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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a piece of maple log that I hollowed out and was pretty much done with it which I had been working on in my garage. Once I was done with it I brought it in the house and then a couple days after being in the house a few cracks appeared in the piece. Here is the piece showing the cracks.



My questions what would be best way to fix these cracks and hopefully prevent them from cracking any more than they already have?
 

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First of all, how long has it been since the tree was felled? I think the wood is still drying and will continue to crack so to fix it now may be a waste of time. Bringing it into the house just lowered the moisture contend a little.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
This is a piece from a tree I found that had fallen on my property. I have no idea how long it has been since it fell. I cut most of up for firewood but kept this piece because of the big burl. If I had to guess it has probably been down for several years but had been laying on the ground out in the weather. It also sat in my garage for a couple of year before I actually did anything with it.
 

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If you have the room perhaps it would be a good idea to leave it in your house for a while and see what happens. Generally cut boards take a year to dry for every inch of thickness. In a log it takes longer so perhaps might take 8-10 years to dry. In 8-10 years on my place a log would be completely rotten so I doubt if the log you have is seasoned enough to use. Keeping it in your house where it is more climate controlled will accelerate the drying process so if it's not ready I think more cracks will appear. To answer your initial question most people fix a crack like that with a bow-tie patch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I never heard of a bow-tie patch, what is that? I found a video by Woodworkers Guild of America that shows using Baking Soda and CA glue (cyanoacrylate), would that work? I have never used it so I am not sure if it would work with something like this.
 

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I never heard of a bow-tie patch, what is that? I found a video by Woodworkers Guild of America that shows using Baking Soda and CA glue (cyanoacrylate), would that work? I have never used it so I am not sure if it would work with something like this.
This is a bow-tie patch.

Using baking soda and CA glue would be worse than doing nothing. I don't see any logic in using either for that application. Baking soda won't do anything for the wood but dirty it up and CA glue is far too thin to glue the crack together. Once the crack is stabilized there are a number of different products you might fill the crack. Some people use a clear epoxy filler, some mix saw dust and wood glue. I think I would be inclined to mix some bondo the color of the finished wood and fill it with that. A universal tinting color like a paint store has in their machines to make paint can be added to bondo prior to using the hardener. You just have to leave the color a little less red to allow for the color of the hardener.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I am going to leave the piece alone for a couple more weeks to see what the cracks do before I make decision on what to do with them.

Thanks for the input, I really appreciate it.
 
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