side by side?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
stack them, if that means to glue the flat piece on top of the bottom tree log, as in the right picture.


but as you can see, the top of the tree log is holed, so these holes will be covered by the flat piece.
 

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still not clear to me

Do you want to glue the "flat piece" on the top of the holes? If so why? You have 3 pieces which can be stacked in 3 different ways .... which way?
A. log piece,
B. flat piece
C. holed piece
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
no no, i have two pieces, the log piece that has holes on its top, and i want to cover them by gluing another piece (the flat piece) on top of it. Thus giving the log a flat top surface.
 

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OK, I get it now.

You do want to cover up the holes, thus eliminating the candle holding possibilty. That threw me off. :surprise2:

There's no big difference whether the holes are there or not if you want to glue them together. Just spread the glue around carefully, but getting some down the holes won't matter. I would then locate the flat piece so it covers as much as possible. Then place weights on top for 24 hours. I'd use a Titebond 2 glue for interior use.

Someone went to a lot of trouble to make those holes and if it were me, I'd make the table "convertible" so they could still be used. Maybe a glass top instead of the solid flat piece? Another way would be to use dowel pins to locate the flat piece so it can't slide around,but is removable .... just a thought. :vs_cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Laminating the sides

What about laminating the sides? you can see that it is rough (not sanded) and it looks beautiful, can i laminate it as is? or I must sand it before laminating?


i am not going to colour it, just laminate it.
 

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What about laminating the sides? you can see that it is rough (not sanded) and it looks beautiful, can i laminate it as is? or I must sand it before laminating?


i am not going to colour it, just laminate it.

To laminate you must have more than one piece. What is it that you want to laminate too the sides.


laminated

[lam-uh-ney-tid]
See more synonyms for laminated on Thesaurus.comadjective
  1. formed of or set in thin layers or laminae.
  2. constructed of layers of material bonded together:
 

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If I'm understanding this correctly, the image on the right of your photo is what you want in the end - you're asking for advice on how to attach the slice (flat piece cut from a branch or log) just like your photo shows it.

If that is correct, I wouldn't try to glue these two pieces. Neither piece is perfectly flat, and they will change shape differently over time (which would create stresses, and possibly cracks, over time if they were glued together).

I assume your goal is to keep the slice from moving around. I might consider doweling: locate 3-5 dowels on the under side of the slice, positioned so that each dowel has a slight friction fit against a wall of one of candle holder holes.


Sent from my LG-H910 using Tapatalk
 

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An end grain glue up doesn't hold as well. Given all the holes I believe I would attempt to put at least one dowel into the two pieces. Dowel work is difficult even for an experienced woodworker trying to get the holes perfectly aliened but a single hole should be doable. Then assuming the two pieces don't fit together perfectly flat I think I would use a heavy paste two part epoxy to make the glue up.
 

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This is end grain to end grain glue up. If you just want the top to stay put, then slather on some glue and put on the top and add some weight to "clamp it in place.

To keep if from sliding around I would drive four thin brads into the base and clip off all but about 1/32" of the brad. Rest the top in place after the glue has been applied. When you press down the brads will dig into the mating surface and prevent it from slipping during the glue up.

This will work fine if you don't plan on lifting the table by grasping the top. A simple solution would be to add casters so that there is no motivation to lift it.

Alternatively you can dowel the top in place. 4 dowels should do the trick. I would get a bottle of "Corner Weld" glue. It was developed for picture framers and is specially formulated for end grain to end grain joints. And from my tests it performs much better that regular glue for that purpose. http://framerica.com/shop/wood-glue/corner-weld-pint/
 

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It looks like you are making a table, have you considered what will happen if a bit of weight is placed toward the edge of the top with such a narrow base?

I would glue buttons on the bottom of the slab about 3/4" thick, then drill a pilot hole and insert a screw. make a dowel the depth of the hole and drive a nail into the center, cut the head off so it protrudes about 1/4", use this as a guide to position the buttons.
 

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Like several of the others said I would put 4 "legs" on the bottom of the slice placed to fit inside the candle holes. That would immobilize the top if placed correctly but still allow access to the candle holes if need be.
 

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1948
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Or invert the unit (for better stability) and mount the top on the other end. The slab will easily cover the entire opposite end (it does not quite manage on the shown end).

You can also add a base to the unit and screw and glue that from the bottom (it won't show).

You can through dowel the top. 1" diameter dowels and wedges would look nice and would add immense strength.

First glue and screw. Let the glue dry. Remove one screw and drill a 1" hole. Install the dowel and wedge. Repeat for the other dowels. Trim and sand and finish.
 

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Or cut off the end that has the holes in it. The table would be a little shorter but in the end look better than having the log slice glued on the top. Glue the log slice to the bottom as a base so the table isn't tippy.
 
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