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Hunter
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My front door wasn't catching good because the frame is out of square making the door sag. I had worked on it before and stripped one of the screws pretty badly. I wasn't sure I would even be able to get the screw out, but I had to do something with it.

So I got my new impact driver that I just got for Father's Day and snugged the bit down in the screw as far as I could. When I hit the trigger that screw just backed right out. I was pretty amazed.

I went ahead and threw the screw away, bit I'm pretty sure I could have put it back in the hole with no problem.

This little thing has been great. It's tiny compared to my cordless drill so it fits in tight places, but it sure has a lot of power.

Hunter
 

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I just bought one of these.

Although I haven't used it much yet its seems as if it will be just the ticket for lots of tasks.

One in particular would be during my occasional cabinet installations.

After aligning and clamping face frames I drill counter sunk pilot holes and wax the screws before driving them in.

My concern is that the impact driver will be more likely to break the screws than my regular cordless drill.

Thoughts on this anyone?

What do you ID owners typically use them for?
 

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I occasionally need to adjust an interior or exterior door if its rubbing the jamb, the locksets don't engage properly or the reveal between the door and jamb is uneven.

I first try these adjustments at the hinges by pulling the jamb to the RO with long deck screws in place of the original hinge screws.

Also, When installing an exterior door hardware and to provide extra strength at the deadbolt strike plate I replace the short screws with deck screws

It seems like an ID would be a good tool for this as well.
 

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John
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I've got an old lawn mower and last year had to replace the recoil starter which involves removing the flywheel nut. If anyone has had to do that job on an old 2 or 4 cycle engine you will be able to relate. Long story short, my impact spun that nut off in about 2 seconds. No pry bars jamming the flywheel or anything, just a couple of bangs and it spun off.:smile:
I also use it when I need to pull a wheel off the car for some reason. I do get out the torque wrench for the final tightening though.
 

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I got a little 10.8V Hitachi a couple years ago and the thing is amazing. I find myself often using 2"-3" screws where I never would before because I could never drive them by hand and even a good drill/driver wouldn't do the job. Like Jharris is planning, I used it to square up a new front door - in fact I framed the whole thing using screws and the driver instead of nails. Deck builders must love them. Makes me wonder how I got along without it!

If you never tried one guys, you're in for a treat!

One thing: I haven't snapped any screws with mine but stock up on 'impact ready' bits because you are going to break one from time to time.

Bill
 

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AND we can thank Holmes on Homes. I first saw him using it, and went why did I never know this. Our crew uses a lot of them.
 

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Thanks Bill,

Can I get the bits you mention at Lowes or HD?
 

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where's my table saw?
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they are the only way to drive screws!

I used to drive 3" screws with just the drill, no impact driver. I'd break them, stall them, strip them etc. After getting a Dewalt 18 V impact driver I couldn't be without one....them came a 18 V Milwaukee, and finally an 18 V Rigid ... now that one is the KING of impacts. My son uses his like an air impart at the GM dealer for removing nuts and bolts. Incredible power! The bits are so easy to get at the Home Depot and are usually on sale. Don't get the Ryobi bits, they aren't as strong as Milwaukee or Rigid.
 
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I have three different 18v impact drivers. Older dewalt first edition, which still works after many years of hanging garage doors, cabinet installs, deck screws, etc. Just got a new dewalt to replace it in case it dies. New one is a little more compact, has a light, and a better chuck. You don't have to pull it back to insert a bit. I also have two ryobis actually, but I dropped one off a ladder onto concrete and it broke the case around the trigger area. The ryobis work fine, but not quite as powerful as the dewalts, even though they are both 18v. As far as using them for cabinet installs, you just have to have a light trigger finger. You can feel the screw seat and hear the difference in the sound of the gun's chatter. Just stop at that point. The trigger's are variable speed, sort of, so just start to ease off right before the screw seats. Great tools, most used by far of all my cordless stuff.
Mike Hawkins;)
 

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Jharris asked: <<Can I get the bits you mention at Lowes or HD? >>

Yep! Get spares because the impact ready ones can break, too. Different lengths are helpful, also.

I got an 18V Ryobi impact driver as part of a drill kit. I haven't used it much because my Hitachi is smaller and lighter. I did use the Ryobi on some automotive work and it did fine so now it's in the garage.

Warner said: <<I hate using them. It's the noise that drives me up the wall >> Are you referring to the cordless electric impact drivers like we're discussing or the air impact wrenches like mechanics use? They are the noisy ones.

Bill
 
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