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I'd want the saw to be as compact as the old Craftsman cast iron saws.
Why don't you look for one of the old Craftsman saws if that's close to what you want? My son and I bought a complete saw about 3 years ago for $45 at an estate sale. Looks pretty much like your picture except the leg assembly is smaller (they are adjustable, so it's possible mine could be brought out to the size in the picture). Motor runs perfectly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Why don't you look for one of the old Craftsman saws if that's close to what you want? My son and I bought a complete saw about 3 years ago for $45 at an estate sale. Looks pretty much like your picture except the leg assembly is smaller (they are adjustable, so it's possible mine could be brought out to the size in the picture). Motor runs perfectly.
I am considering a 10" Craftsman as a stop-gap. Craftsman offered the customer much greater budget-friendliness in its configuration options than modern saw vendors do. You could start with the basic Craftsman hybrid saw model and upgrade by adding table wing extensions and a more powerful motor. These old saws are close to what I want in terms of the size of the cast-iron table and rails and the ability to upgrade it by adding wings and a different motor. But it doesn't have good dust collection, an excellent fence, or modern-day safety features.
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
I don't understand your analogy or your reasoning.
Statement (A) Your needs and application is unique in the woodworking shop. You only want to rip boards into narrow pieces, a specialized application.
There are "purpose built" rip saws that feed the work in a straight line and come out so fast it's hard to keep ahead of the rate to stack them. I've used one, I know.
Statement (B) Your needs are different than most woodworkers who will need the additional width capacity for breaking done sheet good for making cabinets as well as ripping narrow boards. You are the exception, not the rule as far as marketing the features most often needed on a table saw. Your application requirements are "essential" to you, but very few others. Buy the saw with the extra capacity and remove the stuff you don't need. save and replace when you need change.

Machines with rotating spindles or arbors don't care or know what the operator installs on them. They just spin at the determined RPMs.
Whether it's a saw blade or a stacked dado, it makes no difference to the saw. It does require a different approach from the operator because the amount of material being removed is much greater with a dado, so the feed rate must be adjusted down a bit. Most machines with spinning arbors can perform more than one function. A tablesaw can rip, crosscut or make dados. Even cove cuts by sliding the work across the blade at a skewed angle between two guides. The table saw is not called "the heart of the woodworking shop" for whimsical reasons. It's because it is so versatile.

I've used both a router and a guide and a table saw. Here's what I know:
On the table saw, you must hold the work down flat on the table or it will leave a bump up in your dado. It's accurate if you register the work continuously against the fence.

Using the hand held router, you must hold the router base firmly against the guide at all time or you'll have a "divot" in the dado which will be unsightly and your workpiece will NOT fit in the dado!
I will certainly concede that many kinds of dado cuts are more easily done on the table saw than with a router, and that the saw is versatile in terms of the kinds of cuts it can make, but it does one thing better than any other tool: rip long boards; that capability is its essential virtue. But dadoes are a side issue to my point, which was that there's no need for hybrid saw packages to be as wide as they are today in their most basic configuration. Today's basic hybrid saw configurations are vendor-friendly (make the vendor more moolah) whereas they used to customer-friendly (no need to spend money on things you don't need)

I never said I want to rip long boards into "thin pieces". What I want to do is buy rough-sawn boards and cut them to the desired widths for my projects. No need for wide rip capacity, and more importantly, no room for those wide rails! A cast-iron saw like the 1950-60s Craftsman basic bench-top hybrid saw (20W x 27D) but with modern dust collection, a better fence, and modern safety features is what I want . But nobody makes a modern version of that saw.

The Craftsman hybrid saw from the 1950s-60s basic "starter" package, at only 20" wide, was half as wide as today's basic-package hybrid saws. That vintage hybrid saw was truly upgradable. I simply want to have purchasing and upgrade options that are no less flexible than the options woodworkers 50-70 years ago had available to them.
 

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@mrblint

i have a ridgid T2400 it small 30 x 20" about the size you want. it is not cast iron.
both are using cast aluminum saw top
Tamar makes do with a small table saw using a DeWalt/ she had used for about four years
note the fence rails do go past the table.


there is a lot of good ideas on using a small footprint saw.
 

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I will certainly concede that many kinds of dado cuts are more easily done on the table saw than with a router, and that the saw is versatile in terms of the kinds of cuts it can make, but it does one thing better than any other tool: rip long boards; that capability is its essential virtue. But dadoes are a side issue to my point, which was that there's no need for hybrid saw packages to be as wide as they are today in their most basic configuration. Today's basic hybrid saw configurations are vendor-friendly (make the vendor more moolah) whereas they used to customer-friendly (no need to spend money on things you don't need)

I never said I want to rip long boards into "thin pieces". What I want to do is buy rough-sawn boards and cut them to the desired widths for my projects. No need for wide rip capacity, and more importantly, no room for those wide rails! A cast-iron saw like the 1950-60s Craftsman basic bench-top hybrid saw (20W x 27D) but with modern dust collection, a better fence, and modern safety features is what I want . But nobody makes a modern version of that saw.

The Craftsman hybrid saw from the 1950s-60s basic "starter" package, at only 20" wide, was half as wide as today's basic-package hybrid saws. That vintage hybrid saw was truly upgradable. I simply want to have purchasing and upgrade options that are no less flexible than the options woodworkers 50-70 years ago had available to them.

Craftsman saws of that era were never called hybrids. This term originated around 2010 or s, when a hybrid between a contractor saw and a cabinet saw was designed, I believe first by Jet? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Table_saw
It is a new technology:

While "ripping" is the function table saws are best at, it's not the only function they are capable of and that's why they are sold with a miter gauge, side extensions, rear folding supports and even router table extensions. My Craftsman 10" hybrid 22124 came with those accessories built in, but no router table extension.
Table Table saws Wood Flooring Floor


What you are saying is a 16 OZ hammer is only good for pounding 8 penny nails. No, it can drive smaller 6 penny and larger 16 penny nails. It's not up to you to decide what functions a table saw can or should do. It's up to the millions of consumers who are purchasing it.
Your requirements are very precise and specific, so you need to get one that fulfills those requirements, and leave the "masses" to their own needs.
 
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