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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
I'm completely new to this forum and admittedly don't know much about woodworking, but I joined today in hopes that someone could help me with this awesome "salad" bowl I picked up this afternoon at a local thrift shop.
The bowl is 36" across, approximately 8" tall, and varies from about 3.5 to 4" in thickness. It weighs a ton! Well, more like a hundred pounds or so! The can shown in the picture is a standard 12 oz. soda can.
It has many imperfections and looks like some sort of burled wood. It is definitely wood of some sort, but beyond that, I am completely baffled!
If anyone out there can help me with the type of wood, use, age, or anything else related, I would be very grateful.
Thanks so much!
 

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it is definitely a burl to be sure... as to the type of burl I really couldnt say but if I had to venture a guess Id say maybe cherry with an oil finish of some kind? it was carved and im guessing it was done with power tools as opposed to gouge. But you can be sure it took someone a good chunk of time working on this if nothing else because there was an extreme amount of material being removed. Burls of that size are rare around here. Where are you from? It'll make the wood identification easier. Either way... Good find!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
it is definitely a burl to be sure... as to the type of burl I really couldnt say but if I had to venture a guess Id say maybe cherry with an oil finish of some kind? it was carved and im guessing it was done with power tools as opposed to gouge. But you can be sure it took someone a good chunk of time working on this if nothing else because there was an extreme amount of material being removed. Burls of that size are rare around here. Where are you from? It'll make the wood identification easier. Either way... Good find!
THANKS SO MUCH bond3737! I live in Central Virginia and the shop location is Charlottesville, Virginia. I guess the piece could have come from around here rather than being imported from another region, but I've roamed the woods of Central Va. for about 60 years and never seen anything like this!
The grain and color looks like walnut to me, but someone at the shop where I work says he thinks it's cypress. If so, how it got here is anybody's guess.
In any event, THANKS AGAIN SO MUCH FOR ALL YOUR HELP!
 

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no problem! if you dont mind my asking, how much did it go for at the thrift shop? Wish that was something I came across just hanging out at goodwill! haha. great find... would love to throw some stone inlay in all those bark inclusions and re sand it down to a smooooth 600 grit:)very cool
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
no problem! if you dont mind my asking, how much did it go for at the thrift shop? Wish that was something I came across just hanging out at goodwill! haha. great find... would love to throw some stone inlay in all those bark inclusions and re sand it down to a smooooth 600 grit:)very cool
You must have E.S.P.--It WAS at a local Goodwill! Sticker price--$49.95
That's much higher than pieces I normally buy at Goodwill--hope I didn't overpay.

I would be interested in your suggestion about the stone inlay. Is this a difficult process? How would one go about doing this? Thanks!
 

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You must have E.S.P.--It WAS at a local Goodwill! Sticker price--$49.95
That's much higher than pieces I normally buy at Goodwill--hope I didn't overpay.

I would be interested in your suggestion about the stone inlay. Is this a difficult process? How would one go about doing this? Thanks!
A burl of that size is very expensive. Burl is normally sold by weight. $5 - $10 / lb. I think you got a great deal.

As stated earlier this looks to have been carved rather than turned. I can understand it would be much easier to carve this large burl than turn since the desire is to keep the outer shape.

Likely carved out at least 1/2 the original weight.

One method to fill the inclusions with a decorative stone like appearance is a resin call In-Lace. Not cheap, but can make a piece really stand out. Read the instructions about the amount of hardener and have a method to know the weight of the resin so you know how many drops of the hardener to use.

It needs 12 hours to cure, so overnight works well, and then can be sanded or turned. Need good dust collection, the sanding creates a LOT of dust. It is worth the effort though.

http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Mer...=packard&Category_Code=proj-supp-inlay-inlace

Some folks grind stones and mix with epoxy. If you choose this method, do a test with the stones and the epoxy. Sometimes the stone material can affect the curing of the epoxy.

Cuerodoc uses stone/epoxy to fill inclusions. Not sure if In-Lace or home mixture. One example.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f6/euro-nice-53626/
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
A burl of that size is very expensive. Burl is normally sold by weight. $5 - $10 / lb. I think you got a great deal.

As stated earlier this looks to have been carved rather than turned. I can understand it would be much easier to carve this large burl than turn since the desire is to keep the outer shape.

Likely carved out at least 1/2 the original weight.

One method to fill the inclusions with a decorative stone like appearance is a resin call In-Lace. Not cheap, but can make a piece really stand out. Read the instructions about the amount of hardener and have a method to know the weight of the resin so you know how many drops of the hardener to use.

It needs 12 hours to cure, so overnight works well, and then can be sanded or turned. Need good dust collection, the sanding creates a LOT of dust. It is worth the effort though.

http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Mer...=packard&Category_Code=proj-supp-inlay-inlace

Some folks grind stones and mix with epoxy. If you choose this method, do a test with the stones and the epoxy. Sometimes the stone material can affect the curing of the epoxy.

Cuerodoc uses stone/epoxy to fill inclusions. Not sure if In-Lace or home mixture. One example.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f6/euro-nice-53626/
Thanks again for great info! I am definitely going to look into this!
 

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Yep , thats a great burl bowl .
I'd just wash it with warm water and a soft bristle brush , air dry it , and oil it well with mineral oil .

As it stands , it is a fine artwork and fruit bowl , just as it is .
It needs no further embellishment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yep , thats a great burl bowl .
I'd just wash it with warm water and a soft bristle brush , air dry it , and oil it well with mineral oil .

As it stands , it is a fine artwork and fruit bowl , just as it is .
It needs no further embellishment.
Thanks so much. After drying, should I oil both sides, or just the interior?
(I'm assuming interior only--the exterior still has bark.
 

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tough to say... as a work of art it could go for whatever someone wants to pay for it. As a burl if it were purchased in whole form I would imagine it would go for around 1000 bucks maybe a little less maybe more but in that area
 

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Thanks so much. After drying, should I oil both sides, or just the interior?
(I'm assuming interior only--the exterior still has bark.
Post a photo or two of the outside . The bark may help to identify the wood , and to see if any oil could or should be applied to it .
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
tough to say... as a work of art it could go for whatever someone wants to pay for it. As a burl if it were purchased in whole form I would imagine it would go for around 1000 bucks maybe a little less maybe more but in that area
WOW--I'm pleasantly surprised at that! Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thats great to see , the wood just under the bark by the looks of it .

Oil that too I reckon
Yes--where they flattened off a spot for the bowl to rest on, you can see how thin the bark really is.

I don't have mineral oil. Where would you get that--hardware? drugstore? Are there any suitable alternatives, or is mineral oil best? Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Man, I'd have been all over that buy in a heart beat.
Clean and oil. Nothing else for my tastes.
Bill
Yes, me too--but when I tried to pick it up to take to the cash register, it's like it was glued to the floor-I'd say 100 pounds easily! Had to get a clerk to come help.
As we were loading, one of the workers (who hadn't seen me) say UGH, somebody really bought that thing?
 

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Yes--where they flattened off a spot for the bowl to rest on, you can see how thin the bark really is.

I don't have mineral oil. Where would you get that--hardware? drugstore? Are there any suitable alternatives, or is mineral oil best? Thanks!
The surface you see in that last photo does not look like bark to me .
It looks to be the outer surface wood of the burl itself .

Here is another example of the outer wood of a burl



When it comes to burls , think warts :thumbsup:
 
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