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Bsmith72
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I received this lathe last week as a gift. I am super excited about this but i'm having trouble identifying the model/specs. The serial number is 53-7452. Everything except a couple of handles on the tail stock are functional. Once I can identify it I can start order or fabricating parts for this unit. Any help with this will be truly appreciated as well as any advice on what and where to order these items. I've immersed myself into woodworking this year and cant get enough of it. Advice, tips, trick, do's dont's are all welcome.


P.s..... To be honest I've acquired a ton of tools in recent months (band-saws (delta & craftsman), planer,lathe (delta),miter saw(dewalt), drill press(craftsman, central machinery), chainsaw (stihl m361) etc etc...... I am a rookie and need someone to take me under their wing (hypothetically) and teach me some things.

Brandon
 

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It's a wood lathe for turning spindles and bowls... The different size pulleys on the end changes the speed of the spinning wood. Looks like a drill chuck on the end... I'm sure it can be swapped out for a different chuck or plate etc.

Sorry, I should have read your write up 1st. I told you what you already know... I'm sure someone can be of more help on that old Delta lathe. Welcome to the site... lots of helpful folks hang out here.
 

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where's my table saw?
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It a nice spindle lathe but .....

It won't be much use for turning bowls, but will turn spindles with some extra gear. You will need an adjustable chuck and or a faceplate to secure the work at the pulley end. The drill chuck won't do for any turning unless they are already round and less than 1/2" in diameter.

You need to measure how many threads on that arbor are within a 1" length to get the correct chuck and faceplate. I wouldn't spend much on this lathe, just enough to get started and see how much you like turning.

If it did not come with any turning tools, that will be another expense. Harbor Fright has a cheap set to get started. I bought this set years ago, but I don't do much wood turning. These are really low cost, but you can get better on Ebay:
https://www.harborfreight.com/wood-lathe-turning-tool-kit-8-pc-62674.html
 
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A lathe like that one was my first woodworking tool, it is a pretty good old lathe the heard stock is a 1" 8tpi (threads per inch) there are chucks and face plates and spur centers available all over for it

Make sure you use some Kroil, Knock 'er Loose or other good penetrating oil in the head and tail stocks to help loosen up the chuck so you can knock it out, it is held in with a #2 Morse Taper, but they can get rusted in there pretty tight, but the only way to get them out is pressure, they aren't threaded in the fixtures, and be fragile not to hit the step pulley when knocking the chuck out, Yeah I dinged mine

It's now a real heave duty lathe, but I have turned hundreds of bowls and spindles on the one I had, I gave it to a buddy of mine when I got a new lathe.

If you build a bench of stand for it make it so you can lay bads of sand on the bottom of the stand for ballast when turning things out of balance

Have fun with it
 

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Bsmith72
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Awesome thanks so much guys, every little bit helps. I'm going to start browsing eBay and look for a couple pieces I need to get this thing in working order. By chance, does anyone know what model or what similar model of lathes parts will fit this machine?

Again, thanks so much
 

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Awesome thanks so much guys, every little bit helps. I'm going to start browsing eBay and look for a couple pieces I need to get this thing in working order. By chance, does anyone know what model or what similar model of lathes parts will fit this machine?

Again, thanks so much
About the only things you need besides chisels is possibly a live end for the tail stock and a chuck or face plates and possibly a spur center for the head stock.They are all about the same,you will need a #2 Morse taper to secure the part in the spindles, and if you get a threaded chuck it will need to be a 1"x 8Threads per inch to screw on the spindle, all very common parts

The only thing that happened to mine was I was turning a cedar bowl and got way too aggressive (I was about 12-13 and knew everything) the gouge caught real hard and it broke the tool rest in the slot where you adjust it. Dad brazed it back for me and I used it for about 30 more years, and my buddy is still using it

I don't think there was actually a model number it was Delta's competitive tool series that was called Homecraft
 

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Soak it in Kroil. You should be able to get the dead center out of the tails stock just by turning the handle in reverse after the Kroil soak. The missing knob on the tailstock lock handle should be a standard catalog item for McMaster Carr or MSC They would have Vee belts also. The chuck has a small Morris taper and you can get it out with a good overnight soak in Kroil an the use of a smooth bar through the head stock. After it soaks overnight a good sharp hit on the bar through the head stock should loosen it. Polish the tapers with a split dowel, grey Scotch bright and some oil. If they are damaged you can restore them with a taper finishing reamer but they are expensive. Chucks, face plates, centers, tools are all common 3rd party parts. I doubt that any OEM parts are still available. Fabricate a belt guard yourself. If it needs bearings you can get them on-line or at your local industrial distributor (I use Motion Industries.)
 
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