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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Just got my first-ever plane, a Stanley Sweetheart No. 62, 14 in. Low Angle Jack Plane.

I don't know exactly how the depth adjustment works, nor relationships between the depth adjustment and the mouth adjustment.

Out of the box, the iron (blade) was not visible in the mouth, although the front and back sides of the mouth opening feel sharp to the finger. The iron can be made more or less visible with the depth adjustment. The manual says, "The depth adjustment can be altered depending on the depth of cut required, although as a general rule the depth of the cutter (iron) should protrude through the mouth to approximately the thickness of a human hair." Because "depth ... should protrude" seems nonsensical, I'm assuming it means to say, "cutter should protrude." But adjusting the depth doesn't seem to make the iron protrude through (below, towards the wood surface) the mouth but only to move the iron forward and backward so that more or less of it is visible through the mouth opening.

The size of the mouth opening can be adjusted separately.

Should the plane remove any shavings in the out-of-the-box condition? It didn't seem to. Regardless, generally, which direction of depth adjustment should I make to increase depth of cut?
 

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From the rear, clockwise. And, yes, it should make shavings although it may not be as sharp as it should be. My guess is you are not turing the adjustment knob enough.
 

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Brec ... have you seen a diagram like this? When you turn the Blade Adjuster nut, it moves the blade forward or backward, and because it’s on a slant, the edge of the blade is exposed more or less.

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
From the rear, clockwise. And, yes, it should make shavings although it may not be as sharp as it should be. My guess is you are not turing the adjustment knob enough.
(Reply to @Half Fast Eddie also) Yes, I've seen diagrams and youtube vids and I think I now understand the principle. But adjusting my iron/blade "depth" seems only to adjust the horizontal movement of the forward edge of the blade, to obscure more or less of the mouth looking up from the bottom or down from the top. Even when it's adjusted to almost fully obscure the mouth, there is no protrusion visible sighting along the bottom of the sole -- and no shavings are produced. Because the iron/blade sits on an angle such that its rear is slightly elevated, I don't understand why moving the iron/blade forward wouldn't also move its front edge down, but it doesn't seem to move down far enough to protrude below the flat of the sole.
 

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It is a low angle plane, so it does slide it forward and backwards more than up or down, but it DOES also move it up or down a little.

The bevel up planes are like this.

My typical method is to open the mouth fully, adjust the depth of cut, then close up the mouth to the right size. The mouth doesn't change much from light to moderate shavings, but you do get more of the bevel blocking off the mouth the more iron you expose.

Take a look at the angle of the adjuster relative to the sole of the plane. Advancing the screw advances the blade along that axis.
 

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The adjuster on the no 62 is a lot different, and it adjusts the blade more directly and at a lower angle (it goes forward more than it goes down in one rotation.
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Is the tab circled in red hooked into the slot circled in blue so it can push blade down.
View attachment 434821
It's hard for me to translate that diagram to what I'm seeing (thumbnails so you can enlarge at will):

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In short, the only (re)moveable parts of mine, aside from the adjustable mouth width at the front (not shown), are what Stanley calls the black Lever Cap, the iron/blade, and the adjusting thingy (tab?) with its attached adjustment screw. 1st photo: assembled; 2nd: Lever Cap removed; 3rd: iron/blade removed.
 

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Correct. That is typically referred to as a "Norris style adjuster" it is different than the photo you posted of a "Bailey style adjuster".

The Norris are more common where the bevel is facing up when in use. The Bailey design is intended for bevel down planes using a chip breaker.
 

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The red pin can move all the way forward to the front of the slot. You have that much room to advance the blade. Keep turning the screw.

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
It is a low angle plane, so it does slide it forward and backwards more than up or down, but it DOES also move it up or down a little.

The bevel up planes are like this.

My typical method is to open the mouth fully, adjust the depth of cut, then close up the mouth to the right size. The mouth doesn't change much from light to moderate shavings, but you do get more of the bevel blocking off the mouth the more iron you expose.

Take a look at the angle of the adjuster relative to the sole of the plane. Advancing the screw advances the blade along that axis.
W/r "close up the mouth to the right size" -- what determines the right size?
 

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W/r "close up the mouth to the right size" -- what determines the right size?
Many things...
It needs to be bigger than your shavings so it doesn't clog.
The smaller the mouth and the lighter the cut, the less chance of tearout.
It's a balancing act. Keep it close but not too close.
 
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W/r "close up the mouth to the right size" -- what determines the right size?
Some word is much more prone to tearout than others. Start with something soft like pine or cedar, open the mouth wide so you have room to advance the blade without risk of hitting the sole. Advance the blade, take a couple of swipes, advance a little more until it starts to make shavings.
 

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The mechanism is pretty straight forward, this is a bevel up low angle plane, but the principles are the same - 1 depth of cut, 2 even shavings side to side. IMO the mouth opening is not that critical but should be closed down.

It does not work the same as a bevel down plane (IMO a #4 should be your first purchase). BU jack planes are most useful on endgrain, not very good as a smoother.

The very first thing you need to do is flatten the back and hone the edge!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
The mechanism is pretty straight forward, this is a bevel up low angle plane, but the principles are the same - 1 depth of cut, 2 even shavings side to side. IMO the mouth opening is not that critical but should be closed down.

It does not work the same as a bevel down plane (IMO a #4 should be your first purchase). BU jack planes are most useful on endgrain, not very good as a smoother.

The very first thing you need to do is flatten the back and hone the edge!
Sorry, flatten the back of what?
 

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Sorry, flatten the back of what?
The back of the iron (blade) has to be flat in order to a) contact the base properly and b) hone the bevel evenly.

Plenty of videos in prepping a plane iron. The plane itself is going to need some prepping check the video mentioned above.
 
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