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I’m working on making a turning that will look like an ice cream cone. Originally, I was just going to turn it, but now I’m thinking about trying to re-produce the waffle pattern that’s on the cone (see the area in the picture surrounded by the red outline).

I’ve thought about making it from segments separated by contrasting veneer and I’ve thought about doing it with laser engraving. The area engraved by a laser will appear black and the segments separated by veneer will leave a smooth surface after turning which really isn’t how a cone really looks. So, neither of those ideas seems terribly appealing.

I’d love some fresh ideas. Any are appreciated.

By the way, I have no carving skills whatsoever.
 

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what about cutting 1/4" disks and stacking them? make the raised part out of a larger disk?
 

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Does it have to be made out of wood? If not, maybe you could find someone with a laser printer that could do it. Or, maybe you could use a real cone to make a mold from and then use casting resin.
 

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Smart and Cool
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Visually you could glue up the pieces to turn.

You want something that creates contrast, but not a big contrast.

I would think the same wood, but different grain orientation for the "ribs", that would give it a little difference, but not huge.
 

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Discussion Starter #9

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where's my table saw?
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Great idea!

The turning while tapered is straight. I think I would turn it with the horizontal ridges and then glue on the vertical ridges between.

You would have difficulty gluing on the horizontal bands, so turning them as part of the cone is best. Then fill in between them with vertical strips the same thickness and you're done! :smile2:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The turning while tapered is straight. I think I would turn it with the horizontal ridges and then glue on the vertical ridges between.
I like it! I'd better get a good pair of tweezers. Any ideas on how to make all those tiny pieces?
 

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I like it! I'd better get a good pair of tweezers. Any ideas on how to make all those tiny pieces?
Unless I missed it you never answered the question of how big the pieces are. You may be able to rip the strips on a table saw with a new zero clearance coverplate on your tablesaw. Then cut the lengths on a bandsaw.
 

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He had said 3.5" diameter. Trying to reference vertical pieces. Is the 3.5" bottom of the cone. Or at opening?

Either I'm guessing the little verticals are 1/8"-1/16" squares?

Not that the advice holds much weight. If it was me, id take 1"-2" stock, shave off the size needed.

Take the 1"x1/16" paint stick piece, combination straight edge, knife, chisel..

1/16×1/16... probably mess up a few, small pieces though.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
My bad. In my excitement to reply, gave bad info earlier. The large diameter of the cone is about 3-1/2", but the waffle pattered Part is abut 2-1/2". Each waffle square is about 3/16". Of course I can adjust that a little bit if necessary (artist's license :)
 

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most often it's done by cutting grooves.
scroll down on this page for his Dairy Queen presentation
https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/576281/texas-dairy-queen-art


you could carve out the dimpled areas - you would not be able to say you had no carving skills when you're done, however.....
Damn! Somebody beat me to it. Just when you think you have an original idea!!! Drat!
Quickstep,
Would you be happy with an end product which duplicates the Dairy Queen artwork? If so I don't see where any "dimpled areas" were carved into that piece. It looks to me like the narrow areas are grooves and the broader areas are the original turned diameter.
If not, then stop reading my reply and disregard the rest of what follows. :wink:


If grooves would be acceptable, then a person could cut both sets of grooves while the piece is still in the lathe.

The radial grooves would of course be cut while the piece is spinning.

The grooves running lengthwise, would need to be manually cut while the lathe was locked with the indexing plate, using the tool rest as a guide to keep them straight and inline lengthwise. The number of available spacings built into the indexing plate (and how many were used) would determine the spacing of the lengthwise grooves. The spacing of the radial grooves would be placed to generate squares as shown in the Dairy Queen artwork.
 

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Egg Spurt
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most often it's done by cutting grooves.
scroll down on this page for his Dairy Queen presentation
https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/576281/texas-dairy-queen-art


you could carve out the dimpled areas - you would not be able to say you had no carving skills when you're done, however.....
I read "staples" and immediately thought of the little metal versions and spent the next several minutes looking for them in the images only to later realize they meant staple products like things we're all very familiar with..
 

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Did you consider very thin strips of wood bent and glued down? Never mind..I failed to read every post in the thread..
 
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