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Hello all. First post.
Inspired by my New Englandy neighbors and years of watching Yankee Workshop, I decided to replace all the spindles on the front porch of my 1875 Victorian, not knowing how. Step 1, buy a lathe and turning tools. Check. I found an old Craftsman (made by King-Seeley) 9x30 on Facebook Marketplace being sold by a WWII vet. THE nicest guy and gave me some great pointers. He was sad to see it go and almost didn't take my money. So nice. Model 103.23180. I found a pdf manual. Got some gouges and the like. I've learned that most of you guys sharpen your own, so I have a bench grinder now. No jigs yet but I've had great success freehanding. (I'm trying to pace my purchases lest my wife might murder me)

Step 2 - I set up my new rig. Check. The guy sold the lathe with a table he had made for the whole operation to mount the motor and all - got it wired up, and I'm off and running. I made some really ugly spindles at first but I'm getting the hang of it. It's great fun.

So there's a terrible noise while the machine is running that I can sometimes reduce by changing the pressure from the tail end of the machine. I assume I can rectify this with a new thrust bearing. And I need a new belt because this one looks pretty worn.

So here's why I need the braintrust - where do I look for replacement parts? I think (?) I need a new bearing and belt, and I'd like to get a live tail instead of the dead one it came with. I've heard I can get any live center that has an M1 taper, but I don't have any positive confirmation of that fact. Hoping you all can help.

Also, the spindle collar outside the headstock, it apparently slides and has a set screw. What's the setting for that? Where should I slide it to? Apparently certain parts can be oiled? What kind of oil is best? Any other upgrades you can suggest?

Thank you,
Phil

p.s. I found the image on google, but it's my model. I don't know who that image belongs to.
 

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Egg Spurt
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If you find the right parts for this lathe let me know. Mine is probably older with cast iron clam shell (I guess that's a good description) cover for the belt pulley(s) among other parts. Mine is louder than loud and pretty much shakes the entire wall since I have it bolted down to a screwey bench that's connected to the wall. Perhaps we bought both lathes from the same guy.. I felt bad for the guy I bought mine from almost as if I was dragging away his favorite old hound dog to take out in the woods to shoot.
The tapered piece off the headstock on mine is a friction fit and the others just thread on.
I really haven't made a whole lot of use with the lathe, but it does work. I need to get a decent bench grinder and learn to sharpen the tools and such.. I hate to say it, but I'm leaning towards HF for a cheapo grinder..
 

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almost all bearings used in the mid 20th century to present used standard bearings. Any bearing shop should be able to fix you up by measuring the old bearing. Or cross referencing the bearing number on the bearing. Got bearings for all manner of things from a bearing shop. Italian motorcycle dealer wanted $50 for front wheel bearings with a 6 week paid in advance order. Got them in five minutes from the bearing shop fpr $ about $3 each. Nearly every large town has a bearing shop somewhere.
 

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If you take the fan belt to a good automotive supply they can probably match it up to a new belt. No part number will be necessary. An old belt can get stiff and add to your vibration, so a new belt might help reduce vibration. Good luck.
 

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Like they said, go to a "bearing shop" also known as an industrial supply company. Around here I use Motion Industries. If they don't have it in stock they often can have it the next day. Take your old bearings to them, the #s on the bearing help with getting the correct ones. They will also have belts. Often better belts than you will get at an auto supply store.
Sears used to have a nasty habit of specifying bearings that are non-standard. Imperial bore, metric OD??? There could only be one reason for doing that!
 
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