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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
When I first started turning, I accumulated a HSS roughing gouge, a spindle gouge, an EZ-Rougher and an EZ-Finisher. I don't enjoy sharpening and I'm reall not good at it, so I gravitated to the EZ Tools. They're easy to use, but as I've become more knowledgeable, I've realized that they're really scrapers and using them to shape leaves a lot of sanding. Unlike sharpening, I'm good at sanding, but I don't enjoy sanding any more than I enjoy sharpening. I've also discovered that even though carbide holds its edge longer, that edge isn't as sharp to begin with as a well sharpened HSS steel edge and that replacing carbide inserts isn't all that cheap. I recently discovered Hunter Tools. The Hunter tool insert seems to make more of a shearing cut than a scraping cut. Before I try one though, I thought I'd stir some controversy here.

What do you see as the Pros and Cons of Hunter versus EZ versus Sharpening? (possibly factoring in my poor sharpening skills)

PS, I'm only doing spindle work so far
 

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I have the Hunter Hercules which uses the Hunter #3 cutter.

The Hunter design cuts rather than scrapes, and does have a small bevel.

Like you, I find the carbide cutters are expensive, the carbide is not as sharp as a freshly honed HSS tool, carbide is brittle and can chip, carbide edge lasts longer than HSS, but not as long as we think.

My Hunter tool is useful to have in the drawer, but the more I turn, the more I like the HSS tools with full bevel support.

The bevel rubs the wood and provides a smoother finish than EZ or the Hunter.

I am also not yet proficient in hand sharpening so I purchased the relevant jigs. Most of the time we are honing the edge rather than removing a lot of metal, so this is fast for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
".......so I purchased the relevant jigs. Most of the time we are honing the edge rather than removing a lot of metal, so this is fast for me."

I have purchased all the relevant jigs also, and I'm still lousy at it!
 

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Buy a small "fine" diamond card and you can sharpen thise EZ carbide inserts, You sharpen the top flat portion. No skill required. You can get a whole lot of sharpenings out of one before it needs replaced.
 

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I have purchased all the relevant jigs also, and I'm still lousy at it!
There must be a misunderstanding if you're not able to get a good repeatable grind when using a Wolverine (or equivalent) jig.

What tools are you having trouble sharpening? (And what grind are you attempting to replicate?)

A simple roughing gouge, for example, has a single variable -- how far out do you extend the jig arm? Get this right once for the nose angle you want, and that distance ("heel of the tool to wheel surface") should work for a long time. (Until the tool or the wheel wears down significantly.)
 

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I made some videos showing how I use the Hunter tools and also several on how to sharpen along with correcting sharpening problems. Those should help you with both tools.
My Hunter tools will actually cut better than the HSS tools when used as bevel rubbing tools. This is because the edge sharpening angle is more acute. Something like about 30 degrees or even less. That's why I like them so much. It does take some practice to learn to use the bevel on the Hunter tools but well worth it in the long run.
I do have one EZ wood tools and one copy. They cut and are easy to use. They don't hold an edge nearly as long as I thought they might and not nearly as long as the Hunter carbide tools. They aren't bad tools but if you don't like sanding go for a good sharp HSS bevel rubbing tool like a bowl gouge. Used properly you can get a finish that does not require a lot of sanding. ON a good day I can start with 220 easily on my hand mirrors. I'm not as good on bowls because I don't turn as many but rarely have to resort to anything courser than 150 and that's usually only a spot or two where your forced to cut up hill against the grain. Even then if I take the time to clean up that area with the Hunter I can start finer.
What I do like about the EZwood tool is when you really have to sneak up on a shape, it's like using a skew on it's side and you can really fine tune a shape. However a freshly sharpened skew will cut cleaner than the EZ wood tool you just have to stop and sharpen it often.
If you go to www.youtube.com and type in john60lucas sharpening you will find my sharpening videoes. Type in Hunter tools after my name and you will find those videos.
 
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