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I couldn't begin to guess how many I've repaired like that and didn't have any problems. Now if had been poorly repaired previously then I just cut it off, drill it out and turn a new rung. That is easier than trying to fix someone else's work.
Agree. My work versus others.
 

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If it's a clean break I see no reason to force it out, but if hes determined, doesnt matter..

It could have be broken trying to twist it out.

Like I said earlier. If glue is stronger than the wood, what's the problem.... is this a case where it's not?
 

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I deal with chair repairs many times a month where I do volunteer work at the woodshop, the policy is if it can't be fixed in a manner to ensure the safety of the user I say "no" or if the cost to properly repair it is more than they are willing pay then it is also "no". Fixing chairs has a certain liability issue if someone is injured from a poor repair.
 

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If it wont fit back in, it is likely that the piece is slightly warped or twisted. I would sand or lightly chisel to get the piece to fit back in. Once this is done, you can get epoxy and some thickener and put the pieces back together. The thickened epoxy will fill in where the sanding and light chiseling removed some wood. The epoxy could be darkened by mixing very little saw dust in it. the best clamp for this would be surgical tubing. Just wrap it where you can. The epoxied joint could also be held together with masking tape and sand the tape off when the epoxy sets.
Before actual epoxying, make several practice runs including the clamping system you choose.
Epoxy has all the strength that any adhesive or filler would give and so that id why it would be my first choice.
Also keep in mind that chair repairs are difficult because every joint depends on the other and most often the whole assembly must come apart and be re-glued. I think your biggest problem will be in removing all the little nails.
If you dont address all of the joints, this will likely happen again but on a different leg.
 

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"The epoxied joint could also be held together with masking tape and sand the tape off when the epoxy sets", Not my first choice, instead wrap the joint with wax paper, epoxy won't stick to it, use duct tape instead of masking tape. A single edge razor blade can remove excess epoxy, by sanding the tape off you have to match the existing finish.
 

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Masking tape comes off pretty easily from epoxy and cleaning it up is fast. Most masking taping is as somewhat flexible which wax paper is not. Assuming the chair is wood, mixing very little sawdust with the epoxy will darken the epoxy. When it comes to repairs with wood, the dark line is not very visible especially on a low area on the stretcher at a corner junction. Of course this can be complicated by purchasing dyes which should not be necessary in this case.
Cyanoacrolate would never be my choice for repairs on a stressed area.
Also keep in mind that the entire bottom with all the legs and stretchers must be assembled all at the same time. That is why I recommended epoxy and surgical tubing for clamps. Other glue joints if loose, must be disassembled and re-glued all at the same time. This includes removing all nails, or it will fail again and probably soon.
The biggest time consumption on this job will be disassembly of all failed glue joints and joint cleaning where necessary.
 
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