Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
428322
428323


Hello everyone! I noticed there are some talented people here, so thought I would reach out for advice. I bought this table about three years ago. It seems as if one of the planks has started to rise (not sure the word for this to even google it). Any advice on how to fix this? I have absolutely no woodworking skills, so really appreciate any and all advice, thank you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
View attachment 428322 View attachment 428323

Hello everyone! I noticed there are some talented people here, so thought I would reach out for advice. I bought this table about three years ago. It seems as if one of the planks has started to rise (not sure the word for this to even google it). Any advice on how to fix this? I have absolutely no woodworking skills, so really appreciate any and all advice, thank you!
It seems as though one of your glue lines is failing, due to wood movement. I personally have not seen this; usually I see the wood crack around the glue line. If I wanted to fix the table, I’d rip it right down the glue line on the table saw and reglue it. Or an quicker less technical way would to put a iron bar across the bottom of the table and screw the bow out. Or you could hand plane it flat then have to sand and refinish the whole thing.. okay I think I’m gonna stop.
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
28,998 Posts
"Hello everyone! I noticed there are some talented people here, so thought I would reach out for advice. I bought this table about three years ago. It seems as if one of the planks has started to rise (not sure the word for this to even google it). Any advice on how to fix this? I have absolutely no woodworking skills, so really appreciate any and all advice, thank you!"

Lacking any woodworking skills, the advice we would give you would not help with this issue. It was made by a skilled or semi-skilled woodworker or carpenter with machines like a tablesaw, jointer or planer OR it was done by hand. (not likely) Clean, straight and square edges were joined together with glue and forcefully clamped together to form the top, none of which you have. (I am assuming)
Your choices are:
Have it repaired professionally by a skilled woodworker in a well equipped cabinet shop.
Return it to the seller or have them look at it assuming it will be covered by a warranty? (maybe unlikely)
Leave it as is, use a matching stain marker to conceal the gap and blend the color.
 

·
Generic Weeb
Joined
·
1,039 Posts
It's "Rustic" anyhow, so matching the stain isn't the worst idea out there, certainly the cheapest option too. If you have limited tools and experience this could either turn into a massive headache or a valuable experience. Depends on how much effort you want to put in it. I'd personally rip it out an re-glue it.

-T
 
  • Like
Reactions: Michaela

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It seems as though one of your glue lines is failing, due to wood movement. I personally have not seen this; usually I see the wood crack around the glue line. If I wanted to fix the table, I’d rip it right down the glue line on the table saw and reglue it. Or an quicker less technical way would to put a iron bar across the bottom of the table and screw the bow out. Or you could hand plane it flat then have to sand and refinish the whole thing.. okay I think I’m gonna stop.
Thank you! Love all the ideas, but would certainly need to hire a professional :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
"Hello everyone! I noticed there are some talented people here, so thought I would reach out for advice. I bought this table about three years ago. It seems as if one of the planks has started to rise (not sure the word for this to even google it). Any advice on how to fix this? I have absolutely no woodworking skills, so really appreciate any and all advice, thank you!"

Lacking any woodworking skills, the advice we would give you would not help with this issue. It was made by a skilled or semi-skilled woodworker or carpenter with machines like a tablesaw, jointer or planer OR it was done by hand. (not likely) Clean, straight and square edges were joined together with glue and forcefully clamped together to form the top, none of which you have. (I am assuming)
Your choices are:
Have it repaired professionally by a skilled woodworker in a well equipped cabinet shop.
Return it to the seller or have them look at it assuming it will be covered by a warranty? (maybe unlikely)
Leave it as is, use a matching stain marker to conceal the gap and blend the color.
Thank you so much! You are very correct that I have none of those tools. Unfortunately the warranty doesn’t cover this (not sure what it would cover then!). I do have a stain that matches that I’ve used on the chairs, so that was what I was thinking too. The only thing problem with that is that it’s sticking up pretty high, and so I’m afraid it could give someone a splinter as it’s pretty rough. I could live with it otherwise, but I feel like it’s going to cut someone eventually or maybe get worse if I don’t try to fix it as soon as I noticed. And it’s at too weird of an angle to hand sand the rough splintering edge. Not sure how it even happened! I will probably look into getting a professional to see if they can make it safe, that’s a good idea. Thank you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It's "Rustic" anyhow, so matching the stain isn't the worst idea out there, certainly the cheapest option too. If you have limited tools and experience this could either turn into a massive headache or a valuable experience. Depends on how much effort you want to put in it. I'd personally rip it out an re-glue it.

-T
Thanks! I agree that it’s not the worst thing in the world to happen given the look of the table, but was hoping for some way to make it flatter as it’s pretty jagged and worried it’s going to give someone a splinter.
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
28,998 Posts
I have some experience with this issue. The largest was a door that measured 32" X 72". It is no different than a table top of the same size. After the glue up there were slight variations in the planks causing raised edges which were not acceptable for a door. Here's the build thread and it includes the methods I used to level and flatten it:

428333
 

·
mike44
retired carpenter and farmer
Joined
·
295 Posts
I am trying to figure out how the bottom looks flat and the top seam is raised. Was this the way you bought it?
Can you tell if the boards are a single glued up piece or possibly a lamination? It may be that the top got wet and one board has raise from the soaking. The fix is easy, have a woodworker ,cabinet shop etc knock down the raised portion with a smoothing plane , stop before planing adjacent board. Finish with a card scraper. The top will need to be refinished.
A card scraper can probably remove the satin on the entire top if needed.
mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
222 Posts
As per the underside view, it appears the planks were *laid/attached (glue?) onto a ply substrate and one plank has dislodged, bowing upward. The simplest fix would be to clamp the bowed board back down and screw it securely to the substrate .... screwing it at several points from the substrate side, not from the top side. Clamping probably would require cauls to span the width. Rather than a pro, a fairly competent neighbor, friend, relative woodworker should be able to do the repair readily. If none of these are available, a local cabinet guy/girl can do it.

If this is the fix you use, then for future reference, if the table top is ever refinished it would be good to let the refinisher know there are screws on the underside for that board.

*There may be a chance all the boards are attached to the substrate from the underside with screws or nails (.... not with just glue, if applicable?). That needs to be inspected to see what may be there, if anything.

Sonny
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top