Woodworking Talk banner
21 - 35 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Termite
Joined
·
4,515 Posts
byawks.... have you thought about trying Woodweb?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
2) I recently read that some objects made of wood become stronger as they age. Is this true? Here's the quote: "They knew which woods would shrink and which would expand with age, so that these woods, when correctly combined, would make the chair stronger over time.
I'd like others' more experienced thoughts on this.

From my basic wood knowledge: joints will expand and contract. Some joints, properly designed and built, will get tighter across time (stronger chair?).

Wood will sponge-up moisture, and exhale it. With this in/out across the year's seasons, the wood expands and contracts depending on what dimension you're measuring it.

StumpyNubs has a great video on this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
I'd like others' more experienced thoughts on this.

From my basic wood knowledge: joints will expand and contract. Some joints, properly designed and built, will get tighter across time (stronger chair?).

Wood will sponge-up moisture, and exhale it. With this in/out across the year's seasons, the wood expands and contracts depending on what dimension you're measuring it.

StumpyNubs has a great video on this.
That statement is specific to a certain type of chair joined with green wood. Rustic and Windsor chairs specifically are made with round tenons that are dried using a makeshift kiln (sometimes hot sand in a bucket). Thre dry tenons are inserted into a mortise in a wet seat piece. As the seat dries, it shrinks, and the back splats and legs swell to form a tight joint.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
229 Posts
3) A more broad question: The story is about a guy who dreams of being a masterful woodworker (sort of like the examples you've shared so far), but at the beginning of the story he can't achieve this goal because of his own lack of integrity/objectivity/follow-through. Ironically, he has more natural talent than most people, but his character flaws cause him to drop the ball on basic things. He's a little like an aspiring athlete who dreams of going pro and has the talent to be a superstar, but he's too disorganized to make it to the games. Any ideas on how a lack of basic integrity/objectivity might prevent a person from becoming a masterful woodworker?

Something you have to accept when you work on a building is that you work ultimately to support someone else's design vision. It's not the same as a designer/craftsman who makes furniture. When I had a shop that made windows and doors, I knew I was making a component of a larger creation. I worked off someone else's plans and had value mainly as a technical resource--this was both machinists expertise and knowledge of small details like joint drainage peculiar to window construction. Windows especially straddle the line between a piece of furniture and an appliance. They don't have a power cord, but they get an Energy Star rating just like a water heater. They can't leak in a rainstorm. There's no room for individual egos in this side of the industry since where people see value is in brand name appliances with assured performance. You have to be humble in this line of work.

The door industry is different. Entry doors especially are seen in aesthetic terms as a piece of furniture. There's perceived value in the work of an individual craftsman. Door projects produce markedly fewer disgruntled customers. So long as you understand how to keep them from warping, doors are more fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #26 ·
This is all just wonderful help, guys. It's been invaluable to talk with actual woodworkers. I'm sure as the story progresses, I'll have the need to research. I especially like the suggestion to actually do some woodworking myself, if only to have some firsthand experience of what I'll be writing about. Thanks again!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
I haven’t read all the other suggestions but a DeVince would be wood carving, by hand as opposed to CNC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #28 ·
I haven’t read all the other suggestions but a DeVince would be wood carving, by hand as opposed to CNC
That's an interesting idea. I hadn't thought of that. What sorts of things would you carve by hand?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,324 Posts
I haven’t read all the other suggestions but a DeVince would be wood carving, by hand as opposed to CNC
you may be right, i didn't know him...

i consider the cnc another tool in my toolbox. it takes away the hand-formed effort from woodworking, similar to the table saw, jointer, planer, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
you may be right, i didn't know him...

i consider the cnc another tool in my toolbox. it takes away the hand-formed effort from woodworking, similar to the table saw, jointer, planer, etc.
I'm the complete opposite of Tim, I want to touch & feel every part of the project standing on my feet, bending over the bench, creating/problem solving as I go. I have no desire to sit and work a mouse. I think it's a right brain vs. left brain thing. Why some people are good with math and some are good with history or english.

" ...but at the beginning of the story he can't achieve this goal because of his own lack of integrity/objectivity/follow-through. Ironically, he has more natural talent than most people, but his character flaws cause him to drop the ball on basic things. He's a little like an aspiring athlete who dreams of going pro and has the talent to be a superstar, but he's too disorganized to make it to the games."

The above pretty much describes me. I think of myself having a good amount of natural talent. I'm no master and never will be. I don't think I have enough of the gift or the drive to get to a place where I could even begin to think of myself as a master.

The majority of my life consists of being in a rat race, going 100 miles an hour, I get irritated by people holding me up. I cut the grass but don't edge or blow off the walks. I do the dishes but don't wash that last two glasses or pot. I fold half the laundry, my whole house in never clean at one time. I wash the car but the bucket sits in the driveway for a week.

Then I step into the shop one or two days a week. The tools are always in order, they are not dull or rusty. I sweep and dust tools after I'm done for the day. I seem to recharge my batteries, it's a place where I'm the most happy. I'm hyper sensitive to flaws in my work. It's a place where I almost become a different person. Maybe it' the same feeling some folks get from going to church on Sundays. When my brain is going 100 mph and I can't sleep, I learned two things to think of that help me sleep, woodworking and scuba diving. (no I'm not bat sh** crazy as what I may seem)

Hopefully there may be something here to be of use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #32 ·
I'm the complete opposite of Tim, I want to touch & feel every part of the project standing on my feet, bending over the bench, creating/problem solving as I go. I have no desire to sit and work a mouse. I think it's a right brain vs. left brain thing. Why some people are good with math and some are good with history or english.

" ...but at the beginning of the story he can't achieve this goal because of his own lack of integrity/objectivity/follow-through. Ironically, he has more natural talent than most people, but his character flaws cause him to drop the ball on basic things. He's a little like an aspiring athlete who dreams of going pro and has the talent to be a superstar, but he's too disorganized to make it to the games."

The above pretty much describes me. I think of myself having a good amount of natural talent. I'm no master and never will be. I don't think I have enough of the gift or the drive to get to a place where I could even begin to think of myself as a master.

The majority of my life consists of being in a rat race, going 100 miles an hour, I get irritated by people holding me up. I cut the grass but don't edge or blow off the walks. I do the dishes but don't wash that last two glasses or pot. I fold half the laundry, my whole house in never clean at one time. I wash the car but the bucket sits in the driveway for a week.

Then I step into the shop one or two days a week. The tools are always in order, they are not dull or rusty. I sweep and dust tools after I'm done for the day. I seem to recharge my batteries, it's a place where I'm the most happy. I'm hyper sensitive to flaws in my work. It's a place where I almost become a different person. Maybe it' the same feeling some folks get from going to church on Sundays. When my brain is going 100 mph and I can't sleep, I learned two things to think of that help me sleep, woodworking and scuba diving. (no I'm not bat sh** crazy as what I may seem)

Hopefully there may be something here to be of use.
That's a fascinating self-portrait. Thanks for being so open! Man, can I relate to that. I also think that much of what you said bears on the story character I have in mind. He's in one sense a contradiction, since he has big passionate dreams but also thwarts himself by his moment-by-moment choices. The story will be about him getting his act together, for lack of a better term.

I'm a lot like you, as I'm not usually a meticulous person and will happily let dishes lie around or neglect the laundry for a while. But when doing certain things (in my case, usually a creative project) I'll suddenly savor the process, fuss over details, and neglect nothing. It's like I become a different person. Maybe we all have a little of that tendency within us.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,324 Posts
I'm the complete opposite of Tim, ...
you don't use any power tools? based on the threads on this forum, i am guessing that the majority of folks here use them. all i was saying is that the cnc is just one more (power) tool, which removes our hands from the wood to some degree (similar to a jointer, table saw, etc.).
my hats off to you for not using any!!!
 

·
Registered
Egg Spurt
Joined
·
2,748 Posts
I'm probably a bit different..I dunno.. I leave messes everywhere as I work and often bite off more than I can chew but don't quit until the job is done even if it means I'm working for peanuts. I'm generous to a fault with my customers and I'm a real sap for a hard luck story, but I still won't quit on a customer unless they quit on me. I often talk about getting tough with people and charging a lot more, but I hear those hard luck stories and it goes right out the window for me. I've been down that road of hard luck and have had people help me even when I probably didn't deserve the help so I'm always trying to pay it forward in some way or another.
I've made quite a few pieces of furniture for people who have lost everything and don't charge a dime then realize I'm going broke in the process..
Oh well.. I'm happy with who I am with how I treat people..
 
  • Like
Reactions: woodnthings

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
you may be right, i didn't know him...

i consider the cnc another tool in my toolbox. it takes away the hand-formed effort from woodworking, similar to the table saw, jointer, planer, etc.
I was a CNC machining guru for many years, mills lathes and grinders. I had dreams of making complex 3D wood things with a CNC Router when I retired. Well, I retired 3 years ago and realized I will never have the $$$ for CNC anything so I've been perfecting my manual skills ever since. Having been a 6Sigma Green Belt learned, taught and audited 5S in machine shops so I designed my shop to sort of meet those standards, BUT it is still hard to find that pencil I just put down.
 
21 - 35 of 35 Posts
Top