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Discussion Starter #1
I cut a lot of these pieces out off plywood 3/8 thick
I make a quite a few of these for a project I do.
first i cut the 4x8 ply into 2x4 pieces (more manageable) then set table saw to 45 degree and rip strips 1 1/4 wide out of the entire sheet
then i take a chop saw and mark 5" length on base and cut a group of 8 or so at a time into 5" lengths. once i get my container full of these
I sand them to get the 60 degree cut on one end of the piece.

I am looking for an easier way or equipment that would help save time and labor with breaking the bank.

I'm sure a heavier table saw would help but this is awkward cutting into strips as it is.
Thanks for your help
see the attachement for a picture of what it looks like (kinda)
 

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Your pic didn't upload, sgarver. Are you having trouble cutting a 60 degree angle or bevel? Even when a saw won't tip or angle enough, you can often reposition the work and cut the complimentary angle of 90 degrees to get the intended angle or bevel. Most miter saws will not bevel much beyond 45 but they often angle to 60. Instead of cutting with the work flat on the table, you cut with it on edge against the fence.

This same procedure can be used for ripping bevels beyond what the table saw blade will tip, for example. Laying the work flat on the table limits you to 45 +- but placing the work up on edge against the fence and setting the bevel to 30, the 90 compliment of 60, will allow you to rip at 60. Since this can be more difficult to control, you might build a jig to help hold the work, such as an L shaped fence that attaches to the rip fence and the blade projects through.

Making saws cut beyond their adjustments is often done with jigs added to the saw, the fence or miter bar. Making a temporary/disposable fence and table that attaches to a miter saw will allow you to screw down an angled fence as well as set up a stop for repetitive cuts. It will eliminate a large hole at the blade area where work can get pulled through and it will tell you exactly where the blade will cut.
 

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I cannot imagine sanding a 60 deg bevel. Wow, a lot of work.

I would make a jig which would hold these pieces vertical. Since they are the same size you can cut a groove of the width of the pieces for vertical alignment, I would then set the blade to 30 deg and cut the bevel which will then be 60 deg on the piece.

A picture of my vertical cutting jig to give you an idea.

Vertical_cutting_jig_in_postition_1164.jpg
 

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where's my table saw?
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The 60 degree angle is the issue?

It's close to what's called a "scarf" joint. You can make a sled for your table saw as shown in this video at 4:20 ....skip the first part. :yes:

http://www.veoh.com/watch/v15574729RnSTfDCR?h1=Making+a+Scarf+Joint

The cool thing is that your cutoff can be flipped over with the same angle already on it and it can be used for the next piece. So you'd rip all your long lengths first, then cut the 60's and finally the 45's. The plywood should have 2 good sides for this process since you are using both faces.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
sanding Not the hard part

sanding the ends to 60 degree is not the hard part, it goes really fast with .40 sanding pad on disc sander.
cutting the strips to 1 1/4 width is the hardest part.
I rip at 45 angle then flip the 2x4 sheet and rip the other side witch leaves the sides cut correctly then flip and cut again and it cuts the next strip. its hard to keep it all running straight and awkward to do.
I was looking to see if anyone had a better idea of how i could do that part.
cutting them off to 5" length is not really to bad either its the ripping that gets me.
thanks
Steve
 

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cutting the strips to 1 1/4 width is the hardest part.
I rip at 45 angle then flip the 2x4 sheet and rip the other side witch leaves the sides cut correctly then flip and cut again and it cuts the next strip. its hard to keep it all running straight and awkward to do.
I was looking to see if anyone had a better idea of how i could do that part.
Not obvious from the original post.

Ripping is a fast task with a table saw. I do not know how to speed up ripping.

If you need to help to keep things straight consider the Grip Tite Magnetic Featherboard. It will hold the piece down and towards the fence. You will still need to flip. Not sure how to avoid the flipping.

http://grip-tite.com/Site/Products-and-Prices.html
 
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