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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I have not a lot of experience with woodworking, so I would like to verify my plans with the experts.
This is a wall-mounted beer glass holder I intend to make. The slits are large enough to hold 3 of my largest beer glasses by their foot. The 2 bars at the right side are for the beer glasses without foot, which will be held up with their handle.

I would like to know if this is strong enough, so that my glasses won't come crashing into the ground.

Here are some technical details:
- Planks in my local DIY store are 18 mm thick (0.7 inch), no alternatives to this.
- There is some variation into kinds of wood, for example I could take the slightly more expensive oak wood, if it is necessary.
- The heaviest glass with a foot is 300 g (0.66 lbs), the heaviest one without one is 800 g (1,76 lbs). This means that a total of 2.4 kg (5,3 lbs) must be held by the small sticks of 18 mm x 30 mm (0,7 inch x 1,18 inch). Also the total max load of the structure would be 9.6 kg (21,16 lbs), carrying 30 glasses in total.
- I cannot make the wooden triangles any longer, as they would interfere with the glasses.
- I'm using the screws I have available. I could go get more, but if it suffices, it suffices.

My options as I see them:
- Use stronger wood.
- Use longer L-shaped metal bits instead of wooden triangles.
- Shorten the rightmost poles so only 2 glasses.
- Make the triangles longer and give them a curve, to not interfere with the glasses.
- It's fine as it is.

Thank you for taking the time to view my request.

Sincerely,

CX
 

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if the grain of the wood runs the length of the shelf as shown, that means the fingers sticking out to support the glasses only have the cross grain width between slots to hold the weight. that small cross grain section is obviously the weakest point - 3 x 800 g glasses in one slot with cross grain ready to snap off would make me very nervous.

you might consider putting a bit more space between the slots and using longer and thinner 'triangles' for support further out. the triangles do not need to be much more than 5 mm thick - they are 'edge loaded' and their resistance to buckling strength is quite good.

or (curved) metal brackets - you'll need a L-edge at the back to screw to the wall mounted board - but a simple slot in the horizontal shelf would do for spacing an anti-movement.
 

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You do not provide the orientation of the wood on the rack. If the grain in running front to back there is no problem with your design.

If the grain is across then there MAY be a problem, but I suspect not. Take a piece of the wood you are using and make a sample of one of the toungs. Measure how much pressure you have to place on the end to cause it to break.

George
 

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If it were me I would put a shelf above the glass rack to support it and only use two of the corner brackets below it on each end. The shelf would give you space to put stuff on.
 

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You do not provide the orientation of the wood on the rack. If the grain in running front to back there is no problem with your design.

If the grain is across then there MAY be a problem, but I suspect not. Take a piece of the wood you are using and make a sample of one of the toungs. Measure how much pressure you have to place on the end to cause it to break.
I don't yet know how the grain will go since I haven't bought the wood yet. But great idea to test it on a bit first, only way to make sure indeed. :D


If it were me I would put a shelf above the glass rack to support it and only use two of the corner brackets below it on each end. The shelf would give you space to put stuff on.
Good suggestion, but in my case it doesn't apply at the place I'm at now. Also the plan was to hang it up high so I can't bump into it and destroy my glasses (I bump into things).
 

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I should work without any problems. If you fasten it to the wall properly the unit will not fall. The weight on any tongue is relatively small. It will work. 18mm thick wood is not going to break under the weight of a couple glasses.
I've gone ahead and bought some cheap wood and proceeded to saw some slits into them. I thought I was going to need a chisel to cut the slits off, but turns out they break off very easily. The remaining wood is also really wobbly and I feel like it would break off easily. In the off chance it wouldn't break, the would will give in and hang sloped towards the floor, maybe causing glasses to slide. A lot of the lack of strength is because it's against the grain of the wood, as Tom said earlier. In any case, this is not the wood I will be using.

I'm thinking about getting "concrete flex" wood (literal translation) which are those thin plates glued on top of each other. Then it would work without problems as you say.
 

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