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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I'm new to woodworking and am building my first real project, (I've built a few things like workbenches, saw horses, chicken coop ect...) I have two panels that are glued up and were mostly flat. We had a huge rain come thru and now they are warped pretty good. (they are to be the sides of a chest of drawers) To try and fix it I've clamped them flat to my work bench and plan to let then sit like that for a day or two till the humidity drops. Is this a good idea or are there better ways to flatten them out?

Thanks for all the help
Kevin
 

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IMO that will not work and could possibly make it worse. What kind of wood and what was the MC of the wood before you machined it? You may have used too much clamping force/ your clue line not at a 90. When did you notice the cup? Right after they came out of clamps or did you
Lay them flat on table for a day or two then notice it? Laying flat does not allow for equalibrium of the moisture. One side gets more than other, hence the cup.
 

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The warpage is due to the moisture content increasing on the crown side. It caused that side of the panel to swell more than the other. If you are going to clamp it flat it make take quite a while until it stabalizes but you need to put sticks under it so air can circulate completely around the wood. Another option is to wet the cup side with water to make it swell to equalize the pressure. It's like you took a dry kitchen sponge and wet one side of it. It would curl toward the dry side.
 

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I recently built a blanket chest when the humidity was high and it soaked up so much moisture the top cup almost 3/8 of an inch over an 18 inch span. I was already to build another one and even had it glued up and went back to check on the original top and it had flatten itself back out. Give it a few weeks and see what happens.
 

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i've had good luck placing them outside on the ground, cup side down/crown up. moist soil (after a rain) and hot sun are the best combination. the moisture from the earth absorbs into the dry cupped side, and the sun dries the moist crown side. check every 15 - 30 minutes. it will actually go the other way if conditions are right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the help

Well, I left them clamped flat for a while then I place small pieces of wood between them so the air would circulate and by the end of the day they were back to being flat. So now I'm ready to cut my rabbet with my router. I did a test cut and for some reason it wasn't deep enough. Hmmmm..... I guess that what happens when you buy a 1/2" bit when you needed a 3/4" bit. :thumbdown: Rookie mistake but I'll be ready when I need a 1/2" rabbet. I may be messing up a lot but I'm having fun and that's what counts.

Thanks again!!!
 

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I would hate to guess how many times I've messed up in 40 years.

If you have a straight cut bit you might just be able to use a staight edge against the base of the router to get the extra 1/4" with your rabbet.
 

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I may be messing up a lot but I'm having fun and that's what counts.
The main difference between an experienced and a novice woodworker is that the experienced one has learned how to anticipate problems, how to avoid them, and how to fix them when they happen anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Just to throw gas on the fire I find out that you can't buy a rabbet bit that cuts 3/4" with a 1/4" shank and of course my router only uses a 1/4" shank. I'll have to break down and buy a bigger router. Of course this whole problem comes from the fact that I didn't buy a good enough table saw. It will only use up to 1/2" dado set. Man I'm having H*** just trying to cut a simple rabbet.
 

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You don't have to have a rabbeting bit to run the rabbet. You could do it with a straight cut bit runing the base of the router against a straight edge.
 

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Why don't you just make 2 passes on your table saw with the 1/2" dado stack to get the 3/4" rabbet desired?
 
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