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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was thinking of slotting with the router and 1/4" plywood spline, 1/2" deep in both pieces the length of the arm.

2013-08-08_15-45-58_733 smaller.jpg

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where's my table saw?
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how is this....

Biscuits may be fine too.

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where's my table saw?
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back to the regular programming

I'm thinking a routed groove that would allow the arm rest to slide over the side panel. How would you do that? I'm thinking a dado bit with a bearing that would follow the curvature. You'd have to hand chisel the intersection where the top meets the curve. Personally, I like to make the joint itself structural rather than relying on dowels, biscuits or other means. JMO.
 

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Bill,

I'm trying to imagine how that could be done.

In my mind you'd have to use a very tall aux router fence in order to complete the cut with the router bit vertical or a horizontal router setup using the table as support.

Either way the short leg of the assembly and a good portion of the curved component will have to be hand mortised because the glue up is a done deal.

Your thoughts?
 

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where's my table saw?
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hand held router

Bill,

I'm trying to imagine how that could be done.

In my mind you'd have to use a very tall aux router fence in order to complete the cut with the router bit vertical or a horizontal router setup using the table as support.

Either way the short leg of the assembly and a good portion of the curved component will have to be hand mortised because the glue up is a done deal.

Your thoughts?
I'd make a rest for the router base the same thickness as the arm.
I'd secure the arm with a curved backer that captured it on both ends. I'd also want to do this from both sides a little at a time. It requires flipping the fixture over for the other side. I called it a dado bit, but in any case it requires a bearing to establish the depth of cut and follow the profile. different size bearings can be used if the depth of cut is too great initially.

Sketchup is a great tool for the design, but unfortunately doesn't solve the "process" or joinery issues. :no:
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have a slot cutter on a 1/2" arbor shaft with a guide bearing. I thought about rabbbiting it but that makes some hand work at the ends.
Maybe we are talking the same thing.

Plain Shoe Benches arm detail.jpg
 

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That's an idea but it would require twice the setup, twice the cuts, twice the chiseling, and a greater degree of accuracy (smaller tolerances).

IMO you're better off with a dado.
 

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I have a slot cutter on a 1/2" arbor shaft with a guide bearing. I thought about rabbbiting it but that makes some hand work at the ends.
Maybe we are talking the same thing.

View attachment 76909
If the arm is wider than the panel, it could be a slot cutter, with a few passes. Then the arm fits on the panel. You could do it with a slot cutter and make a shaped spline like you sketched. It just seems chincy having the arm teetering on the panel with only a spline. It would likely work though.

Or, you could make the attachment look somewhat custom, by using contrasting dowels and drilling it right through the top of the arm into the panel, and sand flat. Maybe install them like every 3" or so.






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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The 1/4" spline is what was concerning me. Through dowels was my other thought. I thought of gluing it in place and when dry, adding the dowels.

The arm is flush with the panel on the seat side so that I can open the seat for storage with out complicating the box lid.
 

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cabinetman said:
...Or, you could make the attachment look somewhat custom, by using contrasting dowels and drilling it right through the top of the arm into the panel, and sand flat. Maybe install them like every 3" or so.
Great idea!
 

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The 1/4" spline is what was concerning me. Through dowels was my other thought. I thought of gluing it in place and when dry, adding the dowels.

The arm is flush with the panel on the seat side so that I can open the seat for storage with out complicating the box lid.

The more I think about the dowels, the more I like the idea. I would arrange the grain on the dowels the same.




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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Ah I think this is what you mean with the rabbit.
This would work easily as well. The dowels would probably be easier though. I could even use screws to attach it till the glue dries...then remove the screws and then install the dowels.:thumbsup:

Plain Shoe Benches detail 2.jpg

The problem with the rabbit at this point is it reduces the height of my panel
 
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