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Discussion Starter #1
First of all i'm new to the forum and wanted to say hello.

But, my question is...
I am in the process of building a simple crib. It will be painted, so grain and look of the wood is not an issue.

I was wondering if using poplar to keep cost of wood down is a reasonable choice?
 

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I think it would be. Keep in mind that poplar is a little softer than most hardwoods, so dents and scratches may be a little easier to acquire. An alternative that's almost as cheap (at least around me) is hard maple; at least at the hardwood lumber dealer I use.
 

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You can also look for some ash, it is usually between poplar and oak in cost around here, and can be had quite cheaply on sale.
 

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I'm a big fan of poplar myself, though less so of the stuff at the big box stores. I have used poplar for lots of pieces, both structural and ornamental. It provides nice contrast when used with a darker wood, and can display some beautiful colors under the right circumstances. It yields a very paintable surface for your application, and if you were to use a two-part enamel with a hardener, you may be able to avoid some of the scratch and dent associated with poplar. It's a very workable turning wood, so if your crib design calls for spindles, so much the better. Good luck!

WCT
 

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Yep, poplar will work just fine, and takes paint quite well. It will be cheaper than maple or ash in most places but certainly sufficient to the task if it's the right price for your budget.
 

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Poplar should work however you may have to make some of the parts a little bigger. Since we don't know the design it doesn't turn very well into skinny spindles.
 

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Poplar is good.
I might build the structural horizontal beams from maple for the slight cost difference. If the design has any high stress areas maple would be good. Most classic Windsor chair were built from two or three types of wood each chosen for its properties. Paint made it all right.
 

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As others have stated, Poplar will work just fine for your project, it machines much easier than maple, but should have all the strength you need for a crib.

Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Great Help

Thanks again everyone for the great suggestions. Im glad I signed up for this Forum....
I will post some pics when I am done
 
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