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Discussion Starter #41
I thought you were only glazing the Poplar.
I am glazing the poplar and if it takes well, i will glaze the bartop as well. I dont have any scraps of the arm railing at my house - the bar is at my father in-laws house and I was practicing last night with the ratio and application.

The photos are the result of this experiment.
 

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Discussion Starter #42
You lost me when you said you were mixing the stain with the glaze. Powdered, glaze, you say? I'm afraid that is out of my league.

The glaze I used, and the same used in the video is thicker than stain, almost the texture of sour cream...maybe a little thinner. You simply apply it with a brush over your work, and then wipe it off just like the guy did in the video.
Indeed the glaze is a liquid in a milky liquid a little thinner than sour cream consistency. No one im my area has an tinted glaze, so i need to mix my own.

A red mahogany was suggested in an earlier post and I do like the color. I bought Old Masters to mix with the glazing. I did a 4:1 mix but i think its way too thin.
 

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I am getting a clearer picture now. Thanks for clearing that up for me.

The Van Dyke glaze must be a popular glaze. I went to the Woodcraft store to get another can. There were only two. I bought one and a lady walked in and bought the other one. The clerk said it goes pretty quickly. Apparently the name "Van Dyke" is the color because the General Finishes brand I bought looks identical to the Sherwin Williams stuff used in the video.
 

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Discussion Starter #44
I am getting a clearer picture now. Thanks for clearing that up for me.

The Van Dyke glaze must be a popular glaze. I went to the Woodcraft store to get another can. There were only two. I bought one and a lady walked in and bought the other one. The clerk said it goes pretty quickly. Apparently the name "Van Dyke" is the color because the General Finishes brand I bought looks identical to the Sherwin Williams stuff used in the video.
Sorry for the confusion, i think my entire post has been a huge confusion.

I'm thinking that re-mixing the glaze/stain ratio is needed. The way I have it now had incredible working time and no brush marks, it was great, just no penetration! But that is probably the result of the Danish Oil.

I wish I could find the Van Dyke Glaze in the bay area, ordering it is atleast a week delivery time.
 

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Discussion Starter #45 (Edited)
In everyone's honest opinion...

Should i just sand down the bar rail again and attempt to re-stain, rather than pursue the glaze?

Applying the pre-conditioner to the railing didnt seems to really even out the color much, in fact, it looks as if it prevented color from being absorbed is a few parts.

I could leave the danish top and use the red mahogany on the rail, giving me a two tone bar effect.

please dont say "hire a pro" haha
 

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In everyone's honest opinion...

Should i just sand down the bar rail again and attempt to re-stain, rather than pursue the glaze?

Applying the pre-conditioner to the railing didnt seems to really even out the color much, in fact, it looks as if it prevented color from being absorbed is a few parts.

I could leave the danish top and use the red mahogany on the rail, giving me a two tone bar effect.

please dont say "hire a pro" haha

You're the only one that can make that call. You're the one that must be happy with the project.
There were several things going on here on this project. As they say hind-sight is always 20/20. This is learning the hard way and most of us have been there and understand your frustration.
The oak and the poplar woods are so different from each other that that alone caused a major hurdle for a color match from the start.
Sample pieces of each wood should have been prepared and color matched before the color was put to the bar.
When the oil stain wasn't satisfactory, you moved to the Danish Oil.
The Danish is a great product, but it's stain and finish in one. It seals the wood and makes further staining less penetrating.
My thoughts are this: if your pleased with the look of the oak, that's good.
If you can get the color on the rail where your pleased, that will be good.
If the two don't match, but they both look okay, that can still be good.
Many projects are made with two or more woods and although it may be a very nice project, you can still identify the woods and tell they don't match. This is not always a bad thing. You just need to be OKAY with the end result. There has been so much learned from this experience and you now know more about staining, color matching and finishes overall than before and that a very good thing.
Maybe you can post a picture of the completion when done.
 

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Toolman has given some good advice. Not much I can add.

I will say this...it sounds to me like you are in a hurry to get this job completed. That very well could be your downfall. Is there any reason you can't order some glaze of the type or style you like and then just apply it? No mixing.

General Finishes Java gel stain is a really dark stain. It might help to hide some of the look you don't like in the bar rail. Check out YouTube for Java Gel Stain. There are several videos demonstrating how folks updated their kitchen cabinets.

Now for the bottom line. When your project is complete, folks that see it are going to be amazed. Mainly because they won't know what is good and what isn't. A smooth finish over your glaze will make all the difference in the world.

The cabinets I have built have had a few miscues here and there, and that is to be expected. But they aren't evident and no one ever notices.

Here are a few pics of a wet bar I built for our friends. They absolutely love it. Hard maple with Java gel stain simply painted on (two coats) to give a really dark color. Then a clear finish was applied (sprayed). Note the dry bar in front was purchased used from someone else. Then they had matching granite counter tops made.

We will be there this weekend for their 4th of July party. :thumbsup:

Good luck. I wish you the best.
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #48
You're the only one that can make that call. You're the one that must be happy with the project.
There were several things going on here on this project. As they say hind-sight is always 20/20. This is learning the hard way and most of us have been there and understand your frustration.
The oak and the poplar woods are so different from each other that that alone caused a major hurdle for a color match from the start.
Sample pieces of each wood should have been prepared and color matched before the color was put to the bar.
When the oil stain wasn't satisfactory, you moved to the Danish Oil.
The Danish is a great product, but it's stain and finish in one. It seals the wood and makes further staining less penetrating.
My thoughts are this: if your pleased with the look of the oak, that's good.
If you can get the color on the rail where your pleased, that will be good.
If the two don't match, but they both look okay, that can still be good.
Many projects are made with two or more woods and although it may be a very nice project, you can still identify the woods and tell they don't match. This is not always a bad thing. You just need to be OKAY with the end result. There has been so much learned from this experience and you now know more about staining, color matching and finishes overall than before and that a very good thing.
Maybe you can post a picture of the completion when done.
Thank you very much for your encouragement and words of wisdom. I need to do some deep thinking about what I want. Bottom line is i do not like the poplar rail look at all and sanding past the Danish may be my only solution to a satisfactory finish without painting the rail black.

I appreciate it! I will definitely post a picture.
 

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Discussion Starter #49
Toolman has given some good advice. Not much I can add.

I will say this...it sounds to me like you are in a hurry to get this job completed. That very well could be your downfall. Is there any reason you can't order some glaze of the type or style you like and then just apply it? No mixing.

General Finishes Java gel stain is a really dark stain. It might help to hide some of the look you don't like in the bar rail. Check out YouTube for Java Gel Stain. There are several videos demonstrating how folks updated their kitchen cabinets.

Now for the bottom line. When your project is complete, folks that see it are going to be amazed. Mainly because they won't know what is good and what isn't. A smooth finish over your glaze will make all the difference in the world.

The cabinets I have built have had a few miscues here and there, and that is to be expected. But they aren't evident and no one ever notices.

Here are a few pics of a wet bar I built for our friends. They absolutely love it. Hard maple with Java gel stain simply painted on (two coats) to give a really dark color. Then a clear finish was applied (sprayed). Note the dry bar in front was purchased used from someone else. Then they had matching granite counter tops made.

We will be there this weekend for their 4th of July party. :thumbsup:

Good luck. I wish you the best.
Mike
I am in sort of a hurry now. We are having a party July 18 and I still need to give myself time to apply the varnish and have some curing time. Most products ive looked at will take at least a week or so, and maybe delayed because of the holiday.

Those cabinets look amazing! Thanks for all the help and support.

-Rick
 

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Discussion Starter #50
Well guys ...

I did it! Finally! I ended up doing it the right way and sanded down to bare wood, the poplar arm rail. I did not re-condition (took a chance on this) and used the red mahogany as my stain. I think a higher quality of stain like old masters really helped in the application and working time.

As i applied the stain, I had my father in law wipe off about 3ft behind me. This worked out flawless, no lap marks, no streaks.

We then added the stain to the top of the bar over the danish oil and it gave the danish a nice red tint to it. I'm letting it cure until sunday where I will start the varnishing process.

Here are some images! Thank you everyone for your help!

Sanded railing (2hrs working time)



Stained Railing


Stained Bartops




How can I fix this blemish?I think someone put their finger on the railing.I still have some glazeleft also that i could apply, im just not sure how to tackle this
 

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Chuco,
Picture #3 is the money shot! Looking good.
Very glad you hung in there to get something your pleased with
Happy 4th to you and yours!
 

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Nice work. Things are really starting to improve.

This is why I've pretty much stopped using stain on most refinishing projects. I only use the stuff on wood that has never had a previous finish on it, and even then I will more often than not stick to using SolarLux NGR Dye since it always gives an even tone even on wood like Maple which is notorious for coming out blotchy when stain is used.
I do a lot of firearm refinishing and when mistakes can result in ruining a few thousand dollar shotgun, it's important to stick with tried and true methods. After stripping the wood, I scrub it with hot water and TSP, followed by a wash of vinegar to neutralize the TSP (if you don't, finishes can fail). I then sand to 600 then apply a mixture of Rottenstone and Daly's BenMatte Tung Oil Finish, wiping it across the grain to force it into the pores. After it sits for a few minutes, I come back and wipe across the grain to remove 90% of what's on the surface. That 10% is important to leave. Let dry overnight. I then lightly wet sand with mineral spirits and 1000grit with a soft block, being careful not to cut through the perfectly filled grain. Next I apply SolarLux American Walnut and blend as needed if there is any sapwood since it takes the dye completely different than heartwood. After that drys, I finish with either BenMatte (my favorite), or if the customer wants I'll go old-school and apply a hand rubbed oil finish, or a modern durable finish like a Pre-Cat Urethane (yuck... plastic).

Here's my 1912 A.H. Fox 16ga I refinished and re-cut the checkering last year.


And my Browning Auto-5 16ga which also was refinished and fresh cut checkering.


They are both my go-to shotguns for upland game and ducks.
 
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