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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What a royal pain in the a$$ but I did it.

Work got a little light and I managed to pick up 6 smaller walnut slabs for $300 so I've been building small tables with them - experimenting with other design elements to offer people.

I saw this from a youtube video showing a Japanese makers table with this detail. So I tried it.

Any way, here it is. I'm going to trim the rails tomorrow and begin finishing. Not bad for 4 hours work.
 

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where's my table saw?
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really nice look!

:thumbsup: :blink:

How are the side panels made? The dovetails run wild at the top, but are they part of one side panel or a build up. Are they long grain, since that what it appears? How did you attach the long grain to the vertical end panels which would have end grain at the top where they meet? Photos of the underside?
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
:thumbsup: :blink:

How are the side panels made? The dovetails run wild at the top, but are they part of one side panel or a build up. Are they long grain, since that what it appears? How did you attach the long grain to the vertical end panels which would have end grain at the top where they meet? Photos of the underside?

the legs are 6/4 solid pieces which I basically mortised into the rails. The M&T's fit very snug and I used a lot of glue to make sure there was enough to hold when absorbed into the end grain sections.

It looks like the dovetails are wild, but they're not. They were specifically placed.

I blew through this very quickly, I have about 5 hours in it and I forgot to take pre-build photos.

I really wanted to do this for the past week or so. While I was considering how to do it, the main thing running through my mind was:

1. How do I run those dovetailed rails all the way through while keeping the space accurate? By cutting the dovetailed rails on my table saw to avoid router table set up,assembling the base first, then placing it on the top, measuring to where it would look balanced, scribing the lines of the dovetail keys, tape them off, use a straight edge as a fence and plunge router, assemble and then
2. How can I make this a very fast, efficient and strong build in case I get orders for these? Same as above.

So this is what I came up with.

Here's a photo of how the join looks from the bottom. Again, fast, efficient, strong. And it needs to have a cool factor. I think I accomplished that.
 

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I wood if I could.
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That's one beautiful bench right there. Congratulations on getting your dovetails to work well. I haven't tried sliding dovetails yet. But when I finally do I hope they work out half as well as yours. She's a real looker too. The bow tie was definitely a nice touch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
That's one beautiful bench right there. Congratulations on getting your dovetails to work well. I haven't tried sliding dovetails yet. But when I finally do I hope they work out half as well as yours. She's a real looker too. The bow tie was definitely a nice touch.
well there was a crack and everybody ordering from me wants bowties.

These dovetails needed a little shimming here and there but its endgrain protruding so good luck finding them ;)
 

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...

These dovetails needed a little shimming here and there but its endgrain protruding so good luck finding them ;)
Shhh... We'll just keep this between me and you. No one else will ever know. ;)
 

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no secret... i found that there had to be about 1/16" play on each slot to avoid jamming and damaging the keys.
Oh, OK. That makes sense. Good to know; I haven't thought of that.
 

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sliding dovetails allow for movement!

They are more than a cool method of jointing the side to the top. I just figured this out...DUH. :blink:

I was looking at the photo of the side/leg attachment and saw what I think is an elongated hole. OK, all you need is one hole to keep things together. You could use 2 holes, but the second hole would be buried under the leg, and you can't get to it.
My original question was how did you allow for movement in the top if the sides were long grain., and I think just by having the dovetails alone, it's enough. If so, it's a damn clever way to attach things which move at different rates. :thumbsup: Was that your intent, knowing it would solve that issue?

 
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