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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey y'all. I was just give a lathe from my dad who had it in a sea can. I've been playing around with it turning spindles. I'm not read for bowls yet. But when I do order some more stuff. What should I get? How would i know what fits when i order? And how do i remove this?
427265
 

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You should be able to lock up the spindle and unscrew it with a wrench, once it is off you should see external threads and a tapered hole. Determine the size and thread pitch and you can order a chuck to thread on the spindle. You can get other accessories with a Morse taper that fit in the tapered hole such as drive spurs, drill chucks, etc.
 

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The secret to unscrewing a threaded piece is to lock it so it can't spin, place the wrench on the nut, extend the wrench handle with a short pipe, give the pipe a smart whack with a hammer, a wood block or stick, and that will usually do it.
You can drive a wood wedge between the 3 step pulley and the housing to prevent rotation OR you can clamp the V belt together with a squeeze clamp.
The rotation will be clockwise facing the spindle. Unscrew it CCW. It may be only be tapered, in which case drive it out from the other end with 1/2" rod.
 

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How would I lock it so I can unscrew?

Any chucks that you would reccomend??

Also would that spin clockwise or counterclockwise?
What I would try is to hold both sides of the belt in my left hand while unscrewing the spur with a wrench. If it's not overly tight it should come off. If that didn't work you might try clamping a hand screw to the lower side of the belt and see if that does it.
 

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Do you know the make and model number? You may be able to find an online manual which will give you information SPECIFIC to your lathe. That information should/will include the answers to your questions.

As to generic advise; It is plain to see there is a hex on one end.

What is the other end like? Is there a hex (internal or external)? Is there any kind of slotted flat on the shaft suitable for a wrench? Is there any kind of cross hole, suitable for a round rod, to immobilize the shaft while the spur is being loosened?
 

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good advice above.

with the belt(s) on, and a properly fitting box end wrench on the spur, give the end of the wrench a few sharp wraps with a hammer. it should be CCW as you face it. is there a set of "flats" somewhere else on that shaft that you can get a wrench on?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Update. It came of with no problem at all. It is a 7/8 but I haven't measured the tpi yet. Thanks for the help so far. I'll have more questions.
 

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If it is 7/8" diameter it is likely 14 TPI, you may want to consider an adapter to 1" - 8 TPI which is more common so easier to find accessories for it.
ain't that the truth. a lot of old lathes used the 7/8"x14 spindle
you can buy stuff to fit but not much that didn't come with the lathe
 

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Beside the adapter. What should I buy? I'm thinking a 4 claw clamp for bowls. Brands? Other ideas?
I'd start with a face plate. Then, you can work with glue blocks, jam chucks, etc., with minimal cost. It's very easy to get sucked into buying a lot of expensive accessories, such that soon the lathe itself is your cheapest item. From your questions and terminology, it sounds as though you're completely new to the world of lathes- by a "4 claw clamp", you probably mean a 4 jaw chuck. Get a book from the library or Amazon on basic woodturning, or, better yet, find somebody in your area willing to show you the ropes of woodturning before jumping in the deep end, investment-wise. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I'd start with a face plate. Then, you can work with glue blocks, jam chucks, etc., with minimal cost. It's very easy to get sucked into buying a lot of expensive accessories, such that soon the lathe itself is your cheapest item. From your questions and terminology, it sounds as though you're completely new to the world of lathes- by a "4 claw clamp", you probably mean a 4 jaw chuck. Get a book from the library or Amazon on basic woodturning, or, better yet, find somebody in your area willing to show you the ropes of woodturning before jumping in the deep end, investment-wise. Good luck!
I have zero dollars in so far. I'd love to know what to buy if you have a link.

I've been on youtube a bit but we are in a lockdown right now so libraries and experts are not in my cards right now.

I'm asking here so I don't buy a bunch of stuff I don't need.
I am new. Just got a lathe dropped off with some basic chisels.
 

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I have zero dollars in so far. I'd love to know what to buy if you have a link.

I've been on youtube a bit but we are in a lockdown right now so libraries and experts are not in my cards right now.

I'm asking here so I don't buy a bunch of stuff I don't need.
I am new. Just got a lathe dropped off with some basic chisels.
There are woodworking / woodturning clubs and guilds all around. Most of them are using Zoom for meetings, which works during lockdowns. With Zoom, you don't have to be close to one, and most of them invite guests to their meetings. Where are you located, somewhere in Canada?

What kind of woodturning tools do you have? You said "chisels". If they are typical high speed steel (HSS) gouges, scrapers, and skew chisels, you will definitely need a way to sharpen them. Considering the age of the lathe, they are steel turning tools that will need frequent sharpening. The pros stop and touch up their tools as they work, sometimes several times an hour. If they are newer carbide-tipped turning tools, then you can rotate the tips, then buy replacements after rotating them all the way around. You can also sharpen most carbide tips on a flat diamond stone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Ya. I'm in remote Canada. Lots of trees not lots of turners. I'll look into some canadian groups.

I have a set of HHS chisels. Some basic stuff not the carbide. I have my knife sharpening stuff with a grinder. So what I've seen that might work. I've looked at some video that teach about it.

I'm basically looking to turn a bowl for a hobby. Nothing expensive or serious.
 

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If it is a typical high speed wheel bench grinder, then please be very careful with it. It is easy to overheat the turning tools. It happens so quickly, almost instantly. You can ruin the temper of the steel, which means that it won't hold an edge at all. If it happens, you have to grind down to fresh steel, which takes a lot of patience, because you don't want to keep overheating the tool as you restore it. It isn't easy to avoid with a typical bench grinder, so be extra careful.

Most woodturners use a low speed grinder for HSS tools, or they switch to carbide turning tools.
 
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