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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, new kid here. I'm restoring a vintage arcade cabinet which has a fair amount of oak trim. it consists of oak boards that are about 4" X 24" X 3/4".

Some dummy painted the oak with black paint probably decades ago, and although I removed it with Citrus strip, I notice there is a lot of black paint left in the grain, which is too deep to sand away.

Do you guys have any effective techniques for removing black paint from oak grain? Thanks for any ideas.
 

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The citrus strip was too mild. If you would use a methylene chloride remover such as Kleen Strip I think you would have better results. I would recommend brushing it on and keep it wet with remover for about a half an hour and then use a brass brush and rub the paint out of the grain. Then if you have one, use a low pressured power washer or one you can adjust the pressure down and rinse the paint out of the grain with the water. You won't have it wet long enough to affect the glue joints. It will raise the grain but that is a good thing at that stage. I use a small cheap electric power washer that is 1500 psi. The power washer will lift the paint out of the grain the brush alone wouldn't do. If that isn't an option you can rinse the residue off with lacquer thinner.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, Steve. I'll take that advice.

Some of the oak has been removed, but some of it must remain on the machine as it is too integrated into the design. I was hoping to replace all the oak but I wouldn't be able to replace the deeply integrated portion and there would be a matching problem.

I'll have to go with plan B, the laquer thinner as there are lots of relays and switches still installed in the cabinet.

I'll get to work and report my results. Thanks for your time!
 

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Thanks, Steve. I'll take that advice.

Some of the oak has been removed, but some of it must remain on the machine as it is too integrated into the design. I was hoping to replace all the oak but I wouldn't be able to replace the deeply integrated portion and there would be a matching problem.

I'll have to go with plan B, the laquer thinner as there are lots of relays and switches still installed in the cabinet.

I'll get to work and report my results. Thanks for your time!
That will work. It's just really important to wash the residue off well. The methylene chloride as well as waxes in the stripper will interfere with the new finish. They put waxes in the stripper to skim over the surface of the remover so it doesn't evaporate so bad.
 
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