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Watch the jointer.
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Basically I can buy http://www.toolstoday.com/p-5370-carbide-tipped-forstner-bits.aspx

(the 2" one), or http://www.woodworkingshop.com/product/fb-015/

This one. Sharpening is no problem, I have diamond files. Common sense told me to go with the carbide, but even more common sense told me to ask some seasoned veterans for their opinions.

Should I go for the carbide over the HSS? Or would you recommend a third option entirely? I'm willing to pay a little more if there's a better one out there. I have an inexpensive Porter Cable bit from Lowes right now, and it wasn't the best on friction/dulling. I don't like paying my drill bits to be my person trainers. (I do freehand cuts for table leg mortises with a 1/2" drill, so it can burn those forearms.)
http://www.toolstoday.com/p-5370-carbide-tipped-forstner-bits.aspx
 

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Watch the jointer.
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I appreciate your input. Just out of curiosity, have you ever used carbide tipped forstners?
 

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I appreciate your input. Just out of curiosity, have you ever used carbide tipped forstners?
Yes, I have been making wooden vases, which require drilling a 1 13/16in hole.

I posted a build thread.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f6/making-flower-vase-52041/

I have a 1 3/4in Colt Maxi-Cut bit, but they do not make a 1 13/16in bit.

I purchased a carbide 1 13/16in bit from Grizzly.

I drill first a 1in hole, then a 1 3/4in hole with the Colt Maxi-Cuts.

I finish with the Grizzly 1 13/16in carbide Forstner bit. No surprise this bit has an easy time removing the final 1/16in.

I have not tried to use this bit in lieu of the 1 3/4in Colt bit.

I am not able to determine the contribution of carbide vs bit design in the performance of the bits.
 

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I've had a set of Freud carbide Forstners for over 14 years. They have been used in all sorts of bit-dulling materials like MDF, plywood, particleboard and melamine (never softwood, though). I've had them sharpened once in that time (ouch!) and they still work as good as the day I bought them. I also have a few odds and ends (Freud) of HSS forstners. They seem to cut a slightly cleaner hole, and more quickly. So, I would buy my set again in a heartbeat. But if I was buying a single bit i would consider what I'm doing, the extra cost, and make a value judgement.
 

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I've had a set of Freud carbide Forstners for over 14 years. They have been used in all sorts of bit-dulling materials like MDF, plywood, particleboard and melamine (never softwood, though). I've had them sharpened once in that time (ouch!) and they still work as good as the day I bought them. I also have a few odds and ends (Freud) of HSS forstners. They seem to cut a slightly cleaner hole, and more quickly. So, I would buy my set again in a heartbeat. But if I was buying a single bit i would consider what I'm doing, the extra cost, and make a value judgement.
I have the same results with Freud HSS. I tried the Grizzly and Freud carbide FB and they tear the wood fibers. I use mine on red oak and the finish on the HSS is far superior to the carbide.
I also did not like the size of the pilot tang it seem to be too big. The carbide definitely were more difficult to use the way I bore holes. I cut to a depth of 1/16 than turn the piece of wood over and use the pilot hole to cut from the other side to get a clean surface from both sides. The hole needs to be functional from both sides. I also found that I could not do this accurately with the carbide.
 

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Watch the jointer.
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks to everyone for the info. I'll have to see what I can do, the price is the only bad thing about it...

Beautiful vases btw!
 

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Old Methane Gas Cloud
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Thanks to everyone for the info. I'll have to see what I can do, the price is the only bad thing about it...
Those are good prices.

I have a 1-1/16" carbide forstner bit. It is used do drill a recessed hole in the bottom a furniture legs to hold the felt pad or slick pad.

Mine is from Woodline and no complaints. The only reason that I bought the carbide model is that I needed 1-1/16".
 

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Sawdust Wrangler
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The best Forstner bits I have used are the Colt Maxi-Cut.

Part of the performance may be the design, part may be the steel alloy, but the combination works best for my needs.

Not cheap, but these have been a good purchase for my needs.

http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Mer...e=packard&Category_Code=drilling-bits-maxicut
you can get the colts in carbide as well. You just thought the steel ones were pricey...

http://www.infinitytools.com/COLT-MaxiCut-10-Pc-Forstner-Bit-Set/productinfo/101-163/
 

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you can get the colts in carbide as well. You just thought the steel ones were pricey...

http://www.infinitytools.com/COLT-MaxiCut-10-Pc-Forstner-Bit-Set/productinfo/101-163/

I have the Colt 1 1/16 and the 1 5/8 for pepper mills. I have the MT 2 taper for my lathe as well as the extension, but just recently the extension stripped out while drill a maple pepper mill. Have any of you use these bits without the adaptors? I have not tried them without the adaptor in my drill press for fear of damaging the drive shaft. I purchased them at woodcraft.
 

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I haven't seen it brought up the new style bits that have replaceable cutting edges. They're similar to a tiny version of a Planer blade that bolts to the tip of the bit.

I haven't used a Forstner bit in a few years but I certainly remember the plumbers and electricians would blow a head gasket when they would run into a nail on our jobsite with their bit. It seems a good system for these. I've seen them at HD for around 45$.
 
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