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I am in the process of making a dining table and need help with a problem. The wood that I am using is Koa, a hardwood from the acacia family. I am working on the table top section first and didn't attach it yet to any legs or skirts. After reading a lot on the net I thought that I was doing all the necessary things for it to come out right. The size of my table is 42"w x 68" long. The planks are 6” wide x 1” thick. The wood was kiln dried (as I was told to 6%) after it was air dried for over two years. I had all the pieces jointed and trued. When I glued them up I used biscuits with Titebond 3 glue and made sure the rings were not facing the same way. After it was all glued together, I had it sanded in a 43” wide belt sander both top and bottom for consistency. I then used the palm sander with 80, 150, and 220 grit paper. I will be using a oil finish on all sides to seal it totally. Now the problem. Everything was fine and flat until the other day when I noticed it was starting to bow up from the outer edges. I have it sitting on a table on my patio which is covered on top but open on the three sides, because I haven’t had the time yet to finish it. It has been there just a few days. I live in Hawaii where the humidity is quite high. The temperature here varies from the 60’s to 80’s. The top may get a little sun like for a couple hrs in the morning. Please advise me what to do before I start finishing it to get it back to flat again. Do I need to keep it in the house until it is finished? I know that I will need to slot the skirts and use special fasteners when I install the top to allow for movement, but I didn’t even get to that part yet. Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

Thank You,
Rob
Hilo, Hawaii
 

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Send the Koa to me. I'll make a few guitars from it and...just kiddin'.:laughing:
Is it a smooth cup or is it a potatoe chip???
 

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I second that. Clamping it close to flat as it gets used to the new climate couldn't hurt either. Once it's stable the table skirts should hold it down. Hey, it's wood, it moves.



I still think you sould send it to me though!!!!:laughing:
 

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hmmm

as above

reason it bowed - dried out on the exposed surface (top) due to direct sunlight and ambient air temperatures
the undersurface wasn't exposed so didn't dry out as quick
next time
apply a finish to protect your job as soon as you can after the job is finished
oh - and
make sure you apply the same finish to the underside of the table-top as you apply to the top (don't need to do such an expert job on the underside as you won't see it - but it will prevent moisture and heat from penetrating the bare timber underneath and causing warping or cupping...
good luck
Jedo
 

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That happened to me and I clamped it flat with 2X4's and it went back to flat. If it will go back that easily, the clamps you use to connect the top to the frame will probably be enough to keep it flat after the sealer coat is on all over.

What I would like to know, is what are the options to make 4" tapered (on two sides) table legs? Also, if the table legs are 100 inches apart along the length of the table, can I double up on the apron, using two 3 " wide , 1" thick, boards to span the distance, or do I have to go to a tressel table design instead of four corner legs?

Rich
 

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Even after you bring it in keep it out of direct sunlight. Consider using using a floating breadboard design or dovetailed battens beneath it.
How do you make the dovetail battens and where do they go? I think I know what you mean but I am not sure.

Rich
 
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