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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I recently added 220V outlets to my shop. I put my dust collector in the attic and for now have been plugging the cord into the outlet to turn on the dust collector and unplugging it to turn it off. I would like to add a switch to the circuit that the dust collector is on. I purchased a DPST 18A 220V momentary switch but am unsure how to interpret the wiring diagram to get it wired properly. I have 10/3 wire to the outlet and my plan is to add the switch into the circuit.

The wiring image is straight forward where the switch breaks the connection between 1:2 and 3:4; however, I'm confused by the labeling of the 5 pins. On the left side, the pins are labeled 13 and 14, and on the right side the pins are labeled 23 and 24. There also the odd pin labeled A1. I'm not sure which pins to connect my wires to. I've got 2 hot wires coming from the breaker and I want to switch both of those wires before they go to the outlet. So my question is: which pins should I connect the 2 hot wires from the breaker, and which pins should I connect the 2 wires that will go to the outlet?

thanks
 

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This should e checked with a VOM first, but I would say the saw can go to the 14/24 pair, and the breaker to the 13/23 pair. Or the reverse, the switch isn't directional, and I'm looking at the divider between the lugs; which makes me think this is the right way. . With a VOM you check to see which to see which pair are continuous when the switch is engaged. Switch on, if the 13 and 14 lugs are continuous, then my suggestion would be good. They would also not be continuous with the switch off. Same for the other side. If for some reason that's not how they work....my whole suggestion is crap (I say, nervously). Realize, I'm not an EE (or an electrician) but I could test that to confirm my thinking.....I hope you can as well.
 

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I agree with Fred, I also agree that you should check it out with an Ohmmeter before doing anything with it.
One question though, why a momentary switch?? :blink: or is that a momentary? I don't really see a need for an off button on a momentary switch.
 

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That terminal numbering is according to a European standard. I think you have to buy the standard it to see it, but I believe the first digit is the "pole" (poles 1 or 2 of the double pole). The second digit refers to what kind of contact it is. I think the "4" (14 & 24) means it is a normally open (NO) contact. Don't know what the 3 means. The 1A is a coil terminal. On a relay there would also be a "2A" terminal for the other side of the coil, but according to the little schematic, the other side of the coil is connected to the 14 terminal.

This implies this is a magnetic switch activated by a momentary contact. Doing some guessing here, but you probably want to energize the coil when you push the green button, so the line side would have to go to 13 & 23 and load to 14 & 24. May have to connect A1 to 24 to hold the switch in.

This is how I would try it, but someone who knows for sure should chime in.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The product was sold as a momentary switch, but I don't believe it is the more I learn about it. I think it is a standard stdp switch, unless the activation from one state to the other is somehow done internally by a momentary switch. It was sold as a motor start switch and looks like it will do exactly what I want it to do. I plan to have the switch hanging in the middle of my shop so I can reach it easily from most of my machines.

Thank you for all the suggestions, I will break out my ohm meter and check out how the switch operates. I'm not a EE, but I had a few classes and some practical experience on my way to a ME degree.
 

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It is a magnetic switch. If wired correctly, when you momentarily push the green button, the coil energizes and holds the contacts closed after the green button is released. Push the red button momentarily, and the coil is de-energized, opening the contacts.

Also, if you lose power while the contacts are closed (e.g. a breaker tripping), the coil is de-energized, and the machine won't start when the power is restored as it would with an ordinary switch. This is a safety feature.

This is often called a motor start switch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks all. I believe you are all correct. When I push the on button, it doesn't stay pushed in. However when I hold the on button in and push the off button simultaneously, I can feel it mechanically pushing the on button outward. So I think Ed is right on with the magnetic switch.

I also verified with my ohmmeter that the 13 14 pair are coupled only when holding the on switch. Same goes for the 23 24 pair.

Thanks for helping me think through this.

I like the idea of the remote, but this solution is about $15 compared with the $115 cost of the remote. Plus my shop is so small I can reach this stationary switch from just about anywhere in the shop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Quick update: I was able to get some cable and connectors today and got the switch wired up. My VOM confirmed all was well. I plugged in my dust collector, and pushing the on button turned on the dust collector - hallelujah. However, the switch won't stay on.

Any recommendations on how to engage the magnet? The wiring diagram looks like the A1 post gets connected to the 14 pin. However, it would seem like if that were the case, it would be wired that way internally. Any thoughts?
 

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if the assumption were made that the coil voltage was the same as the contact rating, then you would connect the wire from A1 to pin 24. if the coil voltage rating is some other voltage (say 120 v) i don't see it on the label, then you would apply neutral to A1. a quick call to where you bought it may help to determine the coil voltage.

the coil is often not wired internally because the contacts are generally universal in that you can apply any voltage up to the voltage rating (eg 250vac). the coil voltage rating is more specific in its needs to operate correctly. in other words, the voltage on the contacts may not be what is needed for the coil to operate.

note: contact set 1 has a higher current rating to carry the load of the coil.
 

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I agree with TimPa. being a "momentary" switch it is working as it was intended. ( contacts closed only when the switch is pressed) A call to the manufacturer may give you options.
Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks. I'll test by connecting A1 to one of the load side terminals.

I initially contacted the manufacturer of the switch, but their reply was "the diagram is on the switch, please use that."

After I bought this switch, I learned that Grizzly sells a very similar switch that probably would have been much clearer in its wiring and installation.

Thanks for the replies.
 

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Thanks. I'll test by connecting A1 to one of the load side terminals.

I initially contacted the manufacturer of the switch, but their reply was "the diagram is on the switch, please use that."

After I bought this switch, I learned that Grizzly sells a very similar switch that probably would have been much clearer in its wiring and installation.

Thanks for the replies.
if you are going to test it that way, not "... one of the load side terminals", use terminal 24. terminal 14 would apply the same potential at both ends of the coil - no work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
TimPa said:
if you are going to test it that way, not "... one of the load side terminals", use terminal 24. terminal 14 would apply the same potential at both ends of the coil - no work.
Nice catch. I now understand what you wrote and how it relates to the wiring diagram on the switch body. THANKS!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks to TimPa. Your instructions worked like a charm! I'm so glad there are so many members here who are much smarter than I am and are willing to share their talents.
 

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where's my table saw?
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so, is this how it works?

if the assumption were made that the coil voltage was the same as the contact rating, then you would connect the wire from A1 to pin 24. if the coil voltage rating is some other voltage (say 120 v) i don't see it on the label, then you would apply neutral to A1. a quick call to where you bought it may help to determine the coil voltage.


note: contact set 1 has a higher current rating to carry the load of the coil.
Do you jumper from A1 to 24?
Then pressing the green "ON" and holding until the coil energizes will connect 14 to 13 and 24 to 23 ?

To turn "OFF", just bump the red OFF button?

BTW where did you source the switch, for someone who may want one?

:blink: thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
TimPa, your schematic on the side of the switch would have been far more helpful than what was there. Yes, I jumpered between A1 and 24.

I purchased the switch from Amazon and it was shipped from China. Total cost was $11 and included free shipping. It arrived in less than a week.

Woodnthings, your understanding is correct. Pushing the green closes the contacts and energizes the coil. It is instantaneous so no need to hold in green for very long. Pushing red mechanically disengages the contacts.

As TimPa pointed out, one of the safety benefits if this type of switch is that in the event of a power outage, the switch will disengage so the machine will not turn on when power is restored.
 

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TimPa, your schematic on the side of the switch would have been far more helpful than what was there. Yes, I jumpered between A1 and 24.

I purchased the switch from Amazon and it was shipped from China. Total cost was $11 and included free shipping. It arrived in less than a week.

Woodnthings, your understanding is correct. Pushing the green closes the contacts and energizes the coil. It is instantaneous so no need to hold in green for very long. Pushing red mechanically disengages the contacts.

As TimPa that was ed h, credit is where credit is due :^) pointed out, one of the safety benefits if this type of switch is that in the event of a power outage, the switch will disengage so the machine will not turn on when power is restored.
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