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I must not be doing something right as I have searched for threads about this on here and came up with nothing that discusses this and I know there has to be many on here. Anyway, I'm looking to replace my old plastic Craftsman jigsaw that has served me well for what little I have done over the years. Now that I'm more serious and am doing more I feel I need a better saw. I would like for you guys/gals to steer me in the right direction. I'm thinking Bosch, don't ask me why, but, don't know which one. I would really appreciate input on this. I just do little projects for the wife such as little stands, picture frames, swings for the grand kids, etc. I have all the other saws, just need a good jigsaw. Thanks
 

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bosch barrel grip is the best jig saw I ever used. hands down. wish I had one, have a dewalt top handle tool-less. tool-less is nice for changing blades with out tools.
 

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For a jigsaw specifically, I would look at cordless battery options over corded... especially if you plan on making directional changes mid cut (which a jigsaw is best suited for) or inside pocket cuts that eventually end where you began, with the saw's cutting edge turning back from whence it came.

Being able to focus one's mind entirely on the intricacy of the cut, without worrying about cord management, or a cord getting caught on the edge and pulling taught just as you are about to make a critical directional change, or worse, albeit unlikely, cutting the cord... is liberating.

A jigsaw in particular doesn't require the raw power that a circular or reciprocating saw often needs for the jobs one typically reaches these respective tools for, so of all the tools to run cordless, especially with today's generation of 4, 6, and 9 amp hour lithium ion batteries, a jigsaw would be an excellent application to leverage the ability to operate cord free.

A contractor friend had his all tools stolen out of his locked enclosed cabinet service body work truck at Home Depot. I happened to run into him at the check stand, and walked out of the store with him when I noticed several men in safety vests and hard hats milling around a service truck that turned out to belong to my friend. The thieves even wear costumes these days. I gave chase, but a senior citizen on foot is no match for a lawless (albeit well dressed) gang of three thieves in a (now loaded) SUV barrelling full blast out of the parking lot. I got distracted... anyway, one of the tools that was stolen was the vaunted Bosch Jigsaw.

Flush with adrenaline from having just witnessed this bold and blatant broad daylight burglary by what appeared to be an immigrant gang cloaked in bright white hard hats and safety vests, and angry for having not been able to catch them, I asked my friend to make a list of all the tools that were stolen, about $2,000 worth, and I stormed back into the store and bought them all, and wheeled the cart over to my contractor friend.

Except, I didn't repurchase his Bosch corded jigsaw. Instead, I bought the Milwaukee 18v battery operated jigsaw. I selected Milwaukee solely due to the fact that he already was using the M18 fuel battery system. I was worried at first that he wouldn't like my choice (and I couldn't involve him in the decision, because it was a spur of the moment surprise)... so in the weeks that followed, I periodically asked him if he would rather have his old corded jigsaw instead. His answer remains a resolute no! He LOVES using the cordless jigsaw, preferring it over the corded saw that was stolen.

I still have my corded (yes, also a Bosch) jigsaw. In the 90's, the Bosch jigsaws stood head and shoulders above almost every other jigsaw commonly available, and thus earned their reputation as the go to jigsaw to buy. However, a lot has happened in 20 years, and today, battery powered tools have advanced to a parity in power and performance with most hand held corded equivalents. I'm too cheap to replace my own jigsaw with a cordless one, but if faced with a decision to buy a new jigsaw today, I woudn't hesitate to go cordless.
 

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I own 4 models, but the best is Bosch in terms of accuracy and speed. There are other options, such as Festool and Mafell, but they are very expensive. You should go to a store and check out which version of Bosch suits you better (top-handle or barrel grip).
 

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I don't any other jig saws to compare to, but I bought an 18v DeWalt out of necessity while working out of town on a kitchen remodel. I really like the way it feels in my hands and soo much better to use than the corded DeWalt, which I had left at home.

I have since sold the corded model and use the battery powered one a lot.
 

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I have the Bosch and it’s by far the best portable jig saw I’ve ever used.
Boschhas a wide assortment of blades. The saw has several adjustments for rough or smooth.
Powerful with an ample length cord and no tools needed to change out blades.
 

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I love my Bosch barrel-body with cord. In spite of the attractions of the cordless arguments, I will point out that the cordless versions are heavier, not as powerful, particularly after an extended cutting session, and the battery sticks out enough at the rear to offer less clearance in tight quarters. Yes, the corded version is powerful enough to sport a 4" blade easily through solid wood, kinda like a more precise mini Sawzall. One last thing, the batteries have a limited life that tapers off over time; the cost of replacing those batteries is so high that it makes sense to just buy a whole new tool.

FYI, like a number of other manufacturing victims, Bosch agreed to a limited collaborating relationship with Festool, who copied many of Bosch's great ideas in their RO sanders and the vaunted jig saws, and then launched their own versions that are and perform remarkably like the Bosch versions, but just at 2x-3x the cost.
 

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My Bosch jigsaw is 30 years old as well.

Back in favor of the cordless, the Milwaukee 18volt I bought for my contractor friend takes all of the current Bosch blades. The mounting is the same. I made sure of that.

The argument that batteries don't last, or are not as powerful as corded, is 30 years old as well. Today's batteries will break your hand with power. Literally. I broke my hand using a DeWalt 18v cordless to drill a series of 2.5" diameter holes for soffit vents. The hole saw caught, and broke my hand. The doctor thought I had punched a wall in anger and was lying to him as to the cause. Nope. It was a battery operated tool.

A neighbor gave me a 20v lithium ion 1/4" driver, because he didn't have a charger for it. I didn't either, but I accepted the tool 'cause I'll take anything for free. I put it away and forgot about it. A full YEAR went by, and I stumbled across this tool while looking for something else. I pulled the trigger, and it still ran at full speed! That was the costliest "free" tool I ever received, because I ended up spending another $1,000 for seven tools and 9 more (4 amp hour) batteries to build a complete system. Which is another reason why cordless works so well today... not only do the lithium ion batteries last eons longer than the previous generation NiMH and NiCd battery systems... they don't discharge nearly as much while dormant. And you can always instantly change batteries to continue work. I have three unopened batteries in the wings waiting for another tool to add to my system. Heck, I might just buy a cordless jigsaw! But I might buy a cordless 15 guage nailer instead, to save from dragging an airhose across newly laid engineered hardwood floors to finish the baseboards.

An argument against cordless would be in whether or not the jigsaw has variable speed. I sometimes find that lower speeds help with difficult cuts. I most often use a jig saw with plywood, where the layers of ply like to tear out and splinter on the surface if I don't take precautions against it. And quite often, my cuts are not perpendicular, but are rather at 15 degree angles. I have found that slower jig saw speeds make my cuts more controllable, with less tear out. I would want that kind of control in a cordless jigsaw. I don't know if that exists, because I haven't shopped for one for myself. But beyond the variability in stroke profile (from orbital to straight up and down), I think stroke speed is actually more useful in gaining control over the cut.
 

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For quite a few years I used a B&D saw. It lacked power but seem to keep going and going. When it finally wore out I bought a Skill professional saw. It was heavy and looked like it was built like a tank. I was very impressed until it wore out two weeks after the purchase date.
 

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What happened?

For quite a few years I used a B&D saw. It lacked power but seem to keep going and going. When it finally wore out I bought a Skill professional saw. It was heavy and looked like it was built like a tank. I was very impressed until it wore out two weeks after the purchase date.
Specifically, what went wrong? Was it the motor or the mechanism? Blade holder? Seems strange... did you return it?

I have a older "bullet proof", Porter Cable with the motor as the handle. It has cut hundreds of feet of sheet metal and wood. I've had it for years and still use it for difficult materials.
I also have a Bosch with the handle above the motor and quick change blade system. That feature is difficult to use in my opinion, and I fumble with it almost every time.
I've had two Craftsman since my first venture into woodworking some 30 years ago with the setscrew blade holder. That feature is also not my favorite since the blades are most narrow at that point and tend to break easily.
I bought a cheap Black and Decker for my son to use when he was 10 years old. It is surprisingly powerful and easy to use. It's light weight and blade changes are easy. It's not the first one I reach for, BUT that's just a thing I have against using a cheaper tool.... :|

This can not be helpful because there is no conclusion. :sad2:

I just remembered I have a Milwaukee 18 V cordless which I would probably use more often, since there is no cord. The cord is always getting hung up on something. Milwaukee is my favorite cordless brand after years of using Dewalt and many failed NiCad batteries.
 

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Flush with adrenaline from having just witnessed this bold and blatant broad daylight burglary by what appeared to be an immigrant gang cloaked in bright white hard hats and safety vests, and angry for having not been able to catch them, I asked my friend to make a list of all the tools that were stolen, about $2,000 worth, and I stormed back into the store and bought them all, and wheeled the cart over to my contractor friend.

Wow! What a good person you are! I bet he was shocked at your gesture. You sure know how to pay it forward! Nice to hear (first hand) a good story.
 

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Metabo barrel,Porter cable with guide, Bosch barrel and D handle. Barrel Bosch is still better,,,
 

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Specifically, what went wrong? Was it the motor or the mechanism? Blade holder? Seems strange... did you return it?

I have a older "bullet proof", Porter Cable with the motor as the handle. It has cut hundreds of feet of sheet metal and wood. I've had it for years and still use it for difficult materials.
I also have a Bosch with the handle above the motor and quick change blade system. That feature is difficult to use in my opinion, and I fumble with it almost every time.
I've had two Craftsman since my first venture into woodworking some 30 years ago with the setscrew blade holder. That feature is also not my favorite since the blades are most narrow at that point and tend to break easily.
I bought a cheap Black and Decker for my son to use when he was 10 years old. It is surprisingly powerful and easy to use. It's light weight and blade changes are easy. It's not the first one I reach for, BUT that's just a thing I have against using a cheaper tool.... :|

This can not be helpful because there is no conclusion. :sad2:

I just remembered I have a Milwaukee 18 V cordless which I would probably use more often, since there is no cord. The cord is always getting hung up on something. Milwaukee is my favorite cordless brand after years of using Dewalt and many failed NiCad batteries.
It was the motor. It all but caught fire. It got real hot and smoked. I did take it back but I didn't exchange it. At that time I bought the Bosch. I just can't remember if I bought the Bosch from that store or somewhere else.
 
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