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I have this http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00916472000P?prdNo=1&blockNo=1&blockType=G1 compressor and just bought this http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00915519000P?prdNo=7&blockNo=7&blockType=G7 gun made by DeVilbiss for about 80 bucks. The gun has a minimum of 7 cfm and my compressor is rated at 6.3. My question is this, will I be able to use this gun with this compressor? I think having 33 gallons and only a .7 cfm difference I will still be able to operate this gun fairly effectively. I know I probably won't be able to paint a large area with it, but for most woodworking applications it should work. Right? Any feedback would be appreciated.

P.S. Hi, from Indiana.
 

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Manufacturers publish specifications for a reason or for possibly more than one reason. For one, so the user will know what is required to successfully use the product. There is a minimum CFM for their gun to perform as it is suppose to. Also compressors do not increase in CFM output with use, so depending on how accurately yours was originally spec'd and your use of it, you would be fortunate indeed to actually have 6.3 CFM available now. The same goes with the gun. Specmanship, truth in advertising, etc all come into play. So be advised you may end up being dissatisfied with the results if your compressor if it actually has 5.5 CFM available and the gun really needs 7.5 to do a proper job. There is that risk involved. Just practice on test pieces before doing it to an important project. Remember that the HV in HVLP stands for High Volume. The key to the HVLP technology is based on higher CFM than you could get by with otherwise.

That being said it is also possible that the manuf actually added some to their specs to give a greater margin of error. And you could be in fat city rather than caught up short. So you likely really won't know the answer til you try it. I think, based on my experience, this is less likely to be the case but....

Hope you get good results, someday I'm going to try HVLP. But spraying is IMO the best way to apply a finish.
 

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More than likely you will be fine. If you are doing smaller jobs that require you to use the gun in short bursts and then wait a short while your compressor will keep up. If you plan on spraying larger pcs that will require extended air requirements you may have to wait for the compressor to catch up.
 

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Really underground garage
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Pay attention to moisture and any other "funk" being put out by compressor.Further,if left unchecked it can ruin a hose rather quickly.You just have to be very "pro-active" IMO in compressor world.

I like the 33g size.You're right at the sm end of being able to spray.A little research and understanding the above will help out alot.One hillbilly tip........have the compressor WELL below the gun.IOWs if hose is runnin uphill from comp. all the way to gun,moisture is gonna have a hard time.Do that in reverse will see every bit of funk runnin out the tip into paint.Good luck,BW
 

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I have this http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00916472000P?prdNo=1&blockNo=1&blockType=G1 compressor and just bought this http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00915519000P?prdNo=7&blockNo=7&blockType=G7 gun made by DeVilbiss for about 80 bucks. The gun has a minimum of 7 cfm and my compressor is rated at 6.3. My question is this, will I be able to use this gun with this compressor? I think having 33 gallons and only a .7 cfm difference I will still be able to operate this gun fairly effectively. I know I probably won't be able to paint a large area with it, but for most woodworking applications it should work. Right? Any feedback would be appreciated.

P.S. Hi, from Indiana.
If spraying lacquer with a 2mm nozel and 30 lbs of air . I don't see whay the unit won't work. That is what i spray at and never a problum . Just watch the moister out side. Lacquer like's to blush with high moister. I use a sanding sealer. Sometime it blush's But with the top cote. That disapear's and everthing is fine.
 

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2mm is a bit big, usually I use a 1.7mm for lacquers. Above that I reserve for primers.
 

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You will be fine, you may have to wait for the compressor to catch up, now and then. If you have used up enough air from the tank and the pressure is lowered, it will effect the gun.
 

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iguana
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You should be fine - maybe reduce the sprayer output a little. One thing I have heard is that the compressor should not run constantly - only about 50% of the time. If it runs more, it's too small for the job. This came to mind when someone commented on letting the compressor catch up. Anybody have an opinion on this?
 
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