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I have a client that would like to have this style door, I have made many raised panel doors, but am unsure how to go about this with the bead. Any suggestions/links to the appropriate bits?

Thank You!
 

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It looks like there is molding attached to the face of the flat panel. You can tell that the rails and stiles are cope and stick, but then the molding is mitered. I would just build the door with a flat panel and then add the molding to the panel.
 

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It looks like there is molding attached to the face of the flat panel. You can tell that the rails and stiles are cope and stick, but then the molding is mitered. I would just build the door with a flat panel and then add the molding to the panel.
I don't think there is a molding its part of the Rail And Stile cutter that makes it look that way.
 

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It looks like there is molding attached to the face of the flat panel. You can tell that the rails and stiles are cope and stick, but then the molding is mitered. I would just build the door with a flat panel and then add the molding to the panel.
+1. :yes: Looks like two mouldings.




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Those doors can be done either way. A rail and stile bit set or by adding a molding to a square edged or rabbetted frame. It's a little difficult to see the profile of the bead. MCLS has a wide selection of rail and stile bits, kind of looks like an Ogee to me. CMT has some specialty bits, too. Most of the matched bits can be set for slightly different depths, to accentuate the bead profile. The raised panel looks like a standard cove shape, set with a face shoulder. The edge shape looks like what is called "classical" shape, a bead and set back cove, like a traditional bed molding. Of course the finish looks like a glazing liquid was used and left in the grooves of the molding to highlight the "shadows".

Typically, cabinet shops would have shapers doing this work. They would use cutters that might be custom made, making their profiles somewhat different than everyone else's. The standard router bits might differ slightly but it's not likely anyone would know if you didn't tell them.
 

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It could just be just an ogee rail and stile but it is hard to tell. When I put in molding (baseboards, crown, etc.), I always do a coping cut on inside 90 degree inside corners. When you look at it, you cannot tell if it is mitered or coped unless you look at it from the top (Base boards that is). In the above picture, it almost looks like there is a lip on the on the most inner part of the rails. If so, I think it would have to two pieces with the inside piece mitered.
 

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Those doors can be done either way. A rail and stile bit set or by adding a molding to a square edged or rabbetted frame. It's a little difficult to see the profile of the bead. MCLS has a wide selection of rail and stile bits, kind of looks like an Ogee to me. CMT has some specialty bits, too. Most of the matched bits can be set for slightly different depths, to accentuate the bead profile. The raised panel looks like a standard cove shape, set with a face shoulder. The edge shape looks like what is called "classical" shape, a bead and set back cove, like a traditional bed molding. Of course the finish looks like a glazing liquid was used and left in the grooves of the molding to highlight the "shadows".

Typically, cabinet shops would have shapers doing this work. They would use cutters that might be custom made, making their profiles somewhat different than everyone else's. The standard router bits might differ slightly but it's not likely anyone would know if you didn't tell them.
Here are some of the profiles you mentioned:

http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shop...rthtml/pages/rail_and_stile_router_bits1.html
 

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Wow, what an illusion! The first time I looked at these pictures and commented, I swore that there was a molding on top of a flat panel, but looking at them again and studying how the light reflections are playing off the surfaces, it is now clear that the panel is indeed raised and what I thought was a molding standing proud of the panel is actually a cove on the raised panel profile.

I elect to change my answer from above.

It's still hard to tell the exact profile used, but it does look like a standard ogee profile. If there is a bead like the OP mentions then these are typically done by adding a bead molding. I remember seeing that Kreg made a tool for adding the bead to the rail and stile profile. Search YouTube for Kreg beaded face frame and that will walk you through it.
 

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Wow, what an illusion! The first time I looked at these pictures and commented, I swore that there was a molding on top of a flat panel, but looking at them again and studying how the light reflections are playing off the surfaces, it is now clear that the panel is indeed raised and what I thought was a molding standing proud of the panel is actually a cove on the raised panel profile.

I elect to change my answer from above.

It's still hard to tell the exact profile used, but it does look like a standard ogee profile. If there is a bead like the OP mentions then these are typically done by adding a bead molding. I remember seeing that Kreg made a tool for adding the bead to the rail and stile profile. Search YouTube for Kreg beaded face frame and that will walk you through it.
I think the drawer panel is flat, and the door panel is raised.
 

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It just looks like a cabinet door set to me. A lot of times a cabinet shop will grind their own tooling to make cabinet doors for use with a shaper. It may not be possible to just purchase a router bit set to do this exactly. Perhaps what is catching their eye is the finish. Someone has stained and sealed the door and then when over it with a glaze to make the detail of the panel and sticking more pronounced. It's not at all difficult to do. The glaze step is like applying a gel stain and wiping the excess off. The dark color of the glaze sticks in the crevice's. Maybe you could get close on the tooling and copy the look. It would get too expensive to match the tooling for just one job.
 

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looks like an ogee stile and rail with a "classical" bit profiling the outer edge, I've used that bit to make some slab door fronts but never on my five piece doors, looks nice though and a lot of cracks for the glaze to show! hope this helps, rockler or any other woodworking store has those ogee door sets for routers its all about gettin em set up right, I have the freud set in a roundover style and I love it!
 

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I forgot to say that the photos are just from the web.

If you are interested I can post some pics of ones that u have built. No offense intended to whom ever made those drawers and doors, but they are not the best example of what the finished project looks like.
 
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