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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
I started to refinish my dresser which had a tint finish as i do understand ( first picture is the original color), and I am going to finish it the same way, so i did strip it with a varnish stripper and washed it with a lacquer thinner ( second and third picture).
So the question, is this enough? I cant clean whats inside the pores , will it effect the adherence of the new finish? If it is time to sand what grit should i start with and end it with? It is veneered by the way.
And finally is this Ash?
Thanks a lot.
 

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If you are going back the same color then it should be good enough. The original finish appears to have a glaze on it. I think the wood was stained with an ebony dye or black paint and then sealed and possible a first coat of topcoat. Then a white or gray glaze was applied to it wiping off the excess leaving the gray in the grain. Then the finish coat was put over it. This is a similar procedure done with a white basecoat and a brown glaze accenting the grain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the quick replay Steve, Regarding the color I'm not sure if it was glaze, the gray color is only the reflect of the light in the picture, looking at it by eyes its just a plane black, only in certain angle the light reflect will couse it to have the grain to show some contrast. But if it is glazed i think i am going to skip it and go with the black. Again thank you buddy for the quick respond.
 

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It looks to me like it could be Ash plywood. The first picture looks like a different piece, or the backside. You can just use a black dye, and topcoat it with whatever finish you want. I would do a quick scuff sand with 220x.

If you are wanting the same finish, what was wrong with what was there to make you strip it?






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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes cabinet man the first picture is a different peace, I'm refinishing it because it was full of scratches reaching all the way to the wood and some acetone spills. Thx for the grits.
 

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I usually don't sand with anything higher than 150 to 180 grit.
I have gotten the same exact finish with black lacquer without using stain, wood grain filler, glaze or anything else. The lighter color in your first photo seems to be just the reflection of light.

This is a photo I copied from my old website, sorry I don't have the original photo handy. It was a while back.
 

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You could use anything for a finish then. It could be stained with an ebony dye or you could use black paint and wipe off the excess using the paint as stain and clear coat or you could just paint it black.

It might be fun to clear coat what you have. :laughing: It would sure catch everybodies eye.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Tony, i think the peace was finished with a black lacquer as well, couse when I sand it before applying the striper the sand powder was redish.

Steve, lol I was thinking of that but it will really heart the eyes to have some thing like that in a room.

For what I am planning on doing is using an NC based black stain which is a dye i think! And couple of sanding sealer coats to inshore a smooth finish and top it with simi gloss lacquer.
I made a picture frame last year and finished it the same way.
 

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... And couple of sanding sealer coats to inshore a smooth finish and top it with simi gloss lacquer..../QUOTE]

I'm not sure what you mean by the above. If you are referring to a flat surface, like in no grain indents and pores, you must use a paste wood grain filler.Sanding sealer will not fill the pores unless you trowel it on.
When you use a paste wood grain filler, which can be purchased in colors or dyed, it cab be any color you want. When finished, the surface will be flat with no pores or grain canyons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I agree with what you said Tony, what I meant is to make sanding easier since I am working with a veneer and not taking the risk to sand thro it.
But in pervious projects I did use the sanding sealer to fill pores, I used a high build urethan sanding sealer and it worked fine with 6 coats, the reason that I dident use a grain filler is were I live there is nothing available called a grain filler.
 

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I agree with what you said Tony, what I meant is to make sanding easier since I am working with a veneer and not taking the risk to sand thro it.
But in pervious projects I did use the sanding sealer to fill pores, I used a high build urethan sanding sealer and it worked fine with 6 coats, the reason that I dident use a grain filler is were I live there is nothing available called a grain filler.
"Grain filler" can also be called "paste wood filler". Products like putty, hole filler, wood patch, etc., should not be confused with a grain filler. Using a sanding sealer can help with grain filling, but will likely take many applications. Using a grain filler may seem like PITA by having to spread it on, wipe it in, and sand it off, but that process will be one application in most cases.

Another choice...if you have nothing but your film finish topcoat, would be to thin the heck out of it so it penetrates more effectively. Solvent based lacquers can work like that.






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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank you Cabinetman, all product that i was looking in here was a wood filler they were just like any wood filler that will not stain, but let me ask this, can i use a Stucco filler as a grain filler? I did a sample once and it stained well and it really leveled the pores. But I am not trusting its longevity!
 

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Thank you Cabinetman, all product that i was looking in here was a wood filler they were just like any wood filler that will not stain, but let me ask this, can i use a Stucco filler as a grain filler? I did a sample once and it stained well and it really leveled the pores. But I am not trusting its longevity!
Surely there is a Sherwin Williams near you or other regular paint store. They would be able to fix you up with a paste wood grain filler. I don't think I would substitute something like drywall mud. It would initially work however I don't think the binder in it is strong enough to stay. I believe over time it would come out. A grain filler dries extremely hard like bondo.
 

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No Sherwin Williams in here Steve, I will check with paint stores.
When all else fails there is always mail order available. I think if you got the water based grain filler there wouldn't be a hasmat fee. I've never used a water based grain filler so I can't say how well it works. Any finishing products you just can't get you can order from http://www.mohawk-finishing.com/
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thank you for your support Steve, but there is no international shipment in that site, and most of flammable/toxic fume stuff wont ship internationally.
 

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Way before my time, some furniture makers used Plaster of Paris and dyed it with alcohol dyes and stains while they were mixing it. I have read this but never tried it. It seems like it ought to work, after all, you are only filling pores.
I would definitely try it on some scrap oak pieces first.

Keep in mind that you apply a paste wood grain filler AFTER your first coat of sealer.
 

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Thank you for your support Steve, but there is no international shipment in that site, and most of flammable/toxic fume stuff wont ship internationally.
I'm sorry. I missed your location. I was giving you advise as if you were in the US. If I were going to improvise a grain filler I would take a wood putty like you fill nail holes with and thin it down about the consistency of paint and brush it on and immediately spread it with a broad knife and squeegee it as best as you can. When dry then sand level with 180 or finer sandpaper.
 
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