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I was curious what is the easiest method for making stop cove profiles? Sorry this sounds so basic, I am fairly new and still learning. I was planning on simply clamping a board to the outfeed table side as a stop and clamping a board to the feed side as a stop so I could plunge into the piece and then feed it through and when it hits the other wood stop on the other end it would create my other end of the stopped cove.

Let me know if my logic is good please....

I am also using a benchtop router, so matching the height is going to be tricky with my outboard side and feed side to create this type of jig.

I am making a book case and want to do stop cove profiles on the stiles.

Thanks again for helping out a beginner. :)
 

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where's my table saw?
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yup, that's an easy way

You can also make marks on your fence to register the start/stop points. Both are quick and easy. If you make a sample and use the blocks you will get repeatable and uniform coves every time. A mark can be missed or overshot, so they are less "accurate". :yes:
 

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Old School
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I am making a book case and want to do stop cove profiles on the stiles.

Thanks again for helping out a beginner. :)
Sounds like you want to make flutes for a pilaster look. You could do it with stop blocks on a router table. I like doing them with a handheld and making a jig. The jig is very simple. You could set up an edge guide, and the first flute on either side is the same setup. The next flute is spaced by moving the edge guide, for both sides, etc.

I prefer doing them with a handheld, as you can see what you are doing, and it solves the problem of not enough length for the router table. If the grooves you want to make are like the pilasters in the picture below, use a core box router bit.
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warren_6.jpg






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Better picture



ForumRunner_20131227_180130.jpg
 

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Wood Snob
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woodnthings said:
You can also make marks on your fence to register the start/stop points. Both are quick and easy. If you make a sample and use the blocks you will get repeatable and uniform coves every time. A mark can be missed or overshot, so they are less "accurate". :yes:
One or two cuts I use the marks. When cutting a bizzilion I go with the stops.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 
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