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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i have a delta 10" table saw and a jet 2hp dust collector. I already have a long ranger remote start but i would rather have a way that when i turn on my table saw, my dust system would turn on automatically. Like these vacuums with the auto-start feature (which i have 2 of and love them!)
thanks for any ideas, much appreciated

Bruno
 

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http://www.pennstateind.com/store/ecogate4.html

A little pricey and you have to buy the kit to get started. The kit will set up 4 machines. It operates on detecting the vibration that the machine produces and opens the blast gate and your vacuum.
 

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power switch

Bruno, I'm not sure if this is what you need or not, but I have one and
it works well the way I have it hooked up. It is a powered outlet that plugs directly into your wall socket,you then plug your saw and vac or dust collector into it, when you turn the saw on it activates a circuit in the power outlet to automatically turn on the vac or dust collector.

They have them at Sears for about $25.00 I think, not a bad solution
to that problem, hope this helps........eezlock
 

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Auto on

That is assuming that your equipment is 110v.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
the machines that i have are all 220 that i want to have the dust collector go on as well. The first request was expensive but if it is my only option i will opt to buy it

thanks and anymore suggestions are welcomed.
 

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If you want to do it cheap, get a 220v dry contact relay, put it inline to your tablesaw motor, and wire the contacts to your vacuum system. Not sure of your configuration, but you might want to wire the vac with either 3-way or 4-way switches, which could get a bit tricky.

Another way, which will make all electricians scream: one leg of 220v is 110, so you could do something with that. I am not saying this is a good way, but it can be done. If you do it this way,you will not be able to switch it from another location(s) via 3-way or 4-way switches. It would just simply supply power to the vac when the tablesaw motor is powered. Again, I don't even know if I would do it this way, but I might, depending on the circumstances. If you really don't know what I just said, then I would definately go with one of the kits available for this purpose.
 

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Another way this could be done, assuming you have no other equipment using the dust collector, would be to wire the dust collector to the switch on the table saw. It would work but you limit your flexibility in the shop with regard to using it with other equipment.

Ed
 

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Just a thought:

Your equipment is 220 volt, and your dust collector is 110 volt? Okay?
Take one leg from the 220 volt to your motor, as suggested, and set up a power bar or receptacle on your saw that is 110 volt. It would then be powered any time your saw is switched on. You could then plug your dust collector into the power bar, or receptacle, and when you want to use it on another piece of equipment just unplug and move.

It seems practical to me.

Hope I don't get shot down in flames for this suggestion.

Gerry
 

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Just a thought:

Your equipment is 220 volt, and your dust collector is 110 volt? Okay?
Take one leg from the 220 volt to your motor, as suggested, and set up a power bar or receptacle on your saw that is 110 volt. It would then be powered any time your saw is switched on. You could then plug your dust collector into the power bar, or receptacle, and when you want to use it on another piece of equipment just unplug and move.

It seems practical to me.

Hope I don't get shot down in flames for this suggestion.

Gerry
This will put an unbalanced load on the starter relay and it will probably shut down. It is set up for the rated HP of your TS and when you add another motor on it it will likely trip.
 

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This will put an unbalanced load on the starter relay and it will probably shut down. It is set up for the rated HP of your TS and when you add another motor on it it will likely trip.
This is a good point. What I would do is tie into the line between the switch and the motor starter/overload relay to prevent this problem. You probably have a double pole single throw (DPST) switch on your saw, so you would only use one side of this to feed the vacuum. Then of course, you would have to use a neutral and ground from another source since the table saw probably only has ground and not neutral.

Another thing I hadn't considered is that your vacuum may have a motor that can be jumpered for either 110 or 220. If you look at the motor for any labels you might notice ratings for either voltage, along with coresponding amps. If this is the case, you could wire your vacuum for 220 and do this a little easier (possibly).

Not to get too long winded here, but another option you may consider is to move the vacuum to another location where you won't hear it. This way it won't be such an annoyance when it's running.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
i already have a long ranger 3, but it is too much of a pain to turn it on for 10-15 seconds for a quick cut, then to turn it off, also it is not efficient power or time wise.
 

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Avoid using half of the 2 pole switch on the saw to power up the vacuum. The combined starting current of both the saw and the vacuum would likely cause switch failure.
 

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Hi Bruno

Who makes the automatic start vacuums, and what triggers them into operation? Perhaps there is something there that could be copied. I agree with Daryl, in that you will want to run the dust collector for a while after you shut off your equipment, to clear the pipes. Would it be practical to incorporate a relay, connected to your saw start switch, or is the distance to the dust collector significant?

Gerry

Ps: I have an interest in the answers to this question because I am assembling a dust collection system now.

Gerry
 

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I wouldn't do it

Unless your work patterns are different from mine or your dust collector is more friendly to turning on and off all the time, I wouldn't bother with a system that turns your collector on and off automatically.

The startup power for a larger dust collection system is much greater than the running power. There are often times that I want to turn off the saw, but don't really want to pay for the startup time and cost for powering on the dust collector again. Likewise, there are times I want to cross-cut something very small and don't want the dust collector at all.

If you are using a very small collector or a shop vac, it might be Ok, but I really don't want my 2hp cyclone turning on and off each time I power up a tool.

Best,

Scott
 

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Okay, so what you are basically saying is, that unless the time off is significant, you are better off leaving the equipment running. Just out of curiosity, do you have any idea what kind of time off would be balanced by start up.

I have to confess I am a turn it off freak, but I hear what you're saying.

Gerry
 

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Good idea

I like the idea of a second remote next to the table saw. I'm on my third remove now so having a backup is a great idea. One remote I lost in the yard somewhere and the other was stolen with my apron and a set of drill bits (only a really dumb or hurried thief steals an apron and some bits from a shop full of tools).

As far as the amount of time between cuts for turning on and off the dust collector, it's a matter of preference, I guess. I tend to turn off anything with a cutter as soon as soon as the workpiece is clear unless I have another piece ready. I frequently find I need to adjust a fence or do something that requires the cutter or blade to be stopped, but I'm planning on starting it again in within a minute or so. I leave the dust collector going during this time.

Another example is moving from the table saw to the jointer to clean up an edge that's a little burned. I'll turn off the table saw, walk to the jointer and turn it on without ever turning off the dust collector.

I you consider only electrical cost, I would guess (highlight guess) that the cost of leaving the collector running for a minute or so is less than the startup cost for the machine. These machines suck up a lot of juice when they fire up.
 
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