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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am refinishing the makeup table shown below. Normally I never topcoat an interior area with an oil-based topcoat but the lines and edges on this piece are round and so I am forced to use oil-based inside.

The second picture shows that there are small gaps at each end of the hinge for the top (white ovals) and a continuous 1/4" gap (caused by bumper pads) along the front of the top.

Will these gaps allow sufficient air flow to avoid any issue with using oil-based topcoat on the inside?

Thank you.

Gary


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but the lines and edges on this piece are round and so I am forced to use oil-based inside.
I don’t understand this and also have never heard of this.

If you’re finishing it inside your house, I would use a water based product, such as polyurethane or polyacrylic. They will also dry much more rapidly than oil based.

Ideally you would spray it, which puts you outside, in which case my first choice woukd be lacquer, either a water based (Target Coatings) or the really thing.
 

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I assume you are concerned with the finish gassing and an odor being inside. I know I am in the minority here, but I'd do the inside with shellac. Probably a spray can, but you could also brush. When the alcohol dries, it is cured and there shouldn't be an odor. As long as there won't be any moisture inside the table, it should be fine. Plus, it is easy to apply more coats down the road if you need to. 20+ years ago I was looking for a finish for a baby crib. The chemist (or whatever he was called) at a large finish manufacturing company told me to use shellac (safety reasons if chewed, but my question to him was how long a finish off-gases before it is safe to put an infant in the crib). I was impressed with his honesty because his company didn't make or sell shellac.
 

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I'm confused by why you think you are forced to use an oil based finish. Also, by your last statement, I'm guessing your concerns are about using an oil based finish on the inside of the work piece; not necessarily the inside of your house.
With so many good water based finishes on the market these days, you should never consider yourself "forced" to use one type of finish over another. You have choices.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I don’t understand this and also have never heard of this.

If you’re finishing it inside your house, I would use a water based product, such as polyurethane or polyacrylic. They will also dry much more rapidly than oil based.

Ideally you would spray it, which puts you outside, in which case my first choice woukd be lacquer, either a water based (Target Coatings) or the really thing.
This is the inside of an antique. I do not have spray capability.

My question is whether or not there will be enough air circulation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I assume you are concerned with the finish gassing and an odor being inside. I know I am in the minority here, but I'd do the inside with shellac. Probably a spray can, but you could also brush. When the alcohol dries, it is cured and there shouldn't be an odor. As long as there won't be any moisture inside the table, it should be fine. Plus, it is easy to apply more coats down the road if you need to. 20+ years ago I was looking for a finish for a baby crib. The chemist (or whatever he was called) at a large finish manufacturing company told me to use shellac (safety reasons if chewed, but my question to him was how long a finish off-gases before it is safe to put an infant in the crib). I was impressed with his honesty because his company didn't make or sell shellac.
I cannot top coat the inside with other than oil based which is what I use on the outside. I am worried about the finish gassing but I do not know if there will be enough air circulation to avoid the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm confused by why you think you are forced to use an oil based finish. Also, by your last statement, I'm guessing your concerns are about using an oil based finish on the inside of the work piece; not necessarily the inside of your house.
With so many good water based finishes on the market these days, you should never consider yourself "forced" to use one type of finish over another. You have choices.
I am "forced" based on the structure of the antique. Don't know if air circulation will address my concern.
 

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Why do you have to use oil "based on the structure of the antique"? And even if you do, there is no reason you can't use something different on the inside. You could use shellac or a water based varnish on the inside, let it dry and then do the outside with oil based. There should be no issues with that.
However, the best way to put a finish on anything is to take it apart and leave everything in the open until the new finish cures. Yes. If you put oil based finish on the inside and then close it up, it will smell for quite a while. So. Don't do it that way whether you use water or oil based.
 

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I am refinishing the makeup table shown below. Normally I never topcoat an interior area with an oil-based topcoat but the lines and edges on this piece are round and so I am forced to use oil-based inside.

The second picture shows that there are small gaps at each end of the hinge for the top (white ovals) and a continuous 1/4" gap (caused by bumper pads) along the front of the top.

Will these gaps allow sufficient air flow to avoid any issue with using oil-based topcoat on the inside?

Thank you.

Gary


View attachment 441095 View attachment 441096
i don't believe you will have much of a problem with offgassing of the finish. An oil based poly should make a good finish for the table. Once it has dried a couple months you could spill nail polish remover on the finish and would be able to wipe it off before it damaged the finish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
i don't believe you will have much of a problem with offgassing of the finish. An oil based poly should make a good finish for the table. Once it has dried a couple months you could spill nail polish remover on the finish and would be able to wipe it off before it damaged the finish.
Thanks for the feedback, Steve. I will suggest to the customer to leave the top up and open for quite a while to fully cure the oil-based finish.
 
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