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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, i have been on forums for every other topic in my life so why not wood working :)

Im attempting to use some wood my wife purchased awhile back for a project that failed. Its 9"'x2"x3'? Pine i guess? I said what they hey lets play with this wood and see if i can put together a simple butcher block top(im starting out again). This is what happened and im not sure why. It was clamped for 24 hours. I used lots of "Gorilla brand wood glue" painted it on for full coverage and it looked great when i pulled it out of the clamps.

I ripped the boards and built the board in an hour or less if that matters. Im kind of bumbed out now.

Prinler
 

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Gorilla glue

From what I understand this type of glue expands when wet and it will actually push the boards apart. Also has no more holding power than titebond. Something I recently learned as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
This glue? No good?

image-3967885862.jpg
 

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Gorilla sell a yellow glue similar to Titebond I, II or III and also a urethane glue.

I do not recommend the urethane glue. It expands with moisture and tests show the glue joint is the weakest compared to yellow glues.

Were the joints straight and with no gaps?

It is important to edge joint the pieces so that in dry fit, they have no gaps.

If you try to force fit the pieces to close any gaps with clamps, the joints will have a lot of stress and the joints may fail like yours.

You said you have had the wood for a long period. This is good, since it should have reached a moisture content the same as the surroundings.

I would re-check the edges, straighten where needed and try again with Titebond yellow glue. Add enough glue so that you see squeeze out. You want to ensure the joint is not starved of glue.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I cut all of the wood with my new to me table saw. It went together textbook. No gaps and glue squeezing out. I cleaned the squish out with a damp rag. Looked so good yesterday. I get home and WTF moment. I tried to wack the wood to see if it would break and its solid as a rock just messed up.

So new glue? More clamps?
 

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I cut all of the wood with my new to me table saw. It went together textbook. No gaps and glue squeezing out. I cleaned the squish out with a damp rag. Looked so good yesterday. I get home and WTF moment. I tried to wack the wood to see if it would break and its solid as a rock just messed up.

So new glue? More clamps?
Clean the edges via sanding or table saw.

New glue, recommend a Titebond Yellow glue. Should only need a couple of clamps.

My preferred method is to glue up two pieces at a time to make sub-assemblies.

I then glue two sub-assemblies together, etc.

I do not like trying to glue everything in one shot. I am not able to get the control of the gluing as desired.

Try the sub-assemblies. Not much to lose, just takes a bit more time.
 

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+1 with Dave.
Also gorilla wood glue is different than the original gorilla glue. IMO I love using gorilla wood glue. It has a fast initial tack.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
This wood could be an issue?

image-3284156792.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #10

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I don't know if this really helps or not, but as you glue the pieces together pay attention to the end grain. lay out the parts so that one end grain is pointing up and the next points down. The arks should always alternate between up and down.

I made a cabinet top from the same kind of wood many years ago that I attached to a cabinet that is right next to our stove and even given the extremes in temperature and humidity changes found in a kitchen have never had any separation issues.
 

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Discussion Starter #13

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Discussion Starter #14
Ok upon glueing the wood has already began to make gaps. Almost like the glue warps it.

image-189340947.jpg
 

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Couple of things to try

If what you need in the project length is say 10'' work with 11'' to 12'' this will let you align the wood Steve said it right. Clamp times of 30min. allow you to clamp in pairs then take those pairs and clamp them together until you have them all clamped. Don't rush the process. I see you are using a brush toss it get your fingers involved they can feel if you have any incursions in the glue and you can pick it out if any are present, much easier to get a smoother spread of the glue. Spread on both surfaces, not too thick a nice thin layer to much glue causes problems as well you should be able to see the grain of the wood. Hope that this might help. What do you have for clamps some out on the market shouldn't be there they have no holding power pipe clamps work good or wood clamps way better than some of the plastic ones that are sold in bb stores

Jerry
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I need more clamps for sure! Let me try only clamping 2 + 2
 

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For flat sawn pine , you need a minimum of 150 lbs of clamping pressure per square inch. For quarter-sawn pine you need 300 lbs per sq. inch. Thats for a soft wood. The clamping pressure needed increases exponentially for harder woods. For example ...for red oak flat sawn, you need 900 lbs per sq. inch. Due to the denser wood fibers.

Since I haven't seen any clamps , I'm assuming you are underclamping or using a clamp that isn't designed for heavier duty glue-ups. Irwin quick clamps are great if used according to their design parameters.

The heavy-duty plastic clamps (Irwins) are usually only rated for around 300 lbs per sq. inch. So you would need one clamp about every 2 inches along that project to have sufficient clamping power. Assuming its soft pine and flat sawn.

My guess is that you need bar clamps spaced about 6 inches apart or closer.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
It's wood glue. Looks just like every other wood glue... Not the foaming expanding glue.
 

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It's wood glue. Looks just like every other wood glue... Not the foaming expanding glue.
All wood glue contains water/moisture. The glue releases that moisture into the wood which will cause the wood to swell. Sufficient clamping pressure is needed to overcome that and prevent the joint from opening. What doesn't squeeze out will be forced into the crushed wood fibers.
 
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