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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last month I picked up my Steel City 14" Granite Deluxe Bandsaw and, today, went about the business of working on my very first bandsaw jewelry box. I followed the this tutorial (
), and was using the same width blade (1/4") as he. I had three 12"x9"x 4-3/4" laminated blocks of wood, which came from a old pine water frame base. Neither of the three attempts came out anywhere near right. In fact, the blocks were totally wrecked. First, it was a battle trying to cut the respective drawers out. And, when I did happen to get a drawer cut out (though not as evenly as I'd hoped) they wouldn't go back in right. I could push them in from the back side, but removing and replacing them from the front was nearly impossible. Cutting the back off of the jewelry box, before turning to the drawer cutouts, also proved to be quite a challenge. On two of the boxes, I got blade drift like crazy (I had used the fence for all three cutoffs, and it was the last two where the blade drifted in a rightward direction from the cut line. The first was spot on).

I had also made certain that the blade was square to the table, before starting out on these projects. Something is most definitely wrong, and I don't know if it is my bandsaw - or me.

Any ideas on what might be the possible causative factor, from what I have described?

Nathan
 

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Factory blades are usually "junk"

For the life of me I don't know why they sell a decent saw, then give you a crappy blade to use. Many manufacturers do this.:thumbdown:

Anyway, it's probably the blade, get a Timberwoff from Grizzly, Starret, Lenox, or Supercut ..... maybe an Olson from Woodcraft.

Get several because if you snap one .. you're done. One is none, two is better. Then watch this video:

Finally, wood will move, either open or close when you saw into a fairly thick piece and you won't have the same blade kerf as when you started. ..it may bind up. That's just the nature of some woods, it's not you or the bandsaw.
 

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I'll pick "dull blade", please.
My little Ryobi will cut like a dream only so long as the blade is sharp.
Then it drifts off to the left with a mind of it's own.
I have to make a 5 hr round trip into the city to get anything other than Pacific Rim crap.
Vermont American blades are very uneven = some blades last for 200 - 400 yards.
I don't think I got more than 50' from the last one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Are you sure the blade is tensioned properly? Could it be dull?
Very good question, and one that I don't have an authoritative answer for :smile:. I say that because I am yet a relative newbie at bandsaws. My first one (Jet 20") was here for just a very brief time, about a year or so ago. Financial hardship warranted my selling it. But I had never done much at all, with that unit, and only worked with 3/4" stock when I did get to it.

Proper tensioning? Again, I don't rightly know. I DO know that I have followed every tutorial that I could find, on tensioning. Today, while going out to find another blade, I revisited the local too outlet where I had purchased my saw from. Looking at the back of the display model (same model as mine) I noticed that its tensioning gauge was set much closer to the 3/8" setting - even thought he saw was outfitted with a 1/4" blade. I am wondering if my 1/4" set, for my gauge indicator, might not have afforded the tautness I may have needed.

Well, I picked up another blade (1/4" Olson All-Pro), and just finished installing it. I am waiting for another laminated block to cook, so that I can try - again - to come away with a bandsawn jewelry box. I am also going to set my tensioning a bit higher, to see how that works out.
 

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One is none, two is better. Then watch this video:
x
x
x
I learned more in this 35 minute video than I've taught myself in years. tyvm:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'll pick "dull blade", please.
I understand what you are saying, about a possible dull blade. But if that IS the case, then it is a shame that manufacturers put such crap on their products. Believe me, I hadn't much at all with that blade. Yes, I did try to cutout some jewelry box designs from a couple of thick, laminated stock. But that should not have caused the blade to lose its edge so quickly.
 

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I saw Alex Snodgrass at the last couple Woodworking Shows I attended. I followed the advice he gives in his clinic on bandsaw set-up. Made a big difference. I also picked up the Carter Guides...wow, turned my 10+ year old Ridgid into a whole new saw. I've got my first attempts at bandsawn boxes roughed out and it cut like a dream with the stabilizer.
 

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Last month I picked up my Steel City 14" Granite Deluxe Bandsaw and, today, went about the business of working on my very first bandsaw jewelry box. I followed the this tutorial (How to Make a Jewelry Box with a Bandsaw - Free Easy DIY Woodworking Project Plans - YouTube), and was using the same width blade (1/4") as he. I had three 12"x9"x 4-3/4" laminated blocks of wood, which came from a old pine water frame base. Neither of the three attempts came out anywhere near right. In fact, the blocks were totally wrecked. First, it was a battle trying to cut the respective drawers out. And, when I did happen to get a drawer cut out (though not as evenly as I'd hoped) they wouldn't go back in right. I could push them in from the back side, but removing and replacing them from the front was nearly impossible. Cutting the back off of the jewelry box, before turning to the drawer cutouts, also proved to be quite a challenge. On two of the boxes, I got blade drift like crazy (I had used the fence for all three cutoffs, and it was the last two where the blade drifted in a rightward direction from the cut line. The first was spot on).

I had also made certain that the blade was square to the table, before starting out on these projects. Something is most definitely wrong, and I don't know if it is my bandsaw - or me.

Any ideas on what might be the possible causative factor, from what I have described?

Nathan
i do band saw box's , sound's like the blade to bed is not a true 90 degrees to start with, watch this video and than fix the saw .
 

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I was thinking the same thing as Del - the blade is out of square with the table and your cuts are tapered. I agree with everyone that the Snodgrass video is excellent, but as a quick check, just put a square on your table next to the flat side of your blade and see it it's running true.

Bill
 

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I love this thread....

Three separate posts of the snodgrass video. :blink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I was thinking the same thing as Del - the blade is out of square with the table and your cuts are tapered. I agree with everyone that the Snodgrass video is excellent, but as a quick check, just put a square on your table next to the flat side of your blade and see it it's running true.

Bill
Yes, I had indeed run a check for blade to table squareness, and everything was spot on. In fact, after installing my new blade, and setting my bearings and tension as proper as I possibly could, I ran a check for squareness. Again, all proved to be right on the money. I just recently completed the cutout for my first (successful) bandsaw box, and found that I am still getting somewhat of a tapered cut. Nit as bad as before, with the other blade, but enough to prevent fluid movement of some of the drawers. It took a fair bit of sanding to make a difference in those conditions. The blade/table are square to one another, and I am not forcing the blade through the cut. So I don't know WHAT is going on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
i do band saw box's , sound's like the blade to bed is not a true 90 degrees to start with, watch this video and than fix the saw . Band Saw Clinic with Alex Snodgrass - YouTube
I have Mr. Snodgrass's video tutorials burned to DVD, and watch him often. He surely does provide a lot of helpful information. I had even bought the Carter Stabilizer, on the strength of what he'd shown in one of his videos. Sadly, however, it will have to be sent back for refund, because it proved to be really inferior to my stock bearings. I do believe that there may be something not quite right with my bandsaw, and am going to request the visitation of a technician to my home, from Steel City.
 

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Yes, I had indeed run a check for blade to table squareness, and everything was spot on. In fact, after installing my new blade, and setting my bearings and tension as proper as I possibly could, I ran a check for squareness. Again, all proved to be right on the money. I just recently completed the cutout for my first (successful) bandsaw box, and found that I am still getting somewhat of a tapered cut. Nit as bad as before, with the other blade, but enough to prevent fluid movement of some of the drawers. It took a fair bit of sanding to make a difference in those conditions. The blade/table are square to one another, and I am not forcing the blade through the cut. So I don't know WHAT is going on.
set the square to the back of the blade also, not just the side to bed, that is the only way a tapper slug or box part can be that way, you probly will have to loosen up the nut that is is on the back side of the trunnion to do this also loosen up the other one a little also, put a tappered piece of wood, they make plastic one that you can buy but you can get away with wood, just don't snug it real tight, but enough so the bed doesn't tilt, if you had a beall tilt box you could get the bed to blade right at the 90 degree's, that is what i use , it is also used on all my machines that have bed's and drill press also , good luck make all the measurement's 90 and you will be good to go
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
set the square to the back of the blade also, not just the side to bed, that is the only way a tapper slug or box part can be that way, you probly will have to loosen up the nut that is is on the back side of the trunnion to do this also loosen up the other one a little also, put a tappered piece of wood, they make plastic one that you can buy but you can get away with wood, just don't snug it real tight, but enough so the bed doesn't tilt, if you had a beall tilt box you could get the bed to blade right at the 90 degree's, that is what i use , it is also used on all my machines that have bed's and drill press also , good luck make all the measurement's 90 and you will be good to go

Thanks, Del. I will give your suggestion a shot, just as soon as I get back into my shop, a little later in the day. I am also interested in the Beall Tilt Box, and am going to search for more info, and pricing on it.
 

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One is none, two is better. Then watch this video:

x
x
x
I learned more in this 35 minute video than I've taught myself in years. tyvm:thumbsup:
Zaklee. Now if the software on this site was worth a damn :no: this video would be a "sticky" under "saw setup"
 

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There are possible reasons why you can't get good cuts with your saw. It could be feed and speed rate,blade tension,
blade quality and blades size.
Have you taken the time to Tune UP your saw?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Have you taken the time to Tune UP your saw?
Yes. That was done before my very first run of the saw. But I have also undergone that process again, since then. As far as checking for squareness, this time I followed Alex's suggestion more closely. I used a section of wood, to make a blade kerf in. I then sent that cut to the back of the blade to see if it inserted into that kerf. It did, without the slightest obstruction. So, by that, my setup is indeed squared.
 

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9 times out of 10, it's the blade

Assuming proper setup of the saw, it's probably the dang blade. :yes:
I've had new blades drift and cut to one side faster than the other...like NASCAR only turns well left... won't turn right etc.


If you are using a 1/4" wide blade for your bandsaw boxes with tight radius turns, make certain the guides are only 1/2 way into the gullets, no further. Make certain the tension is "greater" than you think it should be. Don't count on the red washer on the back. Open the cover exposing the blade on the left side. With your thumb, "thunk" the blade and listen for a solid tone, not a dull flutter. A musical ear will help here, but I can't tell you what note if should be, although I did measure it one time with a tuning meter. Make certain the blade has an aggressive set to the teeth... 6 TPI or fewer.

If bandsaw boxes are "your thing" order several 1/4" blades from a Lennox or Starrett distributor and have them shipped to your home.
 
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