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I have some old saw sharpening tools I will never use. Got them from my dad, but by the looks of them he probably got them from someone else. I have the following:

Taintors Positive No. 27 tooth setter with an anvil marked 1-10

Morbills tooth setter possibly a model 7B

Cincinnati Tool Co. Hargrave saw vice

A no name, old, Made In USA gizmo to hold a file for gumming (?) the teeth.

All appear to work, springs are intact.

In return, I need 3 backsaws sharpened.

Since I have no idea as to the value of these tools I don't know if this is a reasonable proposition or not.

If interested, you can contact me a [email protected] or P.M. me and I will send pictures.

Don
 

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You may get interest from someone, but my take is that you should learn to use them.

Your backsaws will need regular sharpening to stay in best condition, and most places will machine sharpen them. I have one saw that was machine sharpened, and it doesn't cut well at all; sooner or later I'll probably reduce the set and re-sharpen, just to make it usable again.

With those tools and a couple of files, you should be able to sharpen all three saws in a couple of hours, tops, unless they're really badly mangled. I've sharpened pretty badly dulled saws (teeth should NOT be rounded!), and it only takes about 20 minutes. I set the teeth on a panel saw (about 11 PPI, roughly 24" of "edge") in about 20 minutes, which was the first saw I'd ever set. It's not hard, and if you're going to use non-disposable handsaws, it's a useful skill to have.
 

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You may get interest from someone, but my take is that you should learn to use them. Your backsaws will need regular sharpening to stay in best condition, and most places will machine sharpen them. I have one saw that was machine sharpened, and it doesn't cut well at all; sooner or later I'll probably reduce the set and re-sharpen, just to make it usable again. With those tools and a couple of files, you should be able to sharpen all three saws in a couple of hours, tops, unless they're really badly mangled. I've sharpened pretty badly dulled saws (teeth should NOT be rounded!), and it only takes about 20 minutes. I set the teeth on a panel saw (about 11 PPI, roughly 24" of "edge") in about 20 minutes, which was the first saw I'd ever set. It's not hard, and if you're going to use non-disposable handsaws, it's a useful skill to have.
I agree with your assessment. I took a one day class for sharpening saws at the local WoosCraft store, and found that to be a great start in developing the skill I needed to keep my saws in tune.
 

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Oh, one more point: there are a lot of jigs for making sure every tooth is filed exactly the same way at exactly the same angle. There are also a lot of people, citing historical documentation, who suggest different angles as being "ideal".

My recommendation: most saws already have an angle filed into them. If they don't, they're not "saws" so much as "saw plate blanks." Go with what's there, and don't stress. If there are a few teeth that are a little off your chosen angle, don't worry about it: it'll even out over time. If there are a few teeth that are shorter than they should be (or even missing entirely), don't stress about it: they'll even out over time.

I think a lot of us -- myself included -- sometimes get caught up in the drive for perfection, and it really does get in the way. Pick a saw. Clamp it in the vise. Use a file to touch up the teeth, maybe 3 strokes on each tooth. Give it a try. Does it cut reasonably straight? Does it not bind? Good enough: it'll only get better as you sharpen it more. If it doesn't cut straight, you'll want to stone one side: it's easy. If it binds, you'll need to use the saw set: we can give you more detailed instructions for that, but basically try to put as little set as you can on it.

Basically, the short version is, don't make this harder than it needs to be. These are tools you could be using for the rest of your life; you shouldn't be spending much time at all maintaining them, and you shouldn't have to do without them for a week while someone else sharpens them for you.
 

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If you got them from your Dad, hang on to them, if you don't you will regret it later. They will never be replaced.

I need a saw set up myself, but will pass and buy on-line.

Listen to what the other have said, learn to use them, and you will be proud to use them.;)
 
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