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I need a way to store my weight plates in my weight room, and thought up this configuration (see attached image). I have no idea if it would be strong enough, structurally sound, safe, etc...

It's basically 3 separate vertically wall mounted weight plate trees mounted to the wall studs (through the drywall) on a single 12' non load-bearing wall. I would mount one tree every other stud (16" spacing) starting with the second one from the corner. I staggered the heights of the 2x4s because I figured it would help distribute the load over a larger surface. But what do I know, I'm an IT manager, not an engineer.

Is this too much weight/force on the studs or the wall as a whole?

Any feedback, suggestions or criticism would be greatly appreciated, as I would hate to do something that would wreck my wall/house/marriage :laughing:
 

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where's my table saw?
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here's what I'd do

You can make your tree assemblies as 3 separate units, then attach them to the studs at the top, where the forces are wanting to pull them out. Use a lag screw, counterbored for looks on the longest, tallest, rearmost 2 x 4 and let the weight ...most of it rest, on the floor. Each unit can be screwed together to make one assembly and then the holes can be bored for the pipe after you have them assembled. A wood plug in the end of the pipe may prevent a scrape or injury while hanging the weight.
There is not that much weight in the description you gave, so no need for extreme overkill ....JMO.
 

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It might be easier if you made a "L" with your 2x4, in other words attach your pictured 2x4 that runs vertically, on top of the wide flat edge of another 2x4, flush to one edge, then you can run a lag bolt through the 1 1/2" width instead of burying one through the 3.5" depth of the 2x4 on edge.

The "L" shape is very strong, so long as you properly attach the two 2x4's you should have no issues, as was mentioned before you are trying to balance out the pullout force, most of the force is straight down. You may want to consider drilling in your pipe at a slight angle upward, that would lean some of the pressure backwards and may offset some of the plates towards the front. The length of the pipe is critical as it will shift the center of gravity forward.

Assuming 1/2" drywall, a 1/4" diameter lag bolt 3" long should embed about an inch into the stud wall member. Remember, you don't want to embed too deep in case the electrician or plumber routed something through the center of the stud ;) Predrill and wax the lag.

Something like this though begs for you to take up welding :laughing:
 
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