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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am replacing the bottom on a piano bench. It's made out of cherry. The Staples are held very strongly in fact some of them have snapped off when I've tried to remove them. Along the length of the piano bench I have had no problem because I have access. However, the placement of the Staples on the end pieces makes it nearly impossible to use anything to remove the Staples. I've included a picture of the problem. Any suggestions on how to best remove the Staples without damage?
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I would get a Dremel grinder, Multi-Tool, or Angle Grinder and cut them off flush with the wood and call it good.
 
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Those weren't the proper staples to have been used in the first place. I run across these every now and then... and yes they break often. Use a pair of electrical pliers or any heavy duty pliers to remove them. If you have to buy a pair of pliers, get a good pair, preferably made in America, and make sure the jaws close completely. With some of those foreign pliers, the jaws don't close completely.

Sonny
 

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The easiest way I have found is to use a thin flathead to pry them up from the center.
 
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I use bullnosed snips, (aka end cutting pliers. Gently squeeze so as not to cut the staple, and rotate forward or backwards on the curved of the snips and you wond leave any marks in the wood. Quick and easy, and no metal left in the wood to rip your sand paper.
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i actually use both posts above, a small screwdriver to elevate the staple for a good purchase by the end nippers. the trick with the end nippers is to not squeeze so hard that you cut through the staple.
 

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Well Guys, I'm gonna disagree with you all with regard to using a small screw driver and nipper pliers. Those staples are not typical upholstery staples. Those are crown molding staples. A screw driver small enough to fit inside the staple prongs is likely not strong enough to lift the staple... the screw driver tip will likely break. The OP has already mentioned the difficulty lifting the staples.

Even using a dedicated staple remover, those CM staples often break. As an upholsterer, I've tried nipper pliers before. They aren't efficient. Blunt or heavy pliers, like electrical pliers, work best.

A dedicated CS Osborne #120 staple remover (staple lifter) is a good tool to have in your arsenal and not just for upholstery applications. I have a dozen of these (sharp ones) in my upholstery shop and several dull ones in the woodshop. They come in handy for tasks other than upholstery. I've had one prong break (long term use), but still the second prong remains.

Sonny
 

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I use bullnosed snips, (aka end cutting pliers. Gently squeeze so as not to cut the staple, and rotate forward or backwards on the curved of the snips and you wond leave any marks in the wood. Quick and easy, and no metal left in the wood to rip your sand paper.
View attachment 428416

I agree. I worked in an upholstery shop when I was in school. First job for a newbie. Then I pulled staples out of cabinet for the next 30 years.

Agree I must...
 

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I just reupholstered my boat seats and bunks not too long ago. Glad I bought a couple cases of staples for poker tables for the pnumatic gun...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
These staples are 1.5 inch and, being 25 years old, they are in solid... I actually took a long screwdriver and ground the end to a tapering point and torched it to bend a 90 degree about 1 inch up... I had to hammer it in under the head of the staples to get them to start moving. Then used regular pliers to folcrum them out.. (That worked fo the ones in the length of the bench). The ones pictured, I tried to pry them out with it and broke the end off.... Tried the small flathead but it bent. Because of the angle, bullnose snips won't work with the edge of wood sticking up.... guess I'll dremel them..
 

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Try the nips but only pull on one leg. I've found for stubborn crown staples that won't come out easily that if you only grab one leg you can usually get it to release.
 

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Slip a thin bladed screw driver under the staple and give it a tap downward to overcome the grab the wood has achieved over the years. It may pry up without too much strain on the blade. Then you can lift each leg with a proper end cutter pliers or a Chanel lock. Any pliers with a rounded bottom you can use as a fulcrum is good.

I use the "hit it down first" technique when pulling 12" landscape nails from old timbers. It breaks the bond the wood has on the metal and makes them easier to pull up.
 

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Slip a thin bladed screw driver under the staple and give it a tap downward to overcome the grab the wood has achieved over the years. It may pry up without too much strain on the blade. Then you can lift each leg with a proper end cutter pliers or a Chanel lock. Any pliers with a rounded bottom you can use as a fulcrum is good.

I use the "hit it down first" technique when pulling 12" landscape nails from old timbers. It breaks the bond the wood has on the metal and makes them easier to pull up.
I had forgotten all about the "hit down" technique.

george
 

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If you can't slip a screwdriver under them and pop them out I would leave them and hammer them down. You can do more damage to the furniture trying to get staples out than it's worth. When prying them out I would put a putty knife under the screwdriver to protect the wood.
 

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Years ago, I read a great article about the pressure it took to pull nails after they'd been in wood for different periods of time. A freshly pounded nail was relatively easy. A few weeks in, it took many times the pressure. Years in, more than double that.

I always use an awl for this kind of problem. A piece of metal, like a scraper, will keep the wood the awl slides on and presses against from being destroyed. I pound the awl in at an angle parallel to the face of the wood the staple is in. This raises the staple and allows me to pull it with a nail puller [by rocking back].

Once in a while it doesn't work and I have to otherwise deal with the fact.
 

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Grab and pull straight out with the slide hammer. You can make your own if you replace the original adjustment bolt in the vice grip with a long bolt, and find something to slip on it as a slide hammer. Large deep socket maybe, doesn't have to be super heavy.

 

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Grab and pull straight out with the slide hammer. You can make your own if you replace the original adjustment bolt in the vice grip with a long bolt, and find something to slip on it as a slide hammer. Large deep socket maybe, doesn't have to be super heavy.

Brilliant!!(y)(y)
 

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I am replacing the bottom on a piano bench. It's made out of cherry. The Staples are held very strongly in fact some of them have snapped off when I've tried to remove them. Along the length of the piano bench I have had no problem because I have access. However, the placement of the Staples on the end pieces makes it nearly impossible to use anything to remove the Staples. I've included a picture of the problem. Any suggestions on how to best remove the Staples without damage? View attachment 428407 View attachment 428407
I am replacing the bottom on a piano bench. It's made out of cherry. The Staples are held very strongly in fact some of them have snapped off when I've tried to remove them. Along the length of the piano bench I have had no problem because I have access. However, the placement of the Staples on the end pieces makes it nearly impossible to use anything to remove the Staples. I've included a picture of the problem. Any suggestions on how to best remove the Staples without damage? View attachment 428407 View attachment 428407
I use needle-nose pliers rocking, lifting or both. The secret is raising one leg at a time, as nearly vertically as possible.
 
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