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Now this is just my opinion, but I have and love the Wolverine jig with the original Varigrind and the Woodcraft 8" grinder. I have upgraded the wheels to Norton wheels from Craft Supply USA and use the Oneway wheel balancer on them. I use Raptor set up tools to ensure consistent angle every time.
 

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Another opinion is to use a Worksharp 3000 and the toolbar accessory and the Tormek jigs.

I happen to prefer flat rather than hollow ground faces.

No issues with handle length.

I purchased the Wolverine jig, but have not used it.

I expect you will get a number of different opinions, no right or wrong, just different preferences.
 

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I have that grinder with the Wolverine and it's the cat's meow for lathe chisels. The Norton wheels are a nice upgrade, they last quite a bit longer.
 

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I've played with (and currently doing a real time evaluation) of a lot of sharpening systems. I've been using the Slow speed grinder from Woodcraft and some 100 grit white wheels with the Oneway sharpening system and the Varigrind bowl gouge jig. All the other jig systems seem to be modifications of this. Been using this system for about 10 years now and it's great. Look up some of my videos on sharpening on youtube. Here's one.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xbggxj2kgyc
I am currently testing a new CBN wheel on my grinder and it's really really sweet. It cost almost twice as much as the grinder but doesn't wear down, runs perfectly true, is 180 grit but seems to remove metal as fast as 100 grit.
I'm also testing a strip sander with various grits of belts and the Tormek Grinder. This is going to take a while so look for the results around the end of March.
I have tried flat grinds, concave and convex grinds. I find very little difference in them. It's much more important how you sharpen and how you use the tool than the shape of the grind.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Another opinion is to use a Worksharp 3000 and the toolbar accessory and the Tormek jigs.

I happen to prefer flat rather than hollow ground faces.

No issues with handle length.

I purchased the Wolverine jig, but have not used it.

I expect you will get a number of different opinions, no right or wrong, just different preferences.
I like the idea of a flat grinder but this grinder looks like a lot of plastic. Does anyone have one of these that can weight in on how this holds over the years??
 

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I like the idea of a flat grinder but this grinder looks like a lot of plastic. Does anyone have one of these that can weight in on how this holds over the years??
The sanding discs I use are PSA on 1/2in thick glass.

It is a slow speed motor. Not sure, but I think it is geared to the disc. I have not taken apart to see.

Some folks also use the belt sander portion of a disc/belt sander tilted at appropriate angle and then various jigs to set the tool at the desired angle.

Sorby sell a 1in belt sander specifically for lathe tools. Nice but expensive.
http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Mer...&Store_Code=packard&Category_Code=sharp-proed
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Dave that's an interesting idea with the belt sander. I have a older Dayton 8" disk 1"X42" belt sander that I'm not currently using. I could mount a Surgi-SharpUniversal Angle Guide and make it into a dedicated sharpener. Has anyone ever used one of these Surgi-sharp guides?


 

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The Surgi sharp isn't much different than the standard platform that comes with the Lee Valley strip sander. I have converted a Lee Valley to work with turning tools so I can learn more about belt sharpening, particularly at higher grits. I'll take some photos tomorrow. the biggest problem with sandpaper type sharpeners is the paper wears out. Not terribly fast but you do have to replace it. The strip sander belts can be replaced in 30 seconds. Much easier than the glue on types. I did order 2 belts with a grit designed for metal so I can compare them to ordinary wood cutting belts.
http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=44884&cat=1,43072
 

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I'm not sure you can get up with a better solution than what Sawdust mentioned. Its what I use and I love it. The Wolverine jig takes the learning curve away. The Vari-Gring jig is awesome for gring those tools with wings. I even used it to grind the profiles on my Easy Rus Tools!!

Heres my setup...

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f6/lathe-tool-sharpening-system-38234/
 

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Now this is just my opinion, but I have and love the Wolverine jig with the original Varigrind and the Woodcraft 8" grinder. I have upgraded the wheels to Norton wheels from Craft Supply USA and use the Oneway wheel balancer on them. I use Raptor set up tools to ensure consistent angle every time.
Sawdust, with the raptor hogs, what is the distance the v should be from the wheel center??

Here is a sketch, x is the distance I'm looking for, or does that not matter at all?

ForumRunner_20130218_123940.jpg
 

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Dema, the tail rests in the v of your adjustable arm and the 2 points make contact with your wheel. Assuming same amount of tool protruding (i use a jig to set this) every time, then you will always get the same consistent grind. If this doesn't make sense, pm me and I'll get you some pics.
 

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Dema, the tail rests in the v of your adjustable arm and the 2 points make contact with your wheel. Assuming same amount of tool protruding (i use a jig to set this) every time, then you will always get the same consistent grind. If this doesn't make sense, pm me and I'll get you some pics.
I got that, but does the V need to be a certain distance from the center of the wheel? I built my own setup, but if I use the raptor jigs the v distance doesn't matter? I might not be explaining this right Lol

Or does the raptor jig set the v distance every time?? Sorry for my ignorance
 

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The distance of the V arm is set according to the angle you want the front bevel or your bowl gouge. Usually between 45 and 70 degrees. 55 is a good starting point for most bowl gouges. Once you have established this angle put the nose on the stone and set the V arm so the Wolverine jig rides in the back of it.
Once this is established then you can build a homemade version of the Raptor to set your V arm the same distance from the stone every time even if the stone wears down. See these videos for more info.



 

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The worksharp is a very durable machine...just sold mine because I did not use it very much. bought it to sharpen lathe tools but ended up getting a wolverine system which works very nice for every kind of tool.
 
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