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Discussion Starter #1
I have a wall im considering taking down to re-insulate with sound proofing insulation (between two bedrooms). I hadnt bothered doing this before because both, i couldnt afford it (not that i really can now -_- ), and the way the room was constructed.

This room construction was done before i moved in by previous owners; Not something i did.
But it looks like they wanted to give each room a fresh look without having to do much work or spend much. So i think the room was a typical drywall wall and ceiling. Then they covered the walls with thin themed panels for a look. They also added a second ceiling. Its a few inches below the drywall ceiling. Looks to be made of recycled paper product (tho i could be off on that). - When i got here i had to replace the (i think return) air vent cover. So i could get a small look inside/behind the wall. And it looks like behind the paneling is drywall. Possibly two layers, im not sure. (there was some shoddy dyi work all around the house i came to realize. So u can never discount anything).

The reason i never took the paneling down was because of how they installed it. Im assuming the roof base bare, and then they added the thin themed paneling from the floor to the ceiling. AND THEN, they added the carpet and the new paper ceiling a few inches below. So removing the paneling completely would require removing the paper ceiling. And i didnt want to do that. I also didnt want to remove the carpet.

But unfortunately.. after getting screwed over by a roommate that i was renting the room out to.. i now have to replace the carpet anyway which requires ripping up the one that is in there. And if i have to do that, im only that one ceiling obstetrical away (i would hope) from being able to take down the wall to re-insulate.

So im looking for a way to remove this wall without removing the ceiling and without breaking the wall so it can be put back up. I was considering something like making a long thin cut from end to end just below the new ceiling line (where the trim would cover up) and trying to go from there.

Like i said, given some of the things iv seen here, im sure there will be some unanticipated surprises along the way. But is it doable to bring this down intact? Or is it goign to be a matter or trying to save the paneling and the drywall is a lost cause and would have to be replaced.. And if cutting in along the top of the wall, end to end, below the new ceiling line would work, how exactly would i do that/what tools for that job? Or would a razor be enough (the panel is kind of wood like tho)?

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421290


A litte ms paint job to try an illustrate..
421291
 

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You won't be able to save the wallpaper border at the top. I would remove the trim around that end. Then start in the middle and run a rigid putty knife under the paneling at the seam and see if you can pry it off. If it's put up with construction adhesive it will be awful to get off. You would have to put a strong solvent like lacquer thinner in a squirt bottle and soak the adhesive off. It would probably take many days to get if off like that. Hopefully it's just put on with finishing nails. It would be relatively easy to get off if it doesn't go up behind the ceiling tiles too far. Not being there it's difficult to say what problems you might encounter.

The easiest fix would be if you can find some more of the paneling. That kind of paneling is usually pre-finished. Then you wouldn't have to be careful taking down the old stuff, you could just rip it out. It wouldn't be that costly to just do away with the material if it's replaceable.
 

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Are you trying to save the dry wall also?

Why are you wanting to insulate between two rooms?

George
 

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Discussion Starter #4
im disabled, so i rent the two rooms out to help with the bills. The two rooms share a wall. I dont know if the wall they share is insulated or not, but i figured some sound proofing insulation in that wall would help reduce the noise transfer between them.

id like to save what i can to reuse simply because my lack of funds. But im guessing the dry wall might be harder to save if it is actually finished. Hopefully i can save at least the paneling tho. I think its nailed in. Or at least there were a lot of nails left only half in (like it doubled for a hanging hook). If it is glued, then even that might not be as hopeless as it might seem. Hell, they glued the paneling to the cinder block walls in the basement (horrible idea) and they can right off for the most part.

If im unable to save the drywall would it be ok to put new drywall up and not finish it? And then throw the paneling and trim back up. Or would those cracks/borders lead to issues? If the corners have to be finished then that would mean bringing down more of the panel wall. And im already unsure if i can do that without destroying them or the paper ceiling.
 

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im disabled, so i rent the two rooms out to help with the bills. The two rooms share a wall. I dont know if the wall they share is insulated or not, but i figured some sound proofing insulation in that wall would help reduce the noise transfer between them.

id like to save what i can to reuse simply because my lack of funds. But im guessing the dry wall might be harder to save if it is actually finished. Hopefully i can save at least the paneling tho. I think its nailed in. Or at least there were a lot of nails left only half in (like it doubled for a hanging hook). If it is glued, then even that might not be as hopeless as it might seem. Hell, they glued the paneling to the cinder block walls in the basement (horrible idea) and they can right off for the most part.

If im unable to save the drywall would it be ok to put new drywall up and not finish it? And then throw the paneling and trim back up. Or would those cracks/borders lead to issues? If the corners have to be finished then that would mean bringing down more of the panel wall. And im already unsure if i can do that without destroying them or the paper ceiling.
If you put up new rock you don't have to finish it but I would tape and bed it. It would seal off the wall better and add to your sound proofing cause.

It's not uncommon to insulate interior walls for soundproofing purposes. It should help a lot.
 

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I have a wall im considering taking down to re-insulate with sound proofing insulation (between two bedrooms). I hadnt bothered doing this before because both, i couldnt afford it (not that i really can now -_- ), and the way the room was constructed.

This room construction was done before i moved in by previous owners; Not something i did.
But it looks like they wanted to give each room a fresh look without having to do much work or spend much. So i think the room was a typical drywall wall and ceiling. Then they covered the walls with thin themed panels for a look. They also added a second ceiling. Its a few inches below the drywall ceiling. Looks to be made of recycled paper product (tho i could be off on that). - When i got here i had to replace the (i think return) air vent cover. So i could get a small look inside/behind the wall. And it looks like behind the paneling is drywall. Possibly two layers, im not sure. (there was some shoddy dyi work all around the house i came to realize. So u can never discount anything).

The reason i never took the paneling down was because of how they installed it. Im assuming the roof base bare, and then they added the thin themed paneling from the floor to the ceiling. AND THEN, they added the carpet and the new paper ceiling a few inches below. So removing the paneling completely would require removing the paper ceiling. And i didnt want to do that. I also didnt want to remove the carpet.

But unfortunately.. after getting screwed over by a roommate that i was renting the room out to.. i now have to replace the carpet anyway which requires ripping up the one that is in there. And if i have to do that, im only that one ceiling obstetrical away (i would hope) from being able to take down the wall to re-insulate.

So im looking for a way to remove this wall without removing the ceiling and without breaking the wall so it can be put back up. I was considering something like making a long thin cut from end to end just below the new ceiling line (where the trim would cover up) and trying to go from there.

Like i said, given some of the things iv seen here, im sure there will be some unanticipated surprises along the way. But is it doable to bring this down intact? Or is it goign to be a matter or trying to save the paneling and the drywall is a lost cause and would have to be replaced.. And if cutting in along the top of the wall, end to end, below the new ceiling line would work, how exactly would i do that/what tools for that job? Or would a razor be enough (the panel is kind of wood like tho)?

View attachment 421289

View attachment 421290

A litte ms paint job to try an illustrate..
View attachment 421291
if the return is connected to both rooms sound insulation will do nothing for you. It takes a sound deadening box to do that, which makes sound waves turn two directions to break them.
there is an outlet on that wall so the wire comes down or up and will need to be allowed for. Blown insulation will give a little help or hang a heavy curtain on both walls. A fix for thin, hollow, walls is not easy or cheap without a mess.
 

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Trying to sound proof between 2 rooms is a difficult task. Studs transfer a lot of the sound between rooms. To do it right, each room has its own set of studs. The dry wall is fastened to the studs for the appropriate room. This cuts out the sound transmission by the studs.

Insulation between the rooms will help, but not eliminate sound.

What type of insulation do you plan to use. Be sure that it is designed for sound proofing and not just for heat/cool insulation.

George
 

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I always insulate between floors and between walls. I use 6" R 19 batts or rolls and it does make a big difference. It's not "sound proof" but it's appreciably more quiet especially with solid core doors leading to the rooms. Sound proof won't happen in a residential home, but sound transmission can be reduced. High frequency sounds seem to easier to reduce than low frequency ones, especially like a booming sub woofer.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Trying to sound proof between 2 rooms is a difficult task. Studs transfer a lot of the sound between rooms. To do it right, each room has its own set of studs. The dry wall is fastened to the studs for the appropriate room. This cuts out the sound transmission by the studs.

Insulation between the rooms will help, but not eliminate sound.

What type of insulation do you plan to use. Be sure that it is designed for sound proofing and not just for heat/cool insulation.

George
yea, i can assure you im not building another wall. Not only that, i dont see that going well if i did it in this room specifically. You can see fomr the pics in the OP where the door is. Another wall would block that.

But anyway.. it may not eliminate the sound, but ill take the reduction. Not only does the general noise annoy me.. well.. generally.. but hopefully it will make it a little more tolerable for those that rent the two rooms out. Iv shared a wall with another bedroom like that before and its incredibly annoying. And since its half probable that there is no insulation in there (being an interior wall) that would mean the only ting separating the rooms is the drywall and panel. So yea, ill take the reduction.

As for what type of insulation, i havnt picked one out specifically yet. But i know that lowes (and probably every where else) has batt/roll insulation labeled as sound proofing insulation (even if its not actual 'proof'). So i assumed id get one of those kinds if i can get this wall down without destroying everything.

I always insulate between floors and between walls. I use 6" R 19 batts or rolls and it does make a big difference. It's not "sound proof" but it's appreciably more quiet especially with solid core doors leading to the rooms. Sound proof won't happen in a residential home, but sound transmission can be reduced. High frequency sounds seem to easier to reduce than low frequency ones, especially like a booming sub woofer.
i was actually wondering about that, as was probably going to ask later; How that works with doors. Cause the two rooms doors are right next to each other (effectively). Even a good wall wouldnt seem to good if the doors let everything through.
 

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buy a multitool, if your broke harbor fright has them from $19 to $99
remove trim and use the multitool to cut the paneling at the roof
multitool blade vibrates rapidly so you can plunge cut straight in

that said, it probably won't reduce the noise transmission much to insulate
most noise is transmitted thru solid studs or vibration, paneling doesn't resist vibration
insulation between floor joists is great for heat loss but does little for sound transmission
definitely use sheetrock when you go back, sheetrock doesn't vibrate much
a layer of sheetrock on both sides would be more effective and you wouldn't need to remove anything
 

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buy a multitool, if your broke harbor fright has them from $19 to $99
remove trim and use the multitool to cut the paneling at the roof
multitool blade vibrates rapidly so you can plunge cut straight in

that said, it probably won't reduce the noise transmission much to insulate
most noise is transmitted thru solid studs or vibration, paneling doesn't resist vibration
insulation between floor joists is great for heat loss but does little for sound transmission
definitely use sheetrock when you go back, sheetrock doesn't vibrate much
a layer of sheetrock on both sides would be more effective and you wouldn't need to remove anything
Now that is a good idea. Add a layer to each side and save all of that work.

George
 

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This product would require the wall to be stripped down to bare studs, however this product is designed as an acoustical barrier. SilentSilver Thermoquiet 500 sq. ft. 4 ft. x 125 ft. x 1/8 in. 5 in 1 Thermal Acoustic Insulated Underlayment-TQ500B35 - The Home Depot
  • Certified acoustic barrier - STC 66 / IIC 68 / delta 20 - can be used as an acoustic membrane for flooring wall and ceiling applications (Behind the drywall)
  • As explanation of the above abbreviations please refer to this article on sound transmission ratings. Explaining Sound Ratings (isostore.com)


Yes, before every says this for floors, it can also be used on vertical walls as per the manufactures specs. 4111c2c6-c0c9-4403-8c59-a64daecbff08.pdf (homedepot-static.com)
  • Product can be used under laminate, engineered or hardwood flooring, carpet or ceramic tiles, or behind drywall in walls and ceilings as a thermal/acoustic barrier
I have no connection with this product and no first hand experience on the effectiveness of it. There are many similar comparative products for this application, which to research and choose from.

Good luck in your project.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
buy a multitool, if your broke harbor fright has them from $19 to $99
remove trim and use the multitool to cut the paneling at the roof
multitool blade vibrates rapidly so you can plunge cut straight in

that said, it probably won't reduce the noise transmission much to insulate
most noise is transmitted thru solid studs or vibration, paneling doesn't resist vibration
insulation between floor joists is great for heat loss but does little for sound transmission
definitely use sheetrock when you go back, sheetrock doesn't vibrate much
a layer of sheetrock on both sides would be more effective and you wouldn't need to remove anything
Now that is a good idea. Add a layer to each side and save all of that work.

George
Im not sure i follow.
Its a wall between two bedrooms, and the wall already likely has a layer of drywall on each side of it. Then the paneling placed over it just to 'make it look nice' (done by previous owners). How is adding another layer of drywall making any difference in this situation?
 

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Im not sure i follow.
Its a wall between two bedrooms, and the wall already likely has a layer of drywall on each side of it. Then the paneling placed over it just to 'make it look nice' (done by previous owners). How is adding another layer of drywall making any difference in this situation?
I don't get it either. A layer of sheetrock isn't going to do much.
Probably the cheapest and easiest way you could reduce the sound is to carpet over the wall with padding. They also make soundproofing tiles you could stick up over the paneling if you didn't mind the appearance and take them down when no longer needed. . https://www.amazon.com/JBER-Soundproofing-Treatment-Padding-Sound-Absorbing/dp/B07WVBLXHC
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Trying to sound proof between 2 rooms is a difficult task. Studs transfer a lot of the sound between rooms. To do it right, each room has its own set of studs. The dry wall is fastened to the studs for the appropriate room. This cuts out the sound transmission by the studs.

Insulation between the rooms will help, but not eliminate sound.

What type of insulation do you plan to use. Be sure that it is designed for sound proofing and not just for heat/cool insulation.

George
This keeps running around in my head for some reason. I dismissed this due to the size and design of the room. As you can see in the pic, the door is right there by the wall. This is also the smaller of the two rooms and im not keep on making it smaller. However the room on the other side which is slightly larger; the door is actually ON that same wall.

But i went and measured the space between the paneling and the door trim in this room weve been talking about. It is exactly 1.5".. Exactly the size of a 2x4. So if i removed the paneling and the drywall, added another 2x4 frame wall, and re added the drywall and paneling.. then the wall would be exactly where the back end of that door time is. With the exception of any space added by 2x4 woods natural bow, and any space that might be needed between the two 'walls'.

Which brings up the first question, of would space be needed between the two 2x4 framed walls? I would assume a small bit at least. If sounds transfers from studs, then i would guess that placing them in direct contact with each other wouldnt be as effective. However given the next to no room to work before hitting the door... the space would have to be very small. Any space added would be going into where the trim is. One can always cut down or get smaller trim, but the margin there is small.

Assuming i could make it fit.. i can make a simple 2x4 frame and drill the end pieces into the side walls for support. There is the door frame on one side so there should be studs there. The far side im not sure about tho.
However.. i dont wish to take the paper ceiling down, so this new wall would only be able to go up to where the paper ceiling is (which is a couple inches below the ceiling drywall). So if there is no stud on the far wall, id have to peel back some more paneling and drywall to add one, which would suck. At least it wouldnt be a load bearing wall.. jsut next to the load bearing wall. But without being able to secure the top with nails/screws to support the new wall, then i would need both ends to be secured.

It may end up not being the most pretty thing ever, but i do see a small window where it might work.
 

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I understand the noise is an issue for you, seems like a lot of work to address it from a construction perspective.

What about some white noise?

Probably too expensive, but at least sets you on a path, we have a Dyson fan in our bedroom, it creates enough white noise that we don't hear anything else going on in the nearby rooms.

There are many ways to produce white noise.
 

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I understand the noise is an issue for you, seems like a lot of work to address it from a construction perspective.

What about some white noise?

Probably too expensive, but at least sets you on a path, we have a Dyson fan in our bedroom, it creates enough white noise that we don't hear anything else going on in the nearby rooms.

There are many ways to produce white noise.
These are rooms that he rents out. White noise would not help.

George
 

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This keeps running around in my head for some reason. I dismissed this due to the size and design of the room. As you can see in the pic, the door is right there by the wall. This is also the smaller of the two rooms and im not keep on making it smaller. However the room on the other side which is slightly larger; the door is actually ON that same wall.

But i went and measured the space between the paneling and the door trim in this room weve been talking about. It is exactly 1.5".. Exactly the size of a 2x4. So if i removed the paneling and the drywall, added another 2x4 frame wall, and re added the drywall and paneling.. then the wall would be exactly where the back end of that door time is. With the exception of any space added by 2x4 woods natural bow, and any space that might be needed between the two 'walls'.

Which brings up the first question, of would space be needed between the two 2x4 framed walls? I would assume a small bit at least. If sounds transfers from studs, then i would guess that placing them in direct contact with each other wouldnt be as effective. However given the next to no room to work before hitting the door... the space would have to be very small. Any space added would be going into where the trim is. One can always cut down or get smaller trim, but the margin there is small.

Assuming i could make it fit.. i can make a simple 2x4 frame and drill the end pieces into the side walls for support. There is the door frame on one side so there should be studs there. The far side im not sure about tho.
However.. i dont wish to take the paper ceiling down, so this new wall would only be able to go up to where the paper ceiling is (which is a couple inches below the ceiling drywall). So if there is no stud on the far wall, id have to peel back some more paneling and drywall to add one, which would suck. At least it wouldnt be a load bearing wall.. jsut next to the load bearing wall. But without being able to secure the top with nails/screws to support the new wall, then i would need both ends to be secured.

It may end up not being the most pretty thing ever, but i do see a small window where it might work.
It does not take much separation to stop the noise vibrations. 1/4-1/2" should be sufficient.

George
 

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These are rooms that he rents out. White noise would not help.

George
White noise is used extensively in open office spaces, it is very effective.

White noise in his room will help, the OP can try it for way less effort than building another wall, probably already has a cheap fan he could run, there are also phone apps. I don't think either solution will eliminate all noise, there is a bang for the buck perspective here it seems, lower cost is better.
 

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These are rooms that he rents out. White noise would not help.

George
OK I'll bite. "White noise would not help"? How does white noise differentiate between noise coming from a rented room and noise coming any adjacent room?
 
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