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I would start with a better blade. Adjust your upper guide as close to the top of the stock as possible. When you guide the work through the blade, it's how it's guided. If you force feed the work, the blade will drift, and the cut won't wind up at 90° to the table. Try to get the feel of the blade cutting and smoothly feeding the work.






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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
I would start with a better blade. Adjust your upper guide as close to the top of the stock as possible. When you guide the work through the blade, it's how it's guided. If you force feed the work, the blade will drift, and the cut won't wind up at 90° to the table. Try to get the feel of the blade cutting and smoothly feeding the work.






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I do have a new blade on my saw. The best I could find, locally, was an Olson All-Pro blade. Also, I do keep the bearing assembly as close to the wood as possible. I cannot maintain the 1/4" distance recommendation, because of my view, then, being obstructed. It is also because of obstruction to my viewing angle that I have had to totally remove the blade guard. As far as feedrate is concerned, I am not forcing the wood through the cut. I patiently allow the blade to do its job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Assuming proper setup of the saw, it's probably the dang blade. :yes:
I've had new blades drift and cut to one side faster than the other...like NASCAR only turns well left... won't turn right etc.


If you are using a 1/4" wide blade for your bandsaw boxes with tight radius turns, make certain the guides are only 1/2 way into the gullets, no further. Make certain the tension is "greater" than you think it should be. Don't count on the red washer on the back. Open the cover exposing the blade on the left side. With your thumb, "thunk" the blade and listen for a solid tone, not a dull flutter. A musical ear will help here, but I can't tell you what note if should be, although I did measure it one time with a tuning meter. Make certain the blade has an aggressive set to the teeth... 6 TPI or fewer.

If bandsaw boxes are "your thing" order several 1/4" blades from a Lennox or Starrett distributor and have them shipped to your home.
Thanks for your input.

According to what you have written, I am going to have set things up a bit differently. I have had my bearings (upper AND lower) just behind the foot of the blade's gullet. I thought that this was what I had gained from Akex Snodgrass, but I could be wrong. I will, however, setting the bearings about halfway into the gullet, as you have suggested, to see if that betters the cutting any. I know how you mentioned setting the tension to a greater strength than I think might be needed, and you just may be on to something with that. I am really of the mindset that something is wrong with my bandsaw, which (quite possibly) plays heavily into my 'tensioning' situation.

There is a steel plate, on the rear of my bandsaw, that the tensioner adjustment knob/pole runs through. And at the bottom of this plate is, naturally, the tensioner spring/gauge. Well, I have been having a problem with fluid movement of this plate, when attempting adjustments. So much so, that I have had to tap on the top of this plate with my dead blow hammer, in order to effectuate any degree of downward movement. And this is an action that I must take ANY and EVERY time that I may need to make an adjustment.

Now, I had been in communication (email) with a Steel City tech, who had suggested that I use a bit oil in that assembly and, at first, I kind'a went along with. I am an individual who believes in looking at every possible aspect of a situation, before making any judgment, and I lent myself to the possibility that there might have been an element which needed nothing more than a break-in period. But when I went to buy my new bandsaw blade, the other day, the salesman took me over to the same model bandsaw as mine, and showed me the tensioning assembly on it. I had explained what was going on with mine, and he stated that what I had shared was most definitely NOT supposed to be. When he released the tension on the blade, that plate dropped. Mine does not. Also, my blade still feels that it has a bit too much tautness yet on it, even after the tension is taken off.

So, Steel City HAS to get someone out here - and with the quickness.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Well, it was just yesterday morning that a repair person, from the outlet where I purchased my band saw, was authorized to come out to our home. It turned out that there was a burr on the casting, where that aluminum plate was supposed to freely slide through. He filed it flush, then applied a paste lubricant. I have not had a chance to put the bandsaw to the test, yet, but I am pretty sure that my blade tensioning woes are now behind me. Tomorrow, my glued up lamination will be good and ready, for my next bandsaw box and (hopefully) there will be no more tapered drawers.
 

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I love threads where the OP keeps coming back and delivering! Hope the repair gets your project back on track, nothing more frustrating than fighting with your tools over and over again. I don't even own a bandsaw yet and I'm learning lots from this thread :thumbup1:
 

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Well, it was just yesterday morning that a repair person, from the outlet where I purchased my band saw, was authorized to come out to our home. It turned out that there was a burr on the casting, where that aluminum plate was supposed to freely slide through. He filed it flush, then applied a paste lubricant. I have not had a chance to put the bandsaw to the test, yet, but I am pretty sure that my blade tensioning woes are now behind me.

You didn't test it while the technician was still there?
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
You didn't test it while the technician was still there?
He did, in a brief sense. neither of us could put the saw through a more extensive testing, because I only had a short period of time before having to take my daughter to college. It just so happens that I am now only about ten minutes from coming up out of my shop. I checked the tension on my blade, which seemed to be ok (according to Alex Snodgrass's procedure), and went about cutting out another bandsaw box. Well, the blade broke. Now, this is a relatively new blade and, in fact, the only other thing I had cut with it was a laminated block for a bandsaw box. Before starting out, I had checked the tensioning gauge indicator, just to see what it was set at. It happened to be just a hair under the setting denoted for a 3/4" blade. My blade, however, was just 1/4". Again, though, the tension only seemed proper when the gauge read at that higher position. Anything lower than that and my blade exhibited a progressively looser feel.

I don't know WHAT to do, now, but DO know that I cannot keep buying blades because of breakage - especially ones that had hardly been used. Methinks that I may have purchased a 'bad' band saw unit, and I really don't know HOW to go about zeroing in on what the actual problem is.
 

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I am really sorry to read about all of your frustration with your new bandsaw. This is supposed to be fun after all. I think we've all had times like this with a tool at one time or another. What part of the country do you live in? Perhaps someone on this forum would be willing to come over and help you. I know I would if you live anywhere close to the Denver area.
 

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try this blade

http://www.grizzly.com/catalog/2013/Main/118

maybe this one: http://www.grizzly.com/products/93-1-2-x-3-8-x-032-x-3-TPI-AS-S-Bandsaw-Blade/T25007

I've never had a Timberwolf blade break ...yet. I weld my own up to 5/8" wide with fairly good results. But I have ordered 1/2" and 3/4" from Grizzly also.

When tensioning the blade make certain to spin the wheels by hand and listen to the sound of the tension by plucking on the left side as you tighten the tension knob. You will hear the difference between a loose and tightened blade.

If you one of those lever type tensioning gizmos, that may be where the issue is, I donno? Maybe someone who has one can help you out with that. It should certainly be in the manual. I don't know if you can tension the blade in the "off" position, but I would think not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
I am really sorry to read about all of your frustration with your new bandsaw. This is supposed to be fun after all. I think we've all had times like this with a tool at one time or another. What part of the country do you live in? Perhaps someone on this forum would be willing to come over and help you. I know I would if you live anywhere close to the Denver area.
I live a pretty fair distance away from your Denver area, Mike (Amherst, NY), but I can't tell you how much I appreciate what you were saying. I always knew that woodworkers were a special breed, and you have just substantiated that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
http://www.grizzly.com/catalog/2013/Main/118

maybe this one: http://www.grizzly.com/products/93-1-2-x-3-8-x-032-x-3-TPI-AS-S-Bandsaw-Blade/T25007

I've never had a Timberwolf blade break ...yet. I weld my own up to 5/8" wide with fairly good results. But I have ordered 1/2" and 3/4" from Grizzly also.

When tensioning the blade make certain to spin the wheels by hand and listen to the sound of the tension by plucking on the left side as you tighten the tension knob. You will hear the difference between a loose and tightened blade.

If you one of those lever type tensioning gizmos, that may be where the issue is, I donno? Maybe someone who has one can help you out with that. It should certainly be in the manual. I don't know if you can tension the blade in the "off" position, but I would think not.
Woodthings,

Yes, I have always spun the wheels by hand, when journeying through the tensioning process. My band saw does have one of those tensioning levers, and I suspect that this is where the bulk of my issues lie. Even though we float above life's pressure points on my fixed income (medically retired), my wife gave me the go-ahead to invest in a much better blade. I do not remember where I saw it, but there was a carbide-tipped blade running in excess of $100 (my Olson All Pro, which just broke, was nearly $30), and I fear for the same thing happening to any blade that I outfit my bandsaw with - until such time as I am able to determine - and FIX - was the causative factor for previous breakage was.

I don't know about anyone else, but my little shop is this 'big kid's' playground, and I am really feeling the effects of not being able to get some work done. Hopefully, there will be a relatively easy fix for my dilemma.
 

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Thanks, Del. I will give your suggestion a shot, just as soon as I get back into my shop, a little later in the day. I am also interested in the Beall Tilt Box, and am going to search for more info, and pricing on it.
https://www.google.com/#q=beall+tilt+box

i use this tilt box on everthing that has a fence, even the drill press, just put box on bit zero it and put it on the fence and adjust, very good their is another tilt box but uses a different battery , i don't belive it is any better both your choice, check your square, the blade can't be square to the bed if the slug's won't slide in and out with forcing them, can't be any other thing, i have done a hundred or so, you can check with we will say a 8" or 9" tall piece of 2x4 depend's on the opening of the throat of the saw do a cut standing up and saw into the piece maybe 1" now take the piece and put the opening to the back of the blade it should slide in with out any force that mean's the blade to bed is good, now make sure the 2x4 is cut off at the bottom so it is like 90 degree piece of wood to start with, good luck del
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
@ Del:

Thanks for the information, as well as the link to that Tilt Box. From your description of it I had really expected it to be a fair bit more (cost-wise) than it is. In short order, I should have one of them joining my shop soon.

@ everyone:

I had been rather busy, attending to other matters, which is why I hadn't been back here to respond before now. But I can now say that situations have been traveling smoothly with my bandsaw. I have churned out a few more bandsaw boxes, since my last posting, and have even gained enough confidence in my bandsaw to have splurged on some better wood (Red Oak, and African Paudauk) - whereas before it had been Pine, or Poplar.

I am cutting with another Olson All-Pro 1/4" 6TPI blade, and did have to move about at a snail's pace. But I did get the box cut out, nicely, from that laminated block. I had read, somewhere, that a 1/4" 3TPI blade would best serve the cutouts from thicker wood pieces, but I can't seem to find one of those anywhere. I am using the Carter Stabilizer, now (and loving it), which handles a maximum blade width of 1/4".

But, can I really find a 3-TPI (hopefully, bi-metal) bandsaw blade in 1/4" width? Or was that previously read information erroneous?
 
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