Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've tore down my old Craftsman jointer Model # 113.20680, and purchased a set of bearings to replace the existing ones. The bearings I got are the same part number: 6022Z bearing.
The problem I've run into is the fact that the new bearings absolutely will not go on the shaft. Upon inspection, I can see that the inside diameter portion of the bearing, on the new ones, is thicker than the old bearings.

Anyone ever have this one before? I'm welcoming solutions, and have a few in mind. Just can't believe the same part# will not fit. :no:

Thanks for sharing your experience with me.

cey146
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
29,965 Posts

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
29,965 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
pidaster,

I just found this out from an ebayer, yesterday. He was quite helpful, pointing out that a 6202Z bearing is made with a 15mm id, as well as a 16mm id. No wonder I couldn't get that thing tapped onto the shaft. :furious:

Why someone ever allowed the bearing numbers to be the same, is beyond me. Anyway, for the ebayer's help, I rewarded him with an order. :thumbsup:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,168 Posts
Cry, when I am rebuilding my motorcycles and come to the bearing replacement part, I put e new bearings in the freezer for about 15-20 minutes. I use a heat gun to warm up the recess in the case where they fit just to the point where it's warm to the touch. Bearings go in real easy without having to hammer them.
Mike Hawkins;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,239 Posts
I've tore down my old Craftsman jointer Model # 113.20680, and purchased a set of bearings to replace the existing ones. The bearings I got are the same part number: 6022Z bearing.
The problem I've run into is the fact that the new bearings absolutely will not go on the shaft. Upon inspection, I can see that the inside diameter portion of the bearing, on the new ones, is thicker than the old bearings.

Anyone ever have this one before? I'm welcoming solutions, and have a few in mind. Just can't believe the same part# will not fit. :no:

Thanks for sharing your experience with me.

cey146
their should be number stamp on the beiring, take it to a beiring shop and have it match up, i have done this , they can measure the out side and inside and get the right one, if it is a good shop and they may have a place their to press the new one on ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
their should be number stamp on the beiring, take it to a beiring shop and have it match up, i have done this , they can measure the out side and inside and get the right one, if it is a good shop and they may have a place their to press the new one on ?

Good old Harvey brothers worked for me. Took my table saw arbor there and they put the bearings on for under $20 including the bearings. (Harvey brothers is an electric motor place that I mention to see if Del remembers it)

I know stuff like that is easy but for something that I want right the first time I like to take it to someone that does that kind of thing everyday.
 

·
puffessional Scrabbleist
Joined
·
155 Posts
another fix...

Cry, when I am rebuilding my motorcycles and come to the bearing replacement part, I put e new bearings in the freezer for about 15-20 minutes. I use a heat gun to warm up the recess in the case where they fit just to the point where it's warm to the touch. Bearings go in real easy without having to hammer them.
Mike Hawkins

Good method. I do this and sometimes use a bit of canned freeze-spray. Cold also works to shrink o-rings. With the spray you have to wait a few minutes before shrinking takes place. Freezer is best.

TonyM
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top