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Have a table saw?

Start with the blade center 5.5" from the fence.
Set the blade height to the depth of the center of the curve, run the board across.
Lower the blade a bit, move the fence one blade width, run board, flip end to end, run again.
Repeat until you are one blade width from the fence, and the blade is nearly flush to the saw table top.

Scrape/sand until smooth.
Otherwise use a skill saw and do the same from the top. Harder when you get close to the edge to support the saw. Use scraps same thickness of the project to support the saw. Use a straight guide of some sort to make sure the saw goes where you want it to.
Or it could be cut on a CNC. Unlikely that you have one but you might find someone locally who could do it for you.
 

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Make a router sled where the sled follows the same contour you want to recreate in your workpiece. The sled can be cut with a jigsaw and will include 2 identical pieces that can be fastened to opposing edges of your workpieces.

Use a router baseplate that spans the sled, and with a straight bit, move the router along the sled.

This is very similar to a sled designed to plane large boards flat with a router, but instead of planing flat, you'll route to form the profile.
 

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I am not sure of the dimensions, hard for my old eyes to read.

If I am reading correctly, it is 11in long x 7in wide.

Draw out the profile, then I would make a series of cuts with table saw along the width to the depth to match the profile.

I would then use either a 4in angle grinder with a coarse sanding wheel or if you have the tool, a spokeshave to remove the material between the cut lines.

I curved sole hand plane also could be used, but not easy to find these days.
 

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Can still count to 10 yea
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Another possibility might be a cove type cut on a table saw. Might take a little testing to find the right angle though.

http://youtu.be/5gAp8kG5gjc
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Unfortunately I dont have any of the old school tools. The cove jig or router jig look to be a few options. As I really dislike the router I think I'll give the table saw cove jig a try.
 

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bzguy
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Most table saws are 10-12", that radius look much bigger than any blade even run straight (90 degrees) across it.
 

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master sawdust maker
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Most table saws are 10-12", that radius look much bigger than any blade even run straight (90 degrees) across it.
It would be possible to do this with multiple passes. I would not run it 90* to the blade, I would do a typical cove, just a few of them in conjunction with each other. just keep nibbling up to the line and then move the fence and start over, wash, rinse, repeat.
 

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Maker of sawdust
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I agree on the table saw with one other step. after the first couple of cuts make a one or two degree adjustment so that you don't end up with all the little steps or not as many.
Jerry
 

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where's my table saw?
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a piece of cake with a bandsaw

Why not just find someone or someplace who has one...15 seconds later you done. Woodcraft has Saturday classes, Industrial Design schools have shops where a student or instructor would help out, a cabinet shop and lumber "mill" not yard, Senior Centers have woodshops, military bases have shops, find an ad on craigs list for a bandsaw and don't but it, just go over and ask if you can test it out.... :thumbdown:
 

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bzguy
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It would be possible to do this with multiple passes. I would not run it 90* to the blade, I would do a typical cove, just a few of them in conjunction with each other. just keep nibbling up to the line and then move the fence and start over, wash, rinse, repeat.
What is a "typical" cove?
The whole radius itself is a big cove.
It is not possible to arrive at the radius without a thickness measurement at the middle, looks to be around and inch?
If you do it this way you you will wind up lowering the blade by trial and error, and wind up with a series of smaller radiused (typical?) coves adjacent to each other, like a reversed scallop shell.
I agree that 90 degrees will not work and stated that, but it as close as you'll get to a true radius without the band-saw.
If you're going to hand sand it into the desired shape in the end, 4d thinker's method is a lot easier.
 
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