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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, new to the forum. I have a very old table that has been abused a bit over the years. It's somewhere between 120 and 200 years old. I believe it has been lacquered, as the finish is considerably darker where it has not been worn away.
Anyway, the whole thing needs to be refinished, but rather than reapplying whatever dark varnishy stuff is already on it, I want a more natural wood look. So, once I've got all that stripped and sanded off, I want to replicate something I saw on a very old table in a pub in England. The old pub table had the soft grain worn away by hundreds of years of hands, dishrags, and beer mugs, leaving a soft but very noticeable texture. Google tells me this is called dishout. All I can find are ways to avoid dishout when buffing a wood floor. I want to know how to cause it on purpose.
From the "how not to do it" sites, I gather that a flexible sanding pad and going against the grain may help, but I'm wondering if anyone knows how to really differentiate the grains.
Thanks!
 

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Half a bubble off.. {Θ¿Θ}
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Good Morning Meadmaster & welcome to the forums.
My first thought would be a sandblaster with a soft medium like ground walnut shells.
Another choice might be a pressure washer.
Experiment in a hidden spot but I think either would tend to carry away some of the softer wood between growth rings.
Try it on a piece of wood that has similar hardness & grain pattern to see it it gets you the effect you're looking for.
Post a few pictures of the project as you progress..
..Jon..
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. I don't have access to a sandblasted right now. Mostly, I have my hands available. I've put pictures of the table into an album, but linking to them from my iPad is a hassle.
 

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You could consider the twisted knot steel brush in conjunction with a portable drill or for a much higher speed and possibly more aggressive approach the cupped brush in conjunction with a right angle grinder. I would do some experimenting with either on other similar wood material before making a decision if either are feasible. Safety glasses recommended, especially with the cupped wheel.
 

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