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Don't ask me why I started watching this video on YouTube but I thought it was interesting and some of you may appreciate it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7NOb-EF2TeU . I don't understand a word they are saying but it was interesting to see how woodworkers in different countries work. A few things I though were cool is how they used small wood dowels instead of nails or screws for their drawers, have planes that work in a pulling not pushing motion, work on the floor when dovetailing ( my back hurt watching) and finished the project with an interesting brush that worked fast and clean. There are other videos by the poster that were equally interesting ( yes I watched more than one). I wonder if their tools are available in the US. I would like to give them a try! Let me know what you guys think, it may change the way you woodwork!
 

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I couldn't believe how air tight the drawers are. Push one in and another pops out. I would think this wouldn't allow for any expansion but I guess they know what they are doing.
 

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The brushes looked a lot like hake brushes you can find at art supply stores. Their main value is no metal in the construction and extremely fine textured bristles. The use I'm familiar with is coating paper with photosensitive chemicals for alternative photographic processes.
 

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Pretty amazing joinery skills. I find it interesting how different cultures use different tecniques to perform the same task. I'm not sure I would be comfortable cutting dovetails standing, bent over on the work piece, or using my lower leg as a holdfast. Very cool.

Mike Darr
 

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where's my table saw?
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thanks a lot, pal

Now I'm completely discouraged. I thought I was a"decent" woodworker, but now I'm back at the bottom of the heap. I watched countless videos like these, all in Japanese while I was there on business. I never understood a word, but I learned a lot.
I couldn't work in those positions all day long either. Maybe that's what is wrong with us over here, we just have taken the easy way out. Evertything they do is opposite the way we do it. They pull their saws and planes rather than push, they work on the floor, rather than on a bench. They do know how to forge some fine chisels.

I noticed he dipped the chisel in what looked like beeswax each time he made a cut. The finish looked a lot like a shellac to me. Very cool stuff! :thumbsup:
 

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Yep, humbling to say the least. I think the chisel he was using has been sharpened a few times, there wasn't much of it left! The chisels, the Dozuki and the Kana are tools that I use regularly but I'm am not pulling such nice thin ribbons with my Kana. I guess my sharpening skills need a tune up.

The dovetail seems to be an international standard of fine woodworking.

Bret
 

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It really hurt just watching that. No way you'd catch me using my stocking feet as a holder around sharp tools.

Otherwise, it was pretty interesting to watch.
 

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Thank you for posting the video, now I feel even more inadequate. If I tried to use my foot as a clamp I would be going around like Long John Silver.
 

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I'm nowhere near as skilled as these guys and never will be but I work that like pretty much any time I'm using hand tools. I bring stuff in the house and work on the floor with my kids when I'm using hand tools.
 

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Simple rectangular construction, but the precision and skills are amazing.

Wish I was still that flexible, to work comfortably on a wooden floor.:thumbsup:

Would love to know what wood species they are using.
 

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In response to an earlier thread: I would think this craftsmanship is a true example of "hand made".
I was just going to say that, on another thread we were discussing what's handcrafted...will I say pretty much, that was for sure handcrafted...:laughing:...ya I can't believe how tight those joints were where it builds up air pressure closing a drawer causes another to open...man...if I ever handed one these guys my work using a router and every thing I have, they would probably take one look and walk it out to the dumpster to throw it away...:laughing:....I think even old Norm Abram would be impressed with these guys.
 

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I'm not convinced the drawer opened due to air pressure. If it was just pressure, the center drawer should open as well but it doesn't. My mom bought a piece in Korea built similarly and there's a mechanism for pushing one drawer out when you push the other in. Something like that may be in play here as well, unless of course there's a baffle of some kind behind the center drawer that prevents it from opening because the air is ducted away from it.

I tried to see if anything was visible but couldn't tell from the assembled shots whether there was any mechanism behind the drawers.
 

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Wow Thanks so much for sharing that, I really did enjoy it. :thumbsup:

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I noticed he dipped the chisel in what looked like beeswax each time he made a cut. ..
I was wondering what was that stuff he was dipping his chisel into at about 1:02?
 
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