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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's good fun and a steep learning curve. Not too difficult and sometimes difficult to imagine what the inside will look like when it isn't on the outside?

This is a heart shape

Wood Single-lens reflex camera Hardwood Wooden block Plywood


And finished up looking quite nice IMHO

Table Wood Hat Twig Plant


A 3 piece

Natural material Wood Headgear Serveware Art
Finial Wood Art Artifact Ornament


I didn't like the blue candle so I made a red one.

Then I went totally mad a did an 8 piece. That nearly drove me up the wall!

Wood Art Hat Artifact Finial


That will be a one off!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Not so difficult if you stick to 2 bits for a while and the heart isn't bad. A little difficult to get up in to the top and get your head around that you need to go quite deep.

If you look at the first photo you can see that and there is a cart load of youtube on it.

Try, the worst you get is some more firewood. Oh and when you flip the blank inside out glue the halves together with some card between them. It makes them easier to split. I always wrap some gaffer tape around the ends for the belt and braces feeling, with Steb type centers at each end.

You can do lovely single stem flower vases too

Vase Wood Serveware Drinkware Artifact
Plant Window Flowerpot Wood Tree


They use such small lumps of our wood. After all, just remember it ain't like money, it don't grow on trees you know ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That's difficult to guess at that Pellikan? The hearts above, left is oak and right is ?? and fairly woodworm munched and they both obviously survives. I use Steb centres at both ends as they don't put any pressurs of a point on either end. These are they and obviously again a live Steb at the tail stock. A bit expensive, but I use them all the time for spindle turning.


Also, too much pressure from the tail stock may have been the problem? Just a thought, you said "I still had about 3/8" thick in the fattest area, I thought that was enough." Did you mean the fattest or thinnest? Because if you went thinner then it would have made both my points even more likely?
 

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That's difficult to guess at that Pellikan? The hearts above, left is oak and right is ?? and fairly woodworm munched and they both obviously survives. I use Steb centres at both ends as they don't put any pressurs of a point on either end. These are they and obviously again a live Steb at the tail stock. A bit expensive, but I use them all the time for spindle turning.


Also, too much pressure from the tail stock may have been the problem? Just a thought, you said "I still had about 3/8" thick in the fattest area, I thought that was enough." Did you mean the fattest or thinnest? Because if you went thinner then it would have made both my points even more likely?
Thanks for the reply. I use a steb at the head and a cup shaped live center at the tail.

It's difficult to describe but here goes. I was trying to make a Christmas ornament with 4 pieces. I turned the inside part and that went fine. After I flipped the wood around and started on the outside the individual spokes of the ornament became roughly football shaped in cross section. The thickness in the center of the football was about 3/8" and it tapered to points.
Possibly I just had a catch. At the time the wood broke apart it was firmly glued together on the ends so it didn't come apart, the wood broke. I thought maybe the oak wasn't a good wood for the project, having open grain led to less stability.
If I'm going to try again maybe a denser wood or more speed or thicker spokes. It was my first, and so far last, try. I do want to try again, thus the question. Trying to get a better sense of what went wrong.
 
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