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I want to make outdoor sofas & chairs for use by my pool, using the design shown here http://www.homemade-modern.com/ep70-outdoor-sofa/ The design uses recessed lagbolts to join the 4"x8"s being used for the arms.

Do you think a waterproof wood glue like Tribond III would be a good way to join the 4"x8"s, or are the lag bolts really necessary?

Does you have ideas/pros/cons for using smaller boards that are less expensive like 2"x8"s or 4"x4"s glued/joined together to create a similar look? I want to use cedar so it will last in the Texas weather, so I'm looking for ways to get close to the same look for cheaper.

Also what do you think about the L-brackets used to support the seat boards? I'm thinking screwing a rail barallel to the 4"x8"s to support the seat boards or a dado joint would be much stronger. I thought those type of brackets were just to reinforce framing joints, not to carry load as they are being used in the link above. Is there a better bracket?

Thanks! :smile3:
 

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Nice project. If it were me I would plane smooth the mating services the join with biscuts and glue. They used timber screws. This would offer a best surface .For the cross members ( seat and back ) I would mortise and tendon them. Then use timber screws to afix them from the sides. If you counter sink the screws you then could peg the counter sink with some matching wood . This way you have all wood to the eye. You can use L brackets if desired but with weather you will eventually have rust and loose screws. Tom
 

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Hi KM,

I love Cant Style furniture that is becoming more and more common today. It is a simplistic rustic form that lends itself well to modern motif and tastes in furniture, yet still embraces natural materials...

I'm not sure if you would be interested, but this is actually small scale Timber Framing and I wouldn't ever (nor do we) use hardware for such projects...

KMBuster said:
Do you think a waterproof wood glue like Tribond III would be a good way to join the 4"x8"s, or are the lag bolts really necessary?
There are some application in certain designs for adhesives...and we use both Titebond III and other Structural adhesives..Yet this is not common or typical.

I would also add that adhesives in general...especially epoxies and even Titebond...can trap moisture, along with interstitial moisture pockets, and make the wood rot...!!!

Again, unless hand forged, there is no application of hardware (typically)...only joinery...

KMBuster said:
Does you have ideas/pros/cons for using smaller boards that are less expensive like 2"x8"s or 4"x4"s glued/joined together to create a similar look?
If you do choose to go with smaller dimension wood materials (Slab Style Furniture) then in only makes it slightly different...but still nice. Joinery systems are about the same as well...just smaller and less work to cut compared to larger pieces...

KMBuster said:
I want to use cedar so it will last in the Texas weather, so I'm looking for ways to get close to the same look for cheaper.
I'm on a project in Katy Texas now and have worked on and off down south over the years. You have a huge selection of tree species to select from (depending on where you are in Texas) as good (if not better) than Junipers (aka what Americans call Cedar.)

Locust...Live Oak...White Oak...Cypress...Mesquite...Osage...

Even some of the less rot resistant species like Pine, or anything you like actually, can be jointed with more diligence to water drainage and treated with tradtional (natural) finishes and methods like 焼き杉 (Yakisug.)

Even something like White Pine can last decades outside with only minimal care each season if attention to traditional joinery and finishes are applied well...

KMBuster said:
Also what do you think about the L-brackets used to support the seat boards? I'm thinking screwing a rail barallel to the 4"x8"s to support the seat boards or a dado joint would be much stronger. I thought those type of brackets were just to reinforce framing joints, not to carry load as they are being used in the link above. Is there a better bracket?
I'm sure you could make that work...but for me, I don't ever see a reason to "reinvent wheels" when traditional joinery works and has for millenia...

KISS principle at play here...and why spend the extra $$$ on hardware that isn't needed...
 

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I would join the big boards using large Oak dowels about the size of a broom handle.
 

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I want to make outdoor sofas & chairs for use by my pool, using the design shown here http://www.homemade-modern.com/ep70-outdoor-sofa/ The design uses recessed lagbolts to join the 4"x8"s being used for the arms.

Do you think a waterproof wood glue like Tribond III would be a good way to join the 4"x8"s, or are the lag bolts really necessary?

Does you have ideas/pros/cons for using smaller boards that are less expensive like 2"x8"s or 4"x4"s glued/joined together to create a similar look? I want to use cedar so it will last in the Texas weather, so I'm looking for ways to get close to the same look for cheaper.

Also what do you think about the L-brackets used to support the seat boards? I'm thinking screwing a rail barallel to the 4"x8"s to support the seat boards or a dado joint would be much stronger. I thought those type of brackets were just to reinforce framing joints, not to carry load as they are being used in the link above. Is there a better bracket?

Thanks! :smile3:
Like most, I would prefer some sort of mechanical support, from some sort of bolt or better an interlocking wood joint. One thing I learned when I first started making dovetail joints, a pretty bad dovetail is still a very strong joint once the glue fills the gaps.
I wouldn't use traditional wood glue like titebond. I would use 3M 4200 boat glue in a calk tube. That stuff is ridiculously strong and easy to use. Come is white or brown. http://tinyurl.com/mpl97jo
 

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Like most, I would prefer some sort of mechanical support, from some sort of bolt or better an interlocking wood joint. One thing I learned when I first started making dovetail joints, a pretty bad dovetail is still a very strong joint once the glue fills the gaps.
I wouldn't use traditional wood glue like titebond. I would use 3M 4200 boat glue in a calk tube. That stuff is ridiculously strong and easy to use. Come is white or brown. http://tinyurl.com/mpl97jo
Correction, 3M-5200 not 3M-4200 http://tinyurl.com/lkd8ojm

4200 is formulated to allow for the possibility of future disassembly. With 5200 ain't never coming apart. If you are screwing a deck cleat to a boat deck and you shoot some 4200 down as a sealer, you can get it apart later, probably and with some effort. With 5200 you will tear a hunk of deck up with the cleat.
 
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