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Just getting started
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone used the Infinity Tools Mega-Rabbeting set? I bought it and have been having problems using it, even though it should be pretty straight forward.

The problem I am having is that the bearings do not seat themselves properly and therefore actually hit the carbide tip. After lengthy discussions with customer service, they sent me new bearings. This seemed to work to a degree, except that now some of the larger diameter bearings, literally, rest on top of the carbide tips.

I like to think I am somewhat mechanically inclined and cannot make heads or tails of this. Surely, the design is not that flawed. Anyway, just curious if anyone has used this set and if so, if they had any similar problems.
 

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Old Methane Gas Cloud
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Normally there is a washer or two that need to be in place before the bearing is attached.
 

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Just getting started
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The set came with one washer and according to their instructions that washer sits on top. I have setup the bit exactly as described and am still having problems. It is driving me crazy because they assure me, it should work fine.
 

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John
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Hi Dan - Maybe you have a defective bit. From the looks of the picture, there should be a boss machined into the bit to space the bearing up. Maybe it's just a thick spacer but looks like something should be there.:yes:
 

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Just getting started
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
There is a step there for the bearing to rest on. The problem is that this set has smaller bearings in aluminum sleeves held in by a c-clip. My initial problem was that the c-clip would rest on that step, throwing the bearing out of balance. They sent me know bearings with smaller c-clips that would not interfere with that step and they don't. But now, the bearing sits to low on the pilot causing interference with the carbide tips.
 

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John
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There is a step there for the bearing to rest on. The problem is that this set has smaller bearings in aluminum sleeves held in by a c-clip. My initial problem was that the c-clip would rest on that step, throwing the bearing out of balance. They sent me know bearings with smaller c-clips that would not interfere with that step and they don't. But now, the bearing sits to low on the pilot causing interference with the carbide tips.
I think I would just add a small washer underneath the bearing. Odds are the first set you had were fine. I don't understand the "out-of-balance" concern. It is very difficult to affect the balance that close to the axis of rotation, especially at the relatively low mass and rotation speeds involved.:smile:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I am not sure as to whether adding a washer would do it or not. My primary concern is should I need to add a washer. I am setting it exactly as they show in there video. It should work without the washer. I have added a picture to show what I mean when I say out of balance.
 

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Just getting started
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I just received a response from customer service regarding this issue. They said the carbide would cut through the aluminum sleeve no problem and to just do it. They said it is designed this way intentionally, allowing them to use the same size bearings and sleeves. It saves them money and therefore the consumer. I guess I will give it a go.
 

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John
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I just received a response from customer service regarding this issue. They said the carbide would cut through the aluminum sleeve no problem and to just do it. They said it is designed this way intentionally, allowing them to use the same size bearings and sleeves. It saves them money and therefore the consumer. I guess I will give it a go.
:eek:Sounds like kind of a strange way of designing something to me.
I see what you were saying, not necessarily out of balance but out of square with the bit. Would make me nervous too.
If they gave you the go ahead, I'd try it on some scrap and see what happens. I don't really see a safety issue but be careful anyway...
Good Luck.:smile:
 

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where's my table saw?
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somethin ain't right

I just received a response from customer service regarding this issue. They said the carbide would cut through the aluminum sleeve no problem and to just do it. They said it is designed this way intentionally, allowing them to use the same size bearings and sleeves. It saves them money and therefore the consumer. I guess I will give it a go.
I watched the video... 1:22 .... and see no reason the bearing should not sit correctly on the 1/4" shaft with the washer and screw to retain it. It should not be crooked as shown in your photo. If you have tried other different size/diameter bearings and they all sit crooked, the shaft is bent, return it. I don't think they are understanding your issue. I'd return it anyway for a different set. JMO

 

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Registered
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I have several of the Infinity bits and have never had an issue with them. Their office is just a few miles across town from me and I've been there a couple of times to pick things up. They have always been great to work with any time I had a question or a problem.

From the sound of your original post, they sent you a new set of bearings without a matched cutter. They sell just the bearings or just the bit separately. However, I would not recommend buying them that way. One never really knows if the bearings are different in the bearing kit opposed to the bearing and bit set.

Also, If you are trying to make a rabbit that leaves only a portion of the carbide exposed during the cut, maybe you really need to be using a different bit and setup in the first place. Perhaps something like a bit and fence setup without a bearing to get what you want.
 
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