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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am going to use TransTint dye on my next project. I have used this once before and had lots of difficulty with overlap marks because the dye diluted in denatured alcohol dried too quickly. I did get help for Steve and Rick and Cabinetman. This time I am planning to dilute with water to increase the drying time.

I have 2 questions.

How long should I wait before applying stain over the dye if I decide to do that?

I have some Behlen’s Solar Lux retarder – can I use it to retard the drying time of TransTint dye?

Thanks.

Gary
 

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Since you are applying the dye by hand instead of spraying it would be better if it was thinned a little more than normal and quickly mop it on. This should help on the lap marks. If you do get lap marks have a bucket of water and a rag handy to wipe it down to blend it. Depending on what wood you use and how damp the weather is you should be able to stain in about two hours this time of year. The water needs to dry out of it is all you have to worry about. In cooler weather or if it is especially damp it will take longer. You should be able to look at it and tell when the water is gone. The color will go really pastel almost like it did before you put the dye on.
 

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Rick Mosher
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Just use the water to thin and get the entire surface wet evenly before wiping off excess (this is much easier if you have the capability to spray on the stain before wiping but not necessary).

If there are any inside corners or applied moldings make SURE to blow out the excess stain with an air nozzle or it will crawl out after the rest of the stain has dried and will ruin your stain job. Do samples first and if it is a small sample make sure to leave the stain on wet for the same amount of time it will take to wet the entire surface of your project before wiping off. That will give you a more accurate color. If it is too intense or dark just thin with more water.

If you are going to do multiple steps I think it makes sense to do a step sample. After each step place a piece of 2" tape over the board and proceed to the next step all the way to finish. When done peel off all the tape pieces and you will have an easy to duplicate, step by step process of what you did.

In the summer I find that water stain dries in an hour and can be sprayed over then (I have tested this with a moisture meter and have never had an issue but if you're worried just wait overnight)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Since you are applying the dye by hand instead of spraying it would be better if it was thinned a little more than normal and quickly mop it on. This should help on the lap marks. If you do get lap marks have a bucket of water and a rag handy to wipe it down to blend it. Depending on what wood you use and how damp the weather is you should be able to stain in about two hours this time of year. The water needs to dry out of it is all you have to worry about. In cooler weather or if it is especially damp it will take longer. You should be able to look at it and tell when the water is gone. The color will go really pastel almost like it did before you put the dye on.
Steve, useful feedback - thank you. I will be using the dye on mahogany veneer on a fairly large dresser so will have to move quickly. The tip of keeping water on hand to wipe down and blend is something that I would not have thought of.

Gary
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Just use the water to thin and get the entire surface wet evenly before wiping off excess (this is much easier if you have the capability to spray on the stain before wiping but not necessary).

If there are any inside corners or applied moldings make SURE to blow out the excess stain with an air nozzle or it will crawl out after the rest of the stain has dried and will ruin your stain job. Do samples first and if it is a small sample make sure to leave the stain on wet for the same amount of time it will take to wet the entire surface of your project before wiping off. That will give you a more accurate color. If it is too intense or dark just thin with more water.

If you are going to do multiple steps I think it makes sense to do a step sample. After each step place a piece of 2" tape over the board and proceed to the next step all the way to finish. When done peel off all the tape pieces and you will have an easy to duplicate, step by step process of what you did.

In the summer I find that water stain dries in an hour and can be sprayed over then (I have tested this with a moisture meter and have never had an issue but if you're worried just wait overnight)
Rick, there are some very useful tips in your response. I generally disassemble my refinishing pieces to the point where there are no inside corners but I never would have considered using an air nozzle to blow out the corners. What a bad problem to be able to avoid.

Sampling is onerous but obviously necessary based on your experience. I am learning to do it as part of every project these days. And waiting overnight is generally what I do anyway so there should be issue with that.

Gary
 

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Blowing the stain out of corners sounds like a good idea to me. Moping the stain on by hand even around door panels and the side panels on furniture the stain can leach out making dark blotches.
 

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I've read that some folks mix transtint in a 50/50 mix of water and alcohol. This slows it down, but will raise the grain. I've also read about mixing at half strength or weaker and just apply multiple coats.
 
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